ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Urban Disaster Resilience and Sustainability"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Rajib Shaw
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Graduate School of Media and Governance, Keio University, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan
Interests: disaster governance; emerging technology; urban resilience; climate change adaptation; risk communication
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Akhilesh Surjan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Emergency and Disaster Management Studies, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0909, Australia
Interests: urban disaster; local governance; climate change

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are rapidly moving towards an urbanized world. Since the landmark year of 2007, when the world urban population surpassed the world rural population, the growth has been exponential. Urban areas have been the growth centers of many countries with economic, social, educational, and innovation opportunities. Urban areas feature strong public–private partnerships with the application of new and emerging technologies. On the other hand, urban areas have gradually become hotspots of disaster, disparity, and disproportionate wealth concentration. Thus, urban areas are often known for the coexistence of contrasts. Achieving urban resilience and sustainable urban development requires a holistic approach covering both ends of the wealth spectrum (rich and poor). The effects of climate change are stronger in urban areas, in terms of both stresses and shocks. The current COVID-19 pandemic has added a new dimension to public health perspectives on the abovementioned urban challenges. Urban resilience is also strongly linked to rural resilience, where urban–rural partnerships and connectivity become important in terms of different types of resources such as water, food, energy, etc. This Special Issue invites papers on different dimensions of urban resilience, linked to disaster and climate change issues as well as biological hazards such as an epidemic or pandemic. The Special Issue will focus on how the sustainable development paradigms are affected by these factors and what are the relationships with urban resilience.

Prof. Rajib Shaw
Prof. Mikio Ishiwatari
Prof. Akhilesh Surjan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Urban disasters
  • Climate change adaptation
  • Urban shocks and stresses
  • Sustainable urban development
  • Urban–rural linkages
  • Public health
  • Urban innovation
  • Public–private partnership
  • Citizen science
  • Emerging technologies

Published Papers (10 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
The Japanese Educational System as an International Model for Urban Resilience
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5794; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115794 - 28 May 2021
Viewed by 944
Abstract
Global cities in the context of accelerated urbanization have to deal with more diverse risk factors than ever before, which highlights the need for a faster and more creative response capacity. Although it is necessary to strengthen technical systems, since they are surrounded [...] Read more.
Global cities in the context of accelerated urbanization have to deal with more diverse risk factors than ever before, which highlights the need for a faster and more creative response capacity. Although it is necessary to strengthen technical systems, since they are surrounded by human systems, individual resilience will help to strengthen the community. The educational system is key to developing the human factor in a world where various systems in global cities are increasingly interconnected, which in turn increases risks. Japan is fostering a culture of disaster risk reduction in both the formal, non-formal, and informal education sectors, in which creativity and autonomy are key competencies. Tokyo is the highest populated metropolitan area globally, and its educational system is the international model for education in disaster risk reduction. Urban areas around the world face similar challenges and experience similar needs. This article addresses the challenges that the human factor faces in large cities and the possibilities of increasing resilience in both individuals and communities through Disaster Resilience Education (DRE), taking the Japanese educational system as a model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Disaster Resilience and Sustainability)
Article
Utilizing Population Distribution Patterns for Disaster Vulnerability Assessment: Case of Foreign Residents in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area of Japan
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 4061; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18084061 - 12 Apr 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1061
Abstract
Foreign residents in Japan are amongst the vulnerable groups at risk to disasters in the country. Improvement is crucial in meeting Japan’s vison of zero casualties in major disaster events. If the case of the 2005 Hurricane Katrina is to offer an insight [...] Read more.
