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Special Issue "Cognitive and Emotional Effects of Sleep Deprivation"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Giuseppe Curcio
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Applied Clinical and Biotechnological Sciences, University of L'Aquila, 67010 L'Aquila, Italy
Interests: memory; attention; neuropsychological assessment; sleep; executive functions; circadian rhythms; aging; neurodegenerative diseases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sleep loss is unanimously considered to be one of the main problems of our society. Usually, each of us is preoccupied with numerous daily interests, and prefers to sacrifice some sleep time in the hope that this will enable us to carry out many other activities without inducing dangerous effects. Unfortunately, sleep deprivation has various consequences, such as sleepiness and impairments in neurocognitive and psychomotor performance. Sleepiness is worsened by extreme work rhythms, shift work, and hostile environments, and can induce a progressive worsening of health status. Effects are easily visible in several contexts: at work, in the military, in road safety and public health, in daily and education environments, and so on. Moreover, it is well documented in the literature that sleep-deprived individuals are comparable with the ninth percentile of non-sleep-deprived people. These effects on neurological and behavioral functioning after sleep restriction and/or deprivation are common to all people, even though some individual differences in vulnerability to sleep loss have been shown and need to be better understood, particularly in applicative settings. Therefore, the present Special Issue is intended to address the psychological, neural, and cognitive processes that underlie sleep deprivation; the neural bases of these effects; the exogenous factors able to influences them; and the relevance of these issues on daily activities and general health status.

Innovative contributions and results of empirical studies that increase our understanding of how sleep debt influences brain functioning are the focus of this Special Issue. Hence, it is open to articles, reviews, case reports, and position papers on related issues.

Dr. Curcio Giuseppe
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sleepiness
  • Memory
  • Attention
  • Decision-making
  • Affective functioning
  • Circadian
  • Environmental aspects
  • Lifestyle
  • Neuro-psychophysiological correlates
  • Individual differences

