Special Issue "Sports Science With Children’s Lifestyle, Physical Fitness"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Sport and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 November 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Hyunshik Kim
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Physical Education, Sendai University, Miyagi 9891693, Japan
Interests: lifestyle; physical fitness; fundamental movement skills; physical activity; sleep duration; screen time; sedentary behavior; 24-hour movement guideline; health‑related quality; urban, rural; Isotemporal Substitution Analysis
Dr. Jiameng Ma
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Physical Education, Sendai University, Shibata 9891693, Japan
Interests: lifestyle; physical fitness; fundamental movement skills; physical activity; sleep duration; screen time; sedentary behavior; 24-hour movement guideline; health‑related quality; urban, rural; Isotemporal Substitution Analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Early childhood is a time of rapid physical and mental development, during which time a child's lifestyle habits are formed, and changes and adaptations are made to the environment. To maintain and promote the optimal health status of preschool children, it is important to increase physical activity, reduce screen time, and ensure sufficient sleep duration within each 24-h period. There has been increasing interest in obtaining strong evidence supporting the interaction between these movement-related behaviors over 24-h and the effect on health.As an essential human skill, locomotion is the main instrument by which individuals interact with the external environment, and it plays a dual role in ensuring individuals’ survival and development. For children, gross motor skills are the earliest-developed motor skills, and their development is beneficial to their physical health, mental cognition, and social adaptation. motor skills play an important role in preschoolers′ growth, development, and formation of an active lifestyle. Therefore, the study of the promotion of physical activity, Improvement of sleep quality, and reducing sedentary behavior to Improvement of physical fitness has become an emerging trend in the field, as more and more researchers have conducted investigations in this area of inquiry. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Lifestyle and physical fitness
  • Lifestyle and fundamental movement skills
  • Isotemporal Substitution Analysis and lifestyle
  • Physical activity, sleep duration, and screen time
  • Body composition, and physical fitness
  • 24-hour movement guideline
  • Lifestyle and health‑related quality of life in children
  • The difference in physical fitness between urban and rural areas

We want to encourage all investigators who work in this field to submit original research, reviews, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses to this Special Issue to broaden our knowledge and open new research directions.

Dr. Hyunshik Kim
Dr. Jiameng Ma
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • lifestyle
  • physical fitness
  • fundamental movement skills
  • physical activity
  • sleep duration
  • screen time
  • sedentary behavior
  • 24-hour movement guideline
  • health‑related quality
  • urban
  • rural
  • Isotemporal Substitution Analysis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
The Association of Smartphone Usage Duration with Physical Fitness among Chinese University Students
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(1), 572; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph19010572 - 05 Jan 2022
Viewed by 146
Abstract
Background: The use of smartphones has become increasingly prevalent in recent years, especially among the youth. However, smartphone overuse has been reported to be related to several negative mental and physical health outcomes. Although the association between smartphone use and physical fitness has [...] Read more.
Background: The use of smartphones has become increasingly prevalent in recent years, especially among the youth. However, smartphone overuse has been reported to be related to several negative mental and physical health outcomes. Although the association between smartphone use and physical fitness has been investigated in several studies, these studies only focused on specific elements of physical fitness, such as grip strength. In addition, evidence on young adults is limited. Thus, this study aimed to examine the association between the duration of smartphone use and physical fitness among Chinese university students. Methods: A total of 11,242 university students volunteered to participate in the study. The duration of smartphone use was assessed using a self-reported questionnaire. Physical fitness tests consisted of a 50-m sprint and vital capacity tests for both sexes, a 1000-m run and pull-up test for male students, and an 800-m run and sit-up test for female students. Results: The duration of smartphone use among the participants was 5.4 h/day for male students and 6.1 h/day for female students on average. After adjusting for confounding factors, in male students, a long duration of smartphone use was significantly associated with a slow 50 m sprint and 1000 m run time, lower pull-up times, and poor vital capacity (p = 0.004, 0.002, 0.002 and 0.040, respectively). In female students, a long duration of smartphone use was associated with a slow 800 m run time (p < 0.001). Conclusion: This study found that longer duration of smartphone use was associated with lower physical fitness among Chinese university students. The duration of smartphone use may be an influencing factor for physical fitness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Science With Children’s Lifestyle, Physical Fitness)
Article
Effects of 40% of Maximum Oxygen Uptake Intensity Cycling Combined with Blood Flow Restriction Training on Body Composition and Serum Biomarkers of Chinese College Students with Obesity
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(1), 168; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph19010168 - 24 Dec 2021
Viewed by 425
Abstract
Blood flow restriction training (BFRT) is a new method for promoting muscle growth and improving muscle function, even with relatively low-intensity exercise. BFRT on patients with obesity has not been extensively studied. This study aimed to analyze the effects of cycling at 40% [...] Read more.
Blood flow restriction training (BFRT) is a new method for promoting muscle growth and improving muscle function, even with relatively low-intensity exercise. BFRT on patients with obesity has not been extensively studied. This study aimed to analyze the effects of cycling at 40% of maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) combined with BFRT on body composition and serum biomarkers among college students with obesity. This pilot study included thirty-seven male college students with obesity aged 18–22 years (experimental group (EG): n = 18; control group (CG): n = 19). The EG conducted 40% VO2max cycling combined with BFRT activities and the CG conducted 40% VO2max cycling without BFRT two times per week for 12 weeks. Our results showed that in EG, there were significant differences in weight, thigh skinfold thickness (TS), waist circumference, abdominal skinfold thickness, fat mass, body fat percentage, body mass index and glucose (GLU), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels before and after the experiment (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, and p < 0.001). After the experiment, TS, GLU, TC, HDL-C, and LDL-C in EG were significantly different than those of the CG (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, and p < 0.001). Together, our results demonstrate that cycling at 40% VO2max combined with BFRT may improve body composition and blood lipid profile of male college students with obesity. Our findings have important implications for those who cannot perform moderate- and high-intensity exercises. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Science With Children’s Lifestyle, Physical Fitness)
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