Special Issue "Sleep Quality and Health-Related Outcomes"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Hiroshi Kadotani
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychiatry, Shiga University of Medical Science, Seta Tsukinowa-cho, Otsu City, Shiga, 520-2192, Japan
Interests: epidemiology; sleep medicine; outcome research; quality of life; patient-reported outcomes
Dr. Misa Takegami
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiologic Informatics, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, 6-1 Kishibeshinmachi, Suita, Osaka 564-8565, Japan
Interests: epidemiology; sleep medicine; outcome research; quality of life; patient reported outcome

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

It is widely accepted that insufficient and poor-quality sleep are high-risk factors for health outcomes such as diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension cardiovascular disease, malignant neoplasm, and cerebrovascular disease. It also has deleterious effects on quality of life, cognitive performance, and workplace productivity and accidents. Given the potential adverse effects of insufficient and poor-quality sleep on health, wellbeing and productivity, the consequences of sleep-deprivation have far-reaching societal and economic consequences.

However, most previous studies on interactions between health-related outcomes and sleep have not analyzed “sleep quality” and mainly focused on “sleep duration”. Recently, it became possible to monitor “sleep quality” with wearable devices and portable electroencephalography devices.

We would like to accept studies on both subjective and objective measurements of “sleep quality” using interviews, questionnaires, portable monitors, wearable devices, etc. Studies on outcomes of “sleep quality” or intervention on “sleep quality” are very welcome. Methodology reports to develop or evaluate new metrics, devices, or algorithms are also welcome. Such studies will eventually contribute to health and wellbeing.

Prof. Dr. Hiroshi Kadotani
Dr. Misa Takegami
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • sleep medicine
  • sleep research
  • mental health
  • insomnia
  • epidemiology
  • portable monitors
  • questionnaire
  • method comparison
  • wearable device