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Article
Association between Shift Work and Neurocognitive Function among Firefighters in South Korea: A Prospective before–after Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(13), 4647; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17134647 - 28 Jun 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1524
Abstract
Background: Recent research indicates that shift work is associated with neurocognitive function. However, studies that examine the association between shift work and neurocognitive function in firefighters have not yet been performed. We examined the effect of shift work on neurocognitive function in [...] Read more.
Background: Recent research indicates that shift work is associated with neurocognitive function. However, studies that examine the association between shift work and neurocognitive function in firefighters have not yet been performed. We examined the effect of shift work on neurocognitive function in firefighters by measuring and comparing neurocognitive function before and after night shift. Methods: 352 firefighters from eight fire stations in South Korea were included in this study. We performed neurocognitive function test using central nervous system vital signs (CNSVS) during daytime work and on the next day after night work. We performed paired t-tests to assess differences between neurocognitive function before and after night work. We also compared neurocognitive function in insomnia and depression. We used a general linear model to analyze the associations between shiftwork schedule and the changes in neurocognitive function. Results: The neurocognitive function significantly decreased in six domains (composite memory, verbal memory, visual memory, complex attention, psychomotor speed, and motor speed) as did the neurocognitive index on the next day after night work compared with during day work. These decreased domains were the same following night work regardless of the type of shift work. Conclusion: Night work in firefighters may cause neurocognitive decline. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cognitive and Emotional Effects of Sleep Deprivation)
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Article
The Impact of Optimized Daylight and Views on the Sleep Duration and Cognitive Performance of Office Workers
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(9), 3219; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17093219 - 06 May 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 4691
Abstract
A growing awareness has recently emerged on the health benefits of exposure to daylight and views. Daylight exposure is linked to circadian rhythm regulation, which can have significant impacts on sleep quality and cognitive function. Views of nature have also been shown to [...] Read more.
A growing awareness has recently emerged on the health benefits of exposure to daylight and views. Daylight exposure is linked to circadian rhythm regulation, which can have significant impacts on sleep quality and cognitive function. Views of nature have also been shown to impact emotional affect and performance. This study explores the impact of optimized daylight and views on the sleep and cognitive performance of office workers. Thirty knowledge workers spent one week working in each of two office environments with identical layouts, furnishings, and orientations; however, one was outfitted with electrochromic glass and the other with traditional blinds, producing lighting conditions of 40.6 and 316 equivalent melanopic lux, respectively. Participants in the optimized daylight and views condition slept 37 min longer as measured by wrist-worn actigraphs and scored 42% higher on cognitive simulations designed to test their higher order decision-making performance. Both sleep and cognitive function were impacted after one day in the space, yet the impacts became more significant over the course of the week. The positive effect of optimized daylight and views on cognitive function was comparable for almost all participants, while increases in sleep duration were significantly greater for those with the lowest baseline sleep duration. This study stresses the significance of designing with daylight in order to optimize the sleep quality and performance of office workers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cognitive and Emotional Effects of Sleep Deprivation)
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Article
Influence of Sleeping Patterns in Health and Academic Performance Among University Students
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2760; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17082760 - 16 Apr 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2491
Abstract
Sleep problems in university students are important and have implications for health, quality of life, and academic performance. Using an ex post facto design, a total sample of 855 students (55.7% women) participated in the study. Sleep assessment was conducted using the Pittsburgh [...] Read more.
Sleep problems in university students are important and have implications for health, quality of life, and academic performance. Using an ex post facto design, a total sample of 855 students (55.7% women) participated in the study. Sleep assessment was conducted using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Nightmare Frequency Scale, the Nightmare Proneness Scale, and the Composite Morningness Scale. Women show a higher risk [OR = 2.61] of presenting poor sleep quality (> 5 points on the PSQI) compared with men (p < 0.001). Similarly, women reported a greater frequency of nightmares (p < 0.001, d = 0.60), greater propensity for nightmares (p < 0.001, d = 0.70) and a higher score on Item-5h of the PSQI regarding nightmares (p < 0.001, d = 0.59). Women, compared with men, show higher risk [OR = 2.84] for a sleep disorder related to nightmares (p = 0.012). Women need more time to reach a state of alertness after getting up (p = 0.022), and there was an interaction between sex and the alertness factor when evaluating the subjective quality of sleep (p = 0.030). Women show worse sleep quality and a higher frequency and propensity for suffering nightmares. When considering the relationship between sleep quality and academic performance, it is observed that students with poor sleep quality obtain lower academic scores (M = 7.21, SD = 0.805) than those with good sleep quality (M = 7.32, SD = 0.685), an effect that reaches significance (t = 2.116, p = 0.035). Regarding the relationship between the categorized chronotype and academic performance, students with a morning chronotype achieve better academic results (M = 7.41, SD = 0.89) than their evening counterparts (M = 7.15, SD = 0.76), although these differences have a small effect size (d = 0.31). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cognitive and Emotional Effects of Sleep Deprivation)
Article
Insomnia in Schizophrenia Patients: Prevalence and Quality of Life
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1350; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17041350 - 19 Feb 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1908
Abstract
Sleep disorders are often not regarded as an important health problem, despite their impact on heath. Insomnia is the most frequent sleep disorder in mental health. The aim is to quantify the prevalence of insomnia in a population with schizophrenic disorder and assess [...] Read more.
Sleep disorders are often not regarded as an important health problem, despite their impact on heath. Insomnia is the most frequent sleep disorder in mental health. The aim is to quantify the prevalence of insomnia in a population with schizophrenic disorder and assess its influence on quality of life. This is a descriptive, analytical and cross-sectional study conducted in a sample of 267 schizophrenic patients over 18 years of age using consecutive non-probabilistic sampling. The variables of interest were collected by means of the "Cuestionario Oviedo de Sueño," "Insomnia Severity Index" and EuqoQol-5D. The estimation of insomnia in our schizophrenic population according to the International Classification of Disease (ICD-10) criteria was 23.2%. The likelihood of insomnia when there are problems in the quality of life is significant in all its dimensions: mobility OR: 3.54 (95% CI 1.88– 6.65), self-care OR: 2.69 (95% CI 1.36–5.32), usual activities OR: 3.56 (95% CI 1.97–6.44), pain/discomfort OR: 4.29 (95% CI 2.37–7.74) and anxiety/depression OR: 3.01 (95% CI 1.61–5.65). The prevalence of insomnia fluctuates depending on the diagnostic criteria; however, the schizophrenic population shows high prevalence in some clinical characteristics. People with insomnia have a lower quality of life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cognitive and Emotional Effects of Sleep Deprivation)
Article
A Correlational Analysis of the Relationships among Intolerance of Uncertainty, Anxiety Sensitivity, Subjective Sleep Quality, and Insomnia Symptoms
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(18), 3253; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16183253 - 05 Sep 2019
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 3204
Abstract
In this study, we used structural equation modeling to investigate the interplay among Intolerance of Uncertainty (IU), Anxiety Sensitivity (AS), and sleep problems. Three hundred undergraduate students completed the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale, the Intolerance of Uncertainty Inventory, the Anxiety Sensitivity Index, the [...] Read more.
In this study, we used structural equation modeling to investigate the interplay among Intolerance of Uncertainty (IU), Anxiety Sensitivity (AS), and sleep problems. Three hundred undergraduate students completed the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale, the Intolerance of Uncertainty Inventory, the Anxiety Sensitivity Index, the Beck Depression Inventory, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Insomnia Severity Index. 68% and 40% of the students reported poor sleep quality or sub-threshold insomnia problems, respectively. Depression and anxiety levels were above the cut-off for about one-fourth of the participants. Structural equation modeling revealed that IU was strongly associated with AS, in turn influencing both insomnia severity and sleep quality via depression and anxiety. Significant indirect effects revealed that an anxious pathway was more strongly associated with insomnia severity, while a depression pathway was more relevant for worsening the quality of sleep. We discussed the results in the frameworks of cognitive models of insomnia. Viewing AS and IU as antecedents of sleep problems and assigning to AS a pivotal role, our study suggested indications for clinical interventions on a population at risk for sleep disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cognitive and Emotional Effects of Sleep Deprivation)
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Review

