Special Issue "Traffic and Road Safety: Multifactorial Analysis of Driving and Walking Behavioral Style"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Francisco Alonso
E-Mail Website
Chief Guest Editor
Research Institute on Traffic and Road Safety, University of Valencia, C/ Serpis 29, 3rd Floor. 46022 Valencia, Spain
Interests: traffic; transport; mobility; road safety; strategic planning; decision making
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Cristina Esteban
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
INTRAS, University of Valencia, 46022 Valencia, Spain
Interests: traffic; transport; mobility; road safety; gender

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

According to the 2018 Global status report on road safety, launched by the WHO in December 2018, the number of annual road traffic deaths has reached 1.35 million. Road traffic injuries are now the leading killer of people aged 5-29 years. The burden is disproportionately borne by pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists, in particular those living in developing countries.

There are several different factors influencing driving and walking, ranging from those regarding the vehicle itself, to the human factor, to those intimately related to the design of infrastructure and/or traffic regulation (both on a normative and operative level).

Additionally, the ways of moving are experiencing changes in many countries, to the point that we can observe an increase in transportation by bike, due to, among other reasons, the promotion by national and local governments, as well as the appearance of a series of personal mobility vehicles, among which skates particularly stand out.

Hence, this Special Issue aims to collect research experiences performed in different contexts that contribute to obtaining a better knowledge of this topic, and, therefore, researchers are encouraged to submit their papers.

Papers addressing the development and validation of new instruments, as well as the assessment of measures and countermeasures through multidisciplinary approaches, are particularly welcome.

Prof. Francisco Alonso
Prof. Cristina Esteban
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Road traffic injuries
  • Vehicles-human factor-infrastructure-regulations
  • Driving, cycling and walking
  • Personal mobility vehicles
  • Road safety measures and countermeasures

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Conspiracy Beliefs Are Related to the Use of Smartphones behind the Wheel
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 7725; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18157725 - 21 Jul 2021
Viewed by 256
Abstract
The belief in conspiracy theories predicts behaviors related to public health such as the willingness to receive vaccines. This study applies a similar approach to an aspect of road safety: the use of smartphones while driving. A representative sample of 1706 subjects answered [...] Read more.
The belief in conspiracy theories predicts behaviors related to public health such as the willingness to receive vaccines. This study applies a similar approach to an aspect of road safety: the use of smartphones while driving. A representative sample of 1706 subjects answered a series of questions related to what can be regarded as erroneous or conspiracy beliefs against restricting or banning the use of smartphones while driving. The results show that those having such conspiracy beliefs reported a greater use of smartphones behind the wheel. Full article
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Article
Could Road Safety Education (RSE) Help Parents Protect Children? Examining Their Driving Crashes with Children on Board
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3611; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18073611 - 31 Mar 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 633
Abstract
Recent evidence suggests that driving behavior and traffic safety outcomes of parents may be influenced by the extent to which they receive information and education on road safety, as well as the fact of driving with their children on board, which may increase [...] Read more.
Recent evidence suggests that driving behavior and traffic safety outcomes of parents may be influenced by the extent to which they receive information and education on road safety, as well as the fact of driving with their children on board, which may increase their risk perception. However, there are no studies specifically addressing the case of crashes suffered while driving with children. Hence, this study aimed to describe the relationship between road safety education-related variables and parents’ traffic safety outcomes while driving with children on board. For this cross-sectional study, data was retrieved from a sample composed of 165 Spanish parents—all of them licensed drivers—with a mean age of 45.3 years. Through binary logistic regression (logit) analysis, it was found that factors such as gender, having received road safety education (RSE), and having been sanctioned for the performance of risky driving behavior contribute to modulating the likelihood of suffering crashes while driving with children on board. Gender differences showed a riskier status for male parents. In this study, a set of risk factors explaining the involvement in traffic crashes when driving with children as passengers was identified among parents: gender, traffic sanctions, valuation, and exposure to road safety campaigns. Also, substantial limitations in the self-reported degree of received RSE were found, especially considering that risky driving behavior and traffic crash rates with children on board still have a high prevalence among parents. Full article
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