Foreign residents in Japan are amongst the vulnerable groups at risk to disasters in the country. Improvement is crucial in meeting Japan’s vison of zero casualties in major disaster events. If the case of the 2005 Hurricane Katrina is to offer an insight into migrants’ characteristics in mega-disaster situations, then a broader analysis of vulnerabilities is needed to avoid mass casualties should the anticipated megathrust earthquake occur. Hence, this study analyzes the vulnerabilities of foreign residents by utilizing their spatial distribution attributes in the Tokyo metropolitan area. This study uses multiple approaches that combine geographic information systems to analyze secondary and primary datasets. The results reveal that foreign nationals are spatially clustered in some parts of the metropolis, especially within a 7 km radius of Minato city. The densities in these areas alter the earthquake community vulnerability levels from 1.23% to 2.8% and from 5.42% to 13.46%, respectively. Although only 11% of foreign residents are prepared for any disaster, there is a high sense of interaction amongst them and Japanese nationals, which almost eliminates isolation within communities. This study therefore proposes the utilization of some of these attributes in mobilizing specifically targeted evacuation procedures, management of evacuation centers, and disaster risk information dissemination. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Disaster Resilience and Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Disasters without Borders: The Coronavirus Pandemic, Global Climate Change and the Ascendancy of Gradual Onset Disasters
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 3299; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18063299 - 23 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1247
Abstract
Throughout much of its history, the sociological study of human communities in disaster has been based on events that occur rapidly, are limited in geographic scope, and their management understood as phased stages of response, recovery, mitigation and preparedness. More recent literature has [...] Read more.
Throughout much of its history, the sociological study of human communities in disaster has been based on events that occur rapidly, are limited in geographic scope, and their management understood as phased stages of response, recovery, mitigation and preparedness. More recent literature has questioned these concepts, arguing that gradual-onset phenomena like droughts, famines and epidemics merit consideration as disasters and that their exclusion has negative consequences for the communities impacted, public policy in terms of urgency and visibility and for the discipline itself as the analytical tools of sociological research are not brought to bear on these events. We agree that gradual-onset disasters merit greater attention from social scientists and in this paper have addressed the two most significant ongoing disasters that are gradual in onset, global in scope and have caused profound impacts on lives, livelihoods, communities and the governments that must cope with their effects. These disasters are the coronavirus pandemic and global climate change both of which include dimensions that challenge the prevailing definition of disaster. We begin with an examination of the foundational work in the sociological study of a disaster that established a conceptual framework based solely on rapidly occurring disasters. Our focus is on several components of the existing framework for defining and studying disasters, which we term “borders.” These borders are temporal, spatial, phasing and positioning, which, in our view, must be reexamined, and to some degree expanded or redefined to accommodate the full range of disasters to which our globalized world is vulnerable. To do so will expand or redefine these borders to incorporate and promote an understanding of significant risks associated with disaster agents that are gradual and potentially catastrophic, global in scope and require international cooperation to manage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Disaster Resilience and Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Evolving Disaster Response Practices during COVID-19 Pandemic
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 3137; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18063137 - 18 Mar 2021
Viewed by 1148
Abstract
When a disaster occurs during a pandemic, it would be a case of concurrent crises (synonymous to cascading disasters or compounding disasters). The single-hazard approach to disaster response system is not suited for this scenario. As shown from the experiences of the Philippines, [...] Read more.
When a disaster occurs during a pandemic, it would be a case of concurrent crises (synonymous to cascading disasters or compounding disasters). The single-hazard approach to disaster response system is not suited for this scenario. As shown from the experiences of the Philippines, India, Japan, and the Republic of Korea, the conventional single-hazard approach needed to integrate new measures, including basic skills training on handling COVID-19 for disaster responders; additional stockpiles of face coverings, disinfectants, tents, and personal protective equipment (PPE); social distancing at evacuation centers; updating of standard operation procedures (SOPs) and guidelines for disaster response to adapt to the concurrent crises situations. Building on the reports presented by the member countries of Asian Disaster Reduction Center (ADRC), this paper highlights three evolving disaster response practices during the COVID-19 pandemic: (i) digitalization of some aspects of disaster response, including early warning, surveillance, and impact assessment; (ii) dispersed evacuation to enforce social distancing, including other measures such as testing, tracing, and isolating infected individuals; (iii) remote psychological first aid to disaster-impacted individuals who are already experiencing anxieties from the pandemic. Indicative outcomes of the evolving response practices are discussed, including whether these could serve as entry points to transition the disaster response system from a single-hazard approach towards a multihazard approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Disaster Resilience and Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
COVID-19 Impact on SDGs and the Fiscal Measures: Case of Indonesia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 2911; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18062911 - 12 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1818
Abstract
The implications of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic have stretched far beyond human health and wellbeing, causing serious setbacks for the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Although governments worldwide have implemented different fiscal stimulus measures to mitigate the implications of COVID-19, it [...] Read more.
