Special Issue "Suicide and Depression in the Elderly"

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sung-In Jang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722, Korea
2. Institute of Health Services Research, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722, Korea
Interests: preventive medicine; public health; health policy; health system; elder population; depression; suicide
Dr. Suk-Yong Jang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, Eulji University, Daejeon, Korea
Interests: preventive medicine; medical law & ethics; health policy and management; ecudation of medical humanities; suicide prevention
Dr. Hyun Kyu Kim
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Korea
2. Severance Hospital, Seoul, South Korea
Interests: adult psychiatry; mental health policy; depression; schizophrenia; suicide prevention

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Depression and suicide in the elderly population are not only leading causes of death worldwide, but these issues have also seen significant increases. In the 2018 OECD statistics, the suicide mortality rate among the elderly (over 65) was 18.8 per 100,000 people, and the proportion of older individuals with suicide attempts or suicides was also high. Furthermore, several epidemiological surveys of depression showed that the prevalence of elderly depression was from 15% to 35% among elders (age over 65). As the world is entering into an aging society, it is necessary to prepare for increasing suicide and depression in older adults.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to share insights regarding the risk factors, current status, and various policies for preventing depression and suicide in the elderly population. In this Special Issue, interested authors are invited to contribute their research in the field of suicide and depression in the elderly. Research topics may include:

  • Various risk factors, including socio-economic factors, physical factors, genetic factors, or other psychiatric factors, including dementia;
  • The current state of mental health in the elderly, including social effects and costs of suicide and depression;
  • Suggestions on policies to reduce suicide and depression in elderly populations—for instance, the effectiveness of policies and programs implemented.

Studies involving the following keywords are welcome for this Special issue in IJERPH.

Dr. Sung-In Jang
Dr. Suk-Yong Jang
Dr. Hyun Kyu Kim
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • depression
  • suicide
  • elderly
  • risk factors
  • chronic disease
  • socioeconomic factors
  • suicide prevention
  • health policy

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
The Impact of Transitions in Caregiving Status on Depressive Symptoms among Older Family Caregivers: Findings from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 42; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18010042 - 23 Dec 2020
Viewed by 759
Abstract
This study identifies the effects of transitions in caregiving status on depressive symptoms among middle-aged or older adults who care for family members with limitations in activities of daily living (ADL). Data were collected from the 2006–2018 Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging. A [...] Read more.
This study identifies the effects of transitions in caregiving status on depressive symptoms among middle-aged or older adults who care for family members with limitations in activities of daily living (ADL). Data were collected from the 2006–2018 Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging. A total of 7817 subjects were included. On the basis of their caregiving status transition, participants were categorized into four groups: started caregiving, continued caregiving, stopped caregiving, and noncaregivers. Depressive symptoms were measured using the 10 item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Analysis using a generalized estimating equation model and subgroup analyses were conducted. Compared to noncaregivers, women who started caregiving showed more depressive symptoms in the following year (β 0.761, p < 0.0001). Regardless of sex, older adults who continued caregiving had more depressive symptoms than noncaregivers did (β 0.616, p < 0.0277 in men, and β 1.091, p < 0.0001 in women). After relinquishing caregiving responsibilities to other caregivers, participants’ depressive symptoms in the following year showed no statistically significant difference from that of noncaregivers. Thus, starting or continuing caregiving was associated with increased depressive symptoms, and those symptoms could be normalized by stopping caregiving. Intervention strategies to reduce family caregivers’ depressive symptoms are needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Suicide and Depression in the Elderly)
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