Special Issue "Vaccination Research for Public Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. José Tuells
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Public Health, University of Alicante, Alicante 03690, Spain
Interests: acceptability of vaccines; immunization policies; vaccine pharmacovigilance; vaccine cold chain; vaccine communication; influenza vaccine; HPV vaccine; history of vaccinology Photograph:
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Olivier Epaulard
E-Mail
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of infectious disease, Grenoble-Alps University Hospital, Grenoble, 38043, France
Interests: vaccines; vaccine hesitancy; vaccine for specific populations; sexual health
Dr. Zitta Barrella Harboe
E-Mail
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Pulmonary and Infectious Diseases, Copenahgen University Hospital, North Zealand, Hillerød, DK-3400, Denmark.
Interests: vaccine-preventable diseases in adults and specific groups (immunocompromised, COPD, elderly, hard to reach populations); pneumococcal vaccines

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Considered one of the most effective measures in the field of public health, vaccination has had a notable impact on the control and reduction of morbidity and mortality from communicable diseases. Immunization programs have contributed to the improvement of life expectancy and the well-being of the population, especially among children. There are still many gaps in the field, such as how to better approach specific, susceptible target populations, how to develop vaccines from disease with an important burden, or how to inform and discuss with antivaccine movements. The COVID-19 pandemic has also influenced the field of vaccinology in several aspects; on one hand, the strength of immunization programs is being tested, and some countries already fear that they may not reach the expected vaccination coverage, with the consequent risk of epidemic outbreaks; on the other hand, getting a vaccine against COVID-19 brings other issues to light: Who should be the initial recipients of the vaccine? What logistical problems will arise? Will they be well accepted by the population? Will the administration of this vaccine slow down the implementation of other vaccination programs?

In this Special Issue of IJERPH, we invite you and your colleagues to submit original articles, reviews, comments, or new hypotheses aimed at answering the new challenges in the field of vaccinology.

Prof. Dr. José Tuells
Prof. Olivier Epaulard
Dr. Zitta Barrella Harboe
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Vaccines
  • Vaccine hesitancy
  • Vaccine acceptance
  • COVID-19 vaccines
  • Vaccine coverage
  • Public policies
  • Logistic systems and supply chain
  • Compulsory vaccination
  • Vaccine-preventable diseases outbreaks
  • Indirect effects of vaccines
  • Vaccines for neglected diseases and diseases of poverty

