Special Issue "Telemedicine in the Era of COVID-19"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Digital Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Giulio Nittari
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Telemedicine and Telepharmacy Center, School of Medicinal and Health Products Sciences, University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino, Italy
Interests: telemedicine; pharmacy; telepharmacy; overweight/obesity; chronic diseases; non-communicable diseases; public health; ethical and legal challenges and COVID-19

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus causing the deadly coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is a member of a large family of viruses—coronaviruses—that cause various diseases of the pulmonary system ranging from the common cold to severe respiratory syndromes such as the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). COVID-19 afflicts all age groups; in particular, 95% of deaths have occurred in people over the age of 60. In preventing this COVID-19 deadly pandemic, telemedicine can help by enabling mildly ill patients to receive the supportive care they need while minimizing their exposure to other seriously ill patients. Hence, in promoting telemedicine during the COVID-19 era, it is important to reduce the spread of viruses and support public health measures. In this Special Issue, the management of patients with COVID-19 and how to reduce the infection rate using telemedicine technology are discussed. Therefore, an evidence-based prevention strategy is essential to reduce mortality and morbidity due to the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly through the use of telemedicine technologies.

Dr. Giulio Nittari
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • SARS-CoV-2
  • digital health
  • digital medicine
  • public health
  • surveillance
  • telehealth
  • telemedicine

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Following the COVID-19 Experience, Many Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Wish to Use Telemedicine in a Hybrid Format
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(21), 11309; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph182111309 - 28 Oct 2021
Viewed by 515
Abstract
Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has brought to light both challenges and unique opportunities regarding type 1 diabetes (T1D) management, including the usage of telemedicine platforms. Methods: This study was conducted in a tertiary hospital diabetes clinic. All consecutive T1D patients during March and [...] Read more.
Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has brought to light both challenges and unique opportunities regarding type 1 diabetes (T1D) management, including the usage of telemedicine platforms. Methods: This study was conducted in a tertiary hospital diabetes clinic. All consecutive T1D patients during March and June 2021 were asked to fill out a structured anonymous questionnaire that aimed to determine their preference regarding continuous use of a virtual platform. Results: In total, 126 T1D patients answered the questionnaire, of whom 51% were under the age of 40, half were men, half used insulin pumps, and 69% used continuous glucose monitoring. During the pandemic, the exposure of patients to virtual visits has grown about twofold, from 29% to 53%. Of the respondents, 49% expressed an interest in future usage of a virtual platform, but most of them preferred use in a hybrid manner. We found an association between preference to use telemedicine in the future and younger age, previous virtual platform experience, and confidence in being able to download data. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate that the COVID-19 experience has led to a growing interest of T1D patients in using the hybrid format of telemedicine. However, we still need to better understand who will benefit most from this platform and assess its cost-effectiveness and organization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Telemedicine in the Era of COVID-19)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Telemedicine and eHealth Literacy in the Era of COVID-19: A Cross-Sectional Study in a Peripheral Clinic in Israel
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(18), 9556; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18189556 - 10 Sep 2021
Viewed by 714
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic mandating isolation, quarantine, and social distancing has accelerated and expanded the use of telemedicine. This study examines the extent of the use of telemedicine and the relationship between eHealth literacy and satisfaction with using telemedicine during the pandemic. A total [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic mandating isolation, quarantine, and social distancing has accelerated and expanded the use of telemedicine. This study examines the extent of the use of telemedicine and the relationship between eHealth literacy and satisfaction with using telemedicine during the pandemic. A total of 156 participants from a clinic in a peripheral community in southern Israel completed an online questionnaire. We found that 85% knew how to use the internet for health information, but only one third felt safe using it to make health decisions. Furthermore, 93% used the internet for technical needs, such as renewing prescriptions or making a doctor’s appointment. Even lower use for telemedicine was found (38%) for consultation or treatment sessions. A positive association was found between eHealth literacy and satisfaction variables with using telemedicine (rp = 0.39, p < 0.001). Although respondents understood the benefits of telemedicine, they were not satisfied nor interested in online sessions after the epidemic’s end, preferring a meeting involving personal interaction. Young people and academics benefit more from telemedicine, thereby creating usage gaps and potentially increasing existing inequality. We recommend developing intervention programs, especially among vulnerable populations, to strengthen eHealth literacy and remove barriers causing skepticism about the use of telemedicine during and after the pandemic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Telemedicine in the Era of COVID-19)

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Perspectives on Telemedicine during the Era of COVID-19; What Can Saudi Arabia Do?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(20), 10617; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph182010617 - 11 Oct 2021
Viewed by 484
Abstract
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has represented a challenge to medical practice in Saudi Arabia and worldwide. In contrary to the increasing numbers of COVID-19 patients, there was a limitation in the capacity of medical practices and access to healthcare. A growing [...] Read more.
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has represented a challenge to medical practice in Saudi Arabia and worldwide. In contrary to the increasing numbers of COVID-19 patients, there was a limitation in the capacity of medical practices and access to healthcare. A growing body of evidence from healthcare settings in Saudi Arabia and worldwide has suggested a possible role for telemedicine in responding to this evolving need. Telemedicine can be used for triage, direct care, follow-up, and consultation. It could be delivered through synchronous, asynchronous, and mixed approaches. While telemedicine has several advantages, such as accessibility and cost-effectiveness, its diagnostic reliability should be further investigated. The Saudi Vision (2030) has drawn up a roadmap to invest in digital healthcare during the coming decade; however, some barriers related to using telemedicine in Saudi healthcare settings, including cultural issues and technical difficulties, should be openly discussed. In addition, before putting telemedicine in practice on a wide scale in Saudi Arabia, more efforts should be carried out to issue updated legislation and regulations, discuss and respond to ethical concerns, and ensure data security. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Telemedicine in the Era of COVID-19)
Back to TopTop