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
Sleep Debt and Social Jetlag Associated with Sleepiness, Mood, and Work Performance among Workers in Japan
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 2908; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18062908 - 12 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 653
Abstract
Although sleep debt and social jetlag (SJL) influence daytime dysfunctions, the effects of both sleep debt and SJL on them have not been analyzed. The aim of this study was to examine the mutual relationship between sleep debt and SJL on daytime sleepiness, [...] Read more.
Although sleep debt and social jetlag (SJL) influence daytime dysfunctions, the effects of both sleep debt and SJL on them have not been analyzed. The aim of this study was to examine the mutual relationship between sleep debt and SJL on daytime sleepiness, mood, and work performance. This study was a cross-sectional study on sleep health conducted on the Japanese general population. A total of 4505 general workers (30% female, aged 43.57 ± 11.63 years) were selected and analyzed. Sleep debt was defined by sleep debt index (SDI), which is the discrepancy between desired and real sleep duration. SJL and SDI scores exhibited a positive but weak coefficient (r = 0.19). In a 4 (SJL) × 3 (SDI) two-way ANOVA, the interaction effects were notable for sleepiness and depression scores, while the group effects were notable for the work performance score. For sleepiness and depression scores, SDI >2 h was not significantly different from SJL. In addition, the impact of SDI was higher than that of SJL on sleepiness (β = 0.17), depression (β = 0.16), and work performance (β = −0.10). The impact of sleep debt was more pronounced than SJL on daytime dysfunctions, although both sleep debt and SJL have negative impacts on them. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Quality and Health-Related Outcomes)
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Article
Self-Isolation Due to COVID-19 Is Linked to Small One-Year Changes in Depression, Sleepiness, and Insomnia: Results from a Clinic for Sleep Disorders in Shiga Prefecture, Japan
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 8971; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17238971 - 02 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1167
Abstract
We aimed to analyze (a) the changes in depression, sleepiness, insomnia, and sleep habits in relation to the degree of self-isolation and (b) the effects of changes in sleep habits and social interactions on depression, insomnia, and sleepiness during the coronavirus disease 2019 [...] Read more.
We aimed to analyze (a) the changes in depression, sleepiness, insomnia, and sleep habits in relation to the degree of self-isolation and (b) the effects of changes in sleep habits and social interactions on depression, insomnia, and sleepiness during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. We enrolled 164 patients who visited the sleep outpatient clinic in Shiga University of Medical Science Hospital. We compared the sleep habits, depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9: PHQ-9), insomnia (Athens Insomnia Scale: AIS), and sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale: ESS) of patients during the period from April to July 2019 vs. May 2020 (a period of self-isolation due to COVID-19). A Wilcoxon signed-rank test indicated no significant differences in PHQ-9, ESS, and AIS scores between 2019 and 2020 within both the strong self-isolation group and no/little self-isolation group. With respect to sleep habits, earlier bedtime (p = 0.006) and increased sleep duration (p = 0.014) were found in the strong self-isolation group. The former (p = 0.009) was also found in the no/little self-isolation group, but we found significant differences in sleep duration between the no/little self-isolation group and the strong self-isolation group (p = 0.047). Therefore, self-isolation due to COVID-19 had relatively small one-year effects on depression, sleepiness, and insomnia in a clinical population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Quality and Health-Related Outcomes)
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Article
Evaluation of Severity Levels of the Athens Insomnia Scale Based on the Criterion of Insomnia Severity Index
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 8789; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17238789 - 26 Nov 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 932
Abstract
The Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS) can be regarded as a highly useful instrument in both clinical and research settings, except for when assessing the severity level. This study aims to determine the severity criteria for AIS by using the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). [...] Read more.
The Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS) can be regarded as a highly useful instrument in both clinical and research settings, except for when assessing the severity level. This study aims to determine the severity criteria for AIS by using the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). A total of 1666 government employees aged 20 years or older were evaluated using the AIS and ISI, the Patient Health Questionnaire for depressive symptoms, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale for daytime sleepiness, and the Short Form Health Survey of the Medical Outcomes Study for health-related quality of life (QoL). A significant positive correlation (r) was found between the AIS and the ISI (r = 0.80, p < 0.001). As a result of describing receiver–operator curves, the severity criteria of the AIS are capable of categorizing insomnia severity as follows: absence of insomnia (0–5), mild insomnia (6–9), moderate insomnia (10–15), and severe insomnia (16–24). In addition, compared to all scales across groups categorized by AIS or ISI, it was revealed that similar results could be obtained (all p < 0.05). Therefore, the identification of the severity of AIS in this study is important in linking the findings of epidemiological studies with those of clinical studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Quality and Health-Related Outcomes)
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Article
Sleep Health Promotion in the Workplace
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 7952; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17217952 - 29 Oct 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 745
Abstract
Poor sleep and sleepiness in the workplace are associated with accidents. A workplace sleep health promotion program was implemented in an Italian police unit. Of the 242 police officers in the unit, 218 (90%) agreed to take part in the program. A crossover [...] Read more.
Poor sleep and sleepiness in the workplace are associated with accidents. A workplace sleep health promotion program was implemented in an Italian police unit. Of the 242 police officers in the unit, 218 (90%) agreed to take part in the program. A crossover trial was made in which the police officers were divided into two groups that performed sleep health promotion activities in the first and second year, respectively. The first group of officers showed significant sleep improvements at the end of the first year, while the second group had similar or worse parameters than at baseline. At follow-up, a significant improvement in the quantity and quality of sleep was reported in both groups. Sleep improvements at follow-up were associated with a marked reduction in the frequency of accidents at work and near-misses. Before the intervention, sleepiness was the best predictor of injuries (aOR 1.220; CI95% 1.044–1.426) and near-misses (aOR 1.382; CI95% 1.182–1.615). At follow-up, when sleep conditions had improved, insomnia symptoms were the most significant predictors of work accidents (aOR 13.358; CI95% 2.353–75.818). Sleep health promotion can be useful in police officers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Quality and Health-Related Outcomes)

Review

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Review
The Effects of Milk and Dairy Products on Sleep: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9440; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17249440 - 16 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1189
Abstract
Several studies have assessed the effects of milk and dairy product intake on sleep quality and duration. Such investigations have varied in terms of their geographic locations, amounts of milk and dairy products, study participants (age, sex, race), and study designs. The present [...] Read more.
Several studies have assessed the effects of milk and dairy product intake on sleep quality and duration. Such investigations have varied in terms of their geographic locations, amounts of milk and dairy products, study participants (age, sex, race), and study designs. The present study aimed to summarize this literature and provide a unified view on whether the intake of milk and dairy products affects sleep quality. This systematic review was conducted according to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. The following keywords were chosen as electronic database search items from MeSH (medical subject headings) terms and descriptors in health sciences (DeHS) lists: milk, yogurt, dairy product, cheese, sleep, human, observational study, and interventional study. As a result, a total of 14 studies published between 1972 and 2019 were included in this review, including eight randomized controlled trials, two experimental studies with cross-over designs, one longitudinal study, and three cross-sectional studies. Four studies targeted older adults, three included toddlers, two targeted children, and six enrolled adults inclusive of university students. Overall, these studies indicated that a well-balanced diet that includes milk and dairy products is effective in improving sleep quality, despite mixed results across studies attributable to differences in study populations and methods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Quality and Health-Related Outcomes)
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