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Review
Later School Start Time: The Impact of Sleep on Academic Performance and Health in the Adolescent Population
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2574; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072574 - 09 Apr 2020
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3633
Abstract
The crucial role of sleep in physical and mental health is well known, especially during the developmental period. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in examining the relationship between sleep patterns and school performance in adolescents. At this stage of [...] Read more.
The crucial role of sleep in physical and mental health is well known, especially during the developmental period. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in examining the relationship between sleep patterns and school performance in adolescents. At this stage of life, several environmental and biological factors may affect both circadian and homeostatic regulation of sleep. A large part of this population does not experience adequate sleep, leading to chronic sleep restriction and/or disrupted sleep–wake cycles. Studies investigating the effects of different sleep–wake schedules on academic achievement showed that impaired sleep quality and quantity are associated with decreased learning ability and compromised daytime functioning. This review focuses on the most recent studies that evaluated the effects of modified school start time on sleep patterns and related outcomes. Moreover, based on the available empirical evidence, we intend to propose a direction for future studies targeted to implement prevention or treatment programs by modifying sleep timing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cognitive and Emotional Effects of Sleep Deprivation)

Other

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Brief Report
Sleep Quality and Psychological Status in a Group of Italian Prisoners
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(12), 4224; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17124224 - 13 Jun 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 884
Abstract
Prison could be considered a prolonged stressful situation that can trigger not only a dysregulation of sleep patterns but can also bring out psychiatric illness, such as anxiety and depression symptoms. Our study is aimed at exploring sleep quality and sleep habits in [...] Read more.
Prison could be considered a prolonged stressful situation that can trigger not only a dysregulation of sleep patterns but can also bring out psychiatric illness, such as anxiety and depression symptoms. Our study is aimed at exploring sleep quality and sleep habits in an Italian prison ward with three different security levels, and to attempt to clarify how anxiety state and the total time spent in prison can moderate insomnia complaints. There were 129 participants divided into three groups who enrolled in this study: 50 were in the medium-security prison ward (Group 1), 58 were in the high-security prison ward (Group 2) and 21 were in the medium-security following a protocol of detention with reduced custodial measures (Group 3). All participants filled in a set of questionnaires that included the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-2), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Based on their responses, we observed that all participants showed poor sleep quality and insomnia, mild to moderate depressive symptoms that tended to a higher severity in Groups 1 and 3, and the presence of clinically significant anxiety symptoms, mainly in Groups 1 and 3. Our study shows that increased anxiety state-level and the presence of mood alteration corresponds to an increase in both poor sleep quality and, more specifically, insomnia complaints. Finally, we propose that TiP (total time in prison) could have an interesting and stabilizing paradox-function on anxiety state and insomnia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cognitive and Emotional Effects of Sleep Deprivation)
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