The implications of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic have stretched far beyond human health and wellbeing, causing serious setbacks for the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Although governments worldwide have implemented different fiscal stimulus measures to mitigate the implications of COVID-19, it is important to develop a precise understanding of their focus areas to ensure if the progress of SDGs is on track. For a specific case of Indonesia, this study establishes a thorough understanding of the COVID-19 implications on SDGs, and its fiscal stimulus package through a literature review and semi-formal interviews with the core stakeholders in Indonesia. The study results highlighted that COVID-19 has varyingly affected the progress of all SDGs in Indonesia. Amongst the four pillars of sustainable development in Indonesia, the SDGs on the social and economic development pillars are stated to be the most impacted. As for the fiscal stimulus, it is perceived that it can help maintain the SDGs’ attainment progress to a certain extent, although there are several concerns on its implementation. Deriving lessons from the conducted research, the study puts forward key suggestions for the effective implementation of SDGs in the post-COVID-19 era. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Disaster Resilience and Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
COVID-19 Response in Thailand and Its Implications on Future Preparedness
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 1089; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18031089 - 26 Jan 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3183
Abstract
Thailand has been affected by COVID-19, like other countries in the Asian region at an early stage, and the first case was reported as early as mid-January 2020. Thailand’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic has been guided by the “Integrated Plan for Multilateral [...] Read more.
Thailand has been affected by COVID-19, like other countries in the Asian region at an early stage, and the first case was reported as early as mid-January 2020. Thailand’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic has been guided by the “Integrated Plan for Multilateral Cooperation for Safety and Mitigation of COVID-19”. This paper analyses the health resources in the country and focuses on the response through community-level public health system and legislative measures. The paper draws some lessons on future preparedness, especially with respect to the four priorities of Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction. At the end, the paper puts some key learning for future preparedness. While Thailand’s response to COVID-19 has been effective in limiting the spread of the disease, it falls short at being able to address the multiple dimensions of the crisis such as the economic and social impacts. The socioeconomic sectors have been hardest hit, with significant impact on tourism sectors. Sociopolitical system also plays an important role in governance and decision-making for pandemic responses. The analysis suggests that one opportunity for enhancing resilience in Thailand is to strive for more multilevel governance that engages with various stakeholders and to support grassroots and community-level networks. The COVID-19 pandemic recovery is a chance to recover better while leaving no one behind. An inclusive long-term recovery plan for the various impacted countries needs to take a holistic approach to address existing gaps and work towards a sustainable society. Furthering the Health Emergency Disaster Risk Management (HEDRM) Framework may support a coordinated response across various linked sectors rather than straining one particular sector. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Disaster Resilience and Sustainability)
Article
Allocation of Flood Drainage Rights Based on the PSR Model and Pythagoras Fuzzy TOPSIS Method
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(16), 5821; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17165821 - 11 Aug 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 862
Abstract
To minimize losses caused by flooding of areas in a river basin, flood risk management may sacrifice the interests of some areas. Because of regional differences in natural and urban conditions, rankings of the urgencies of flood drainage rights allocations in different regions [...] Read more.
To minimize losses caused by flooding of areas in a river basin, flood risk management may sacrifice the interests of some areas. Because of regional differences in natural and urban conditions, rankings of the urgencies of flood drainage rights allocations in different regions are of great practical significance to the realization of optimal allocations and reduction of damages. Based on the “pressure–state–response” (PSR) framework, this study designed an index system of flood drainage rights allocations in river basins for the comprehensive consideration of the different attributes of regional societies, environments, and technologies, as well as the differences in the quality of technical management and in the levels of social and economic development. A Pythagoras fuzzy TOPSIS method was used to evaluate the urgencies and determine the management of allocations in different areas. Eight cities in Jiangsu Province in the Huai River Basin were selected as the research objects. The results showed that pressure factors played dominant roles in the degrees of urgency. Among the cities, Nantong had the highest degree, followed by Taizhou, whereas Lianyungang had the lowest. The degrees in the central region of Jiangsu were higher than in the northern region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Disaster Resilience and Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
COVID-19 Lockdown, Food Systems and Urban–Rural Partnership: Case of Nagpur, India
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(16), 5710; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17165710 - 07 Aug 2020
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 3315
Abstract
The globally fast-spreading novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is now testing the abilities of all countries to manage its widespread implications on public health. To effectively contain its impacts, a nation-wide temporary lockdown was enforced in India. The resultant panic buying and stockpiling incidents [...] Read more.