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Using Influenza Vaccination Location Data from the 2018 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) to Expand COVID-19 Vaccination Coverage
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 7753; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18157753 - 22 Jul 2021
Viewed by 301
Abstract
Effective COVID-19 vaccine distribution requires prioritizing locations that are accessible to high-risk target populations. However, little is known about the vaccination location preferences of individuals with underlying chronic conditions. Using data from the 2018 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), we grouped 162,744 [...] Read more.
Effective COVID-19 vaccine distribution requires prioritizing locations that are accessible to high-risk target populations. However, little is known about the vaccination location preferences of individuals with underlying chronic conditions. Using data from the 2018 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), we grouped 162,744 respondents into high-risk and low-risk groups for COVID-19 and analyzed the odds of previous influenza vaccination at doctor’s offices, health departments, community settings, stores, or hospitals. Individuals at high risk for severe COVID-19 were more likely to be vaccinated in doctor’s offices and stores and less likely to be vaccinated in community settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vaccination Research for Public Health)
Article
Willingness to Be Vaccinated against COVID-19 in Spain before the Start of Vaccination: A Cross-Sectional Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(10), 5272; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18105272 - 15 May 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 987
Abstract
Vaccine hesitancy has increased in the past few years, influenced by the socio-cultural differences, political populism, or concerns related to the effectiveness and safety of some vaccines, resulting a feeling of distrust. This feeling can become a barrier against the achievement of the [...] Read more.
Vaccine hesitancy has increased in the past few years, influenced by the socio-cultural differences, political populism, or concerns related to the effectiveness and safety of some vaccines, resulting a feeling of distrust. This feeling can become a barrier against the achievement of the immunity necessary to stop the expansion of COVID-19. The aim of this study was to evaluate the acceptance of the vaccine against COVID-19 in Spain, as well as to identify the factors that have an influence on the concerns and attitudes of people against accepting the vaccine in the months prior to the start of vaccination on December 2020. An online questionnaire was created to obtain information about (1) sociodemographic characteristics; (2) concerns and sources of information about vaccines; and (3) attitudes about vaccination and state of health. A multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify the influencing factors. Of the 2501 participants, 1207 (48.3%) would accept the COVID-19 vaccine, 623 (24.9%) were hesitant, and 671 (26.8%) would reject it. The logistic regression showed that being male, older than 60, married, retired, with a high level of education, or with a leftist political inclination, could increase the probability of accepting the COVID-19 vaccine. Disinformation and the lack of political consensus were the main sources of distrust. The patients with hypertension, immunodepression, hypercholesterolemia, or respiratory disease, or were overweight, showed a greater acceptance to the vaccine, while those with cancer took the longest to accept it. A low acceptance of the vaccine against COVID-19 was observed among the Spanish population in the phase prior to its availability, and the main fears of the population were identified. It is necessary to offer correct and transparent information about these vaccines to reduce the concerns and increase the trust of the population, to thereby guarantee the success of the vaccination campaigns. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vaccination Research for Public Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Sociodemographic, HIV-Related Characteristics, and Health Care Factors as Predictors of Self-Reported Vaccination Coverage in a Nationwide Sample of People Aging with HIV in Germany
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4901; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18094901 - 04 May 2021
Viewed by 791
Abstract
Preventing infectious diseases through vaccination becomes more significant among the growing population of people aging with HIV. Coverage rates for vaccinations and factors associated with vaccination utilization among this population in Germany are unknown. We assessed the coverage of eight recommended vaccinations in [...] Read more.
Preventing infectious diseases through vaccination becomes more significant among the growing population of people aging with HIV. Coverage rates for vaccinations and factors associated with vaccination utilization among this population in Germany are unknown. We assessed the coverage of eight recommended vaccinations in a certain time frame in our convenience sample of 903 people living with HIV aged 50 years and older. We analysed coverage rates and used bivariate and multiple linear regression analyses to identify factors associated with number of reported vaccinations. Coverage rates in our sample ranged between 51.0% for meningococcus disease and 84.6% for the triple vaccination against tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis. All rates were higher compared to the German general population. Seven factors were related to the number of vaccinations in multiple regression analysis: sexual orientation, education, relationship status, CD4 count, time since last visit to HIV specialist, type of HIV specialist, and distance to HIV specialist. Vaccination coverage among people aging with HIV in Germany is high, but not optimal. To improve vaccination uptake, strengthened efforts need to be focused on female and heterosexual male patients, socioeconomically disadvantaged patients, and patients with barriers to access regular HIV care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vaccination Research for Public Health)
Article
Low COVID-19 Vaccine Acceptance Is Correlated with Conspiracy Beliefs among University Students in Jordan
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(5), 2407; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18052407 - 01 Mar 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2460
Abstract
Vaccination to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) emerged as a promising measure to overcome the negative consequences of the pandemic. Since university students could be considered a knowledgeable group, this study aimed to evaluate COVID-19 vaccine acceptance among this group in Jordan. Additionally, [...] Read more.
Vaccination to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) emerged as a promising measure to overcome the negative consequences of the pandemic. Since university students could be considered a knowledgeable group, this study aimed to evaluate COVID-19 vaccine acceptance among this group in Jordan. Additionally, we aimed to examine the association between vaccine conspiracy beliefs and vaccine hesitancy. We used an online survey conducted in January 2021 with a chain-referral sampling approach. Conspiracy beliefs were evaluated using the validated Vaccine Conspiracy Belief Scale (VCBS), with higher scores implying embrace of conspiracies. A total of 1106 respondents completed the survey with female predominance (n = 802, 72.5%). The intention to get COVID-19 vaccines was low: 34.9% (yes) compared to 39.6% (no) and 25.5% (maybe). Higher rates of COVID-19 vaccine acceptance were seen among males (42.1%) and students at Health Schools (43.5%). A Low rate of influenza vaccine acceptance was seen as well (28.8%), in addition to 18.6% of respondents being anti-vaccination altogether. A significantly higher VCBS score was correlated with reluctance to get the vaccine (p < 0.001). Dependence on social media platforms was significantly associated with lower intention to get COVID-19 vaccines (19.8%) compared to dependence on medical doctors, scientists, and scientific journals (47.2%, p < 0.001). The results of this study showed the high prevalence of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy and its association with conspiracy beliefs among university students in Jordan. The implementation of targeted actions to increase the awareness of such a group is highly recommended. This includes educational programs to dismantle vaccine conspiracy beliefs and awareness campaigns to build recognition of the safety and efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vaccination Research for Public Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Knowledge, Beliefs and Attitudes towards the Influenza Vaccine among Future Healthcare Workers in Poland
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 2105; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18042105 - 22 Feb 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 800
Abstract
The flu vaccine is the best treatment for avoiding the flu and its complications. The aim of the study was to evaluate the knowledge of the flu vaccine and attitude towards the influenza vaccine among medical students in four majors of study (Nursing, [...] Read more.
The flu vaccine is the best treatment for avoiding the flu and its complications. The aim of the study was to evaluate the knowledge of the flu vaccine and attitude towards the influenza vaccine among medical students in four majors of study (Nursing, Midwifery, Pharmacy, and Public health) in all years of study. A total number of 1137 subjects took part in the study. Most of the vaccinated students assessed the flu vaccine positively (78.5%, 73.7%, 60.7%, and 65.1%, according to their respective majors) and reported that they did not get the flu during the period of vaccination (90.4%, 92.1%, 87.4%, and 97.7%, respectively). Therefore, 65% of the students of Pharmacy, 78% of Midwifery, and 83% of Nursing who were vaccinated once in the last three years recommended the influenza vaccination, and 100% of all students received a regular vaccination every year. The univariate and multivariate logistic regressions showed that a maximum of four factors had a significant impact on the students’ knowledge of the influenza vaccine. Knowledge about the flu vaccine was the highest among Pharmacy students and lowest among Public health students. Final-year students answered the questions better than the younger ones (p < 0.05). Their place of residence and flu vaccination status also appeared to influence their answers. Although all students demonstrated good knowledge of the flu vaccine and demonstrated positive attitudes towards the vaccine, their rate of immunization was low. Therefore, health promotion programs are needed to improve immunization coverage among medical students who are future healthcare workers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vaccination Research for Public Health)
Back to TopTop