Special Issue "Trauma and Loss"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Myfanwy Maple
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Social Work, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of New England, 2351 Armidale, Australia
Interests: traumatic loss and grief; suicide (prevention, intervention and postvention); mental health and illness; family and community contexts; indigenous issues; rural student education, in particular for social work; qualitative methods, in particular, narrative inquiry
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Sarah Wayland
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Social Work, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of New England, 2351 Armidale, Australia
Interests: suicide; mental health and illness
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Lyndal Bugeja
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Forensic Medicine and Monash Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Clayton VIC 3800, Australia
Interests: injury and violence prevention; forensic medicine; suicide prevention; sexual violence; surveillance of injury and violence

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organising a Special Issue entitled “Trauma and Loss” for the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.

The lived experience of trauma and loss shape the ways in which clinical and non-clinical services respond to the social, emotional and physical wellbeing of individuals. In order to address the ways in which experiences of trauma, and better understand the way people experience loss, as well as opportunities for post traumatic growth and post-traumatic stress, can be enhanced by inclusion of literature that presents multifactorial ways in which trauma and loss are intertwined. Community-based as well as workplace programs, initiatives, and strategies that provide scope to enhance the evidence base and new and innovative clinical and nonclinical programs, with a focus on the inclusion of lived experience, will be encouraged.

This Special Issue is open to any subject area related to trauma, loss, grief, bereavement, as well as crisis and ongoing strategies. We strongly encourage submissions that demonstrate collaborative practices, with people with lived experience of trauma, service providers, and researchers. The listed keywords are noted below.

Prof. Dr. Myfanwy Maple
Dr. Sarah Wayland
Dr. Lyndal Bujega
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Trauma
  • Loss
  • Bereavement
  • Traumatic loss
  • Post-traumatic growth
  • Lived experience

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Prevalence of Suicide Thoughts and Behaviours among Female Garment Workers Who Survived the Rana Plaza Collapse: An In-Depth Inquiry
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6326; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18126326 - 11 Jun 2021
Viewed by 723
Abstract
The Rana Plaza building collapse occurred on 24 April 2013 in Savar, near the capital city of Bangladesh, killing more than 1130 garment workers and injured about 2500, mostly females. Those who survived face ongoing challenges, including socio-cultural constraints, economic hardship, post-traumatic stress [...] Read more.
The Rana Plaza building collapse occurred on 24 April 2013 in Savar, near the capital city of Bangladesh, killing more than 1130 garment workers and injured about 2500, mostly females. Those who survived face ongoing challenges, including socio-cultural constraints, economic hardship, post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD), depression, and critical health issues, which may lead to suicidal ideation and death. The aim of this article is to explore why and how female garment workers who survived the Rana Plaza collapse are now at risk of suicide thoughts and behaviours, and suicide death. Unstructured face-to-face interviews were held from April to July 2018 with 11 female garment workers who survived the Rana Plaza building collapse. Interviews continued until data saturation was reached. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim while simultaneously being translated into English from Bengali/Bangla. Transcripts were coded and thematically analysed. The study found that all participants were living with multiple risk factors of suicidal ideation (including low socio-economic status, poverty, social stigma, psychological distress, and trauma) which the participants directly linked to the collapse of the Rana Plaza building. Our analysis uses the three-step theory of suicide (3ST, Klonsky & May, 2015) to understand female Rana Plaza survivors’ suicide risk. Female survivors’ overall vulnerability requires urgent attention while taking the socio-cultural setting of Bangladesh into account. In addition, a lifelong caring system (combining financial security and free healthcare) needs to be initiated to accommodate the female survivors with mainstream society to avoid possible future suicides. They require long-term social and economic security and psychological support. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trauma and Loss)
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Article
The Experiences of Grief and Personal Growth in University Students: A Qualitative Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1899; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041899 - 16 Feb 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1062
Abstract
Background: Experiencing the death of a close person, especially in emerging adults and students, can have profound effects on the bereaved individual’s life. As most research in this field has focused on negative effects of a loss, little is known about potential positive [...] Read more.
Background: Experiencing the death of a close person, especially in emerging adults and students, can have profound effects on the bereaved individual’s life. As most research in this field has focused on negative effects of a loss, little is known about potential positive effects experienced by bereaved university students. This study investigated the experience of grief and personal growth in a sample of students from The University of Melbourne, Australia. Methods: Semi-structured interviews via Zoom/telephone with bereaved students (n = 14), who were invited to reflect on their loss and any personal growth potentially experienced. Thematic analysis of the data was based on a deductive and inductive approach. Results: The analysis identified four themes: (i) sharing of grief as a coping mechanism, (ii) balance between grief reactions and moving forward in life, (iii) lessons learned and personal growth, and (iv) adopting values from the deceased person and continuing bonds. Conclusions: Participants emphasized personal growth regarding self-perception and philosophical views on life. Following the loss, they preferred peer support, and used formal services only when they had a specific need. The findings indicate the importance of social support for bereaved students, and the complimentary role of peer and professional support. Hence, academic institutions should offer supportive services tailored to both students and professionals to help bereaved students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trauma and Loss)
Article
Emotional Comprehension Is Not Related to Duration of Distress from Daily Life Events
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 459; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18020459 - 08 Jan 2021
Viewed by 785
Abstract
The main aim of this paper is to analyze to what extent insight (i.e., mentalization referring to one’s own mental state) moderates recovering from daily life events. A total of 110 participants (84.5% women; mean age: M = 21.5; SD = 3.2) filled [...] Read more.
The main aim of this paper is to analyze to what extent insight (i.e., mentalization referring to one’s own mental state) moderates recovering from daily life events. A total of 110 participants (84.5% women; mean age: M = 21.5; SD = 3.2) filled in the Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS-24) and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-R), and were interviewed about impairment derived from daily life events (everyday life stresses) during the past year. Multivariate regression models were adjusted for neuroticism, sex, and socioeconomic status to analyze whether different degrees of insight moderated the relationship between the intensity and the duration of emotional distress. Results showed that the global measure of insight did not moderate recovering from daily-life distress. Regarding the subdimensions, attention to emotional reactions was related to an increased duration of distress. Results showed that, against our hypothesis, deeper comprehension of emotional reactions, operationalized here as “true insight”, was not associated to faster recovery. Limitations and recommendations for further studies are discussed considering these results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trauma and Loss)
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Article
“It Changes Your Orbit”: The Impact of Suicide and Traumatic Death on Adolescents as Experienced by Adolescents and Parents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9356; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17249356 - 14 Dec 2020
Viewed by 1460
Abstract
Background: Having someone close die through suicide or another form of traumatic death is a distressing event in the lives of adolescents, putting them at risk of grief and mental health ramifications. As most research in this field has been focused on intrapersonal [...] Read more.
Background: Having someone close die through suicide or another form of traumatic death is a distressing event in the lives of adolescents, putting them at risk of grief and mental health ramifications. As most research in this field has been focused on intrapersonal grief reactions, this study aimed to broaden the perspective by exploring the impact of the death through an interpersonal lens. Methods: The study involved individual and group interviews with bereaved adolescents (n = 20) and parents of bereaved adolescents (n = 18), and thematic analysis of the data. Results: The analysis yielded three themes: (i) the death is a life-changing experience, (ii) the death differentiates you from your peers, and (iii) the death impacts on the family system. Conclusions: The study revealed the devastating impact of the deaths on adolescents, their relationships with peers and the family system. Adolescents’ grief must be understood within the context of their agency and their immediate social environment. The findings clearly indicate that support for bereaved adolescents should incorporate the familial context. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trauma and Loss)
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