The globally fast-spreading novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is now testing the abilities of all countries to manage its widespread implications on public health. To effectively contain its impacts, a nation-wide temporary lockdown was enforced in India. The resultant panic buying and stockpiling incidents together with spread of misinformation created a sense of food insecurity at local level. This paper discusses a specific case of Nagpur from the worst affected Maharashtra state of India, wherein the urban–rural food supply chains were reportedly disrupted. Based on formal interviews with local government officials, a month-long timeline of COVID-19 outbreak in Nagpur was studied along with the consequent government initiatives for maintaining public health and food supply. While the city residents were confined to their homes, this study then assessed their perceived food security at household level, along with their “Immediate Concerns” and “Key Information Sources”. Through online surveys at two different time intervals, the concerns of “Food and Grocery” were found to be rising, and “Government Apps and Websites” were identified as the most reliable source of information. Based on the research findings, the authors further suggest specific policy recommendations for addressing the immediate and long-term concerns related to food systems in Nagpur. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Disaster Resilience and Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Study of the Allocation of Regional Flood Drainage Rights in Watershed Based on Entropy Weight TOPSIS Model: A Case Study of the Jiangsu Section of the Huaihe River, China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 5020; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17145020 - 13 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 696
Abstract
During the flood season, various regions in a watershed often have flood drainage conflicts, when the regions compete for flood drainage rights (FDR). In order to solve this problem, it is very necessary to study the allocation of FDR among various regions in [...] Read more.
During the flood season, various regions in a watershed often have flood drainage conflicts, when the regions compete for flood drainage rights (FDR). In order to solve this problem, it is very necessary to study the allocation of FDR among various regions in the watershed. Firstly, this paper takes fairness, efficiency and sustainable development as the allocation principles, and comprehensively considers the differences of natural factors, social development factors, economic development factors and ecological environment factors in various regions. Then, an indicator system for allocation of FDR among regions in the watershed is established. Secondly, an entropy weight Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) model is used to construct the FDR allocation model among regions in the watershed. Based on a harmony evaluation model, a harmony evaluation and comparison are carried out on the FDR allocation schemes under three different allocation principles. Finally, taking the Jiangsu section of the Huaihe River watershed as an example, the FDR of eight cities in the watershed are allocated and evaluated to see if the allocation scheme is harmonious. The results show that the allocation scheme of FDR based on the principles of fairness, efficiency and sustainable development has the highest degree of harmony, which can meet the FDR demands in various regions in the watershed, avoid the occurrence of flood drainage conflicts among regions, form an orderly flood drainage situation and promote the harmonious development of the watershed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Disaster Resilience and Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
A Scientometric Review of Urban Disaster Resilience Research
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3677; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18073677 - 01 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1134
Abstract
Natural disasters and human-made disasters are threatening urban areas globally. The resilience capacity of the urban system plays an important role in disaster risk response and recovery. Strengthening urban disaster resilience is also fundamental to ensuring sustainable development. Various practices and research for [...] Read more.
Natural disasters and human-made disasters are threatening urban areas globally. The resilience capacity of the urban system plays an important role in disaster risk response and recovery. Strengthening urban disaster resilience is also fundamental to ensuring sustainable development. Various practices and research for enhancing urban disaster resilience have been carried out worldwide but are yet to be reviewed. Accordingly, this paper gives a scientometric review of urban disaster resilience research by using CiteSpace. The time span (January 2001–January 2021) was selected and divided into three phases based on the number of publications. In addition, according to keyword statistics and clustering results, the collected articles are grouped into four hotspot topics: disaster risk reduction, specific disaster resilience research, resilience assessment, and combination research. The results show that most of the existing research is in the first two categories, and articles in the second and fourth categories both show a high growth rate and could be further research directions. The review indicates that urban disaster resilience is essential for a city’s sustainable development. Moreover, the findings provide scholars a full picture of the existing urban disaster resilience research which can help them identify promising research directions. The findings can also help urban government officials and policymakers review current urban disaster management strategies and make further improvements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Disaster Resilience and Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop