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Special Issue "Alternative Management of Common Musculoskeletal Disorder"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. David Cruz Diaz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Jaén, E-23071 Jaén, Spain
Interests: low back pain; chronic ankle instability; motor control; postural control; neuromuscular training; sensorimotor training; physiotherapy; pilates
Dr. Alfonso Ibañez Vera
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Jaén, E-23071 Jaén, Spain
Interests: electrical stimulation; percutaneous electrolysis; cupping therapy; manual therapy; complementary therapies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Conventional physiotherapy and exercise/training interventions have been widely explored in the management of musculoskeletal disorders. Furthermore, evidence-based clinical practice suggests that the combination of both interventions can lead to the best results. However, the therapeutic approach must respond to the demands of our changing society, especially in this global scenario. The influence of social media, new technological devices, and the access to information of patients require an in-depth exploration of the feasibility of the novel approach in the management of musculoskeletal disorders. 

The main objective of this Special Issue is to provide scientific evidence on new intervention programs whose rapidly spreading popularity, due to social media promotion, is not always supported by scientific literature. The use of some devices or interventions by celebrities draws the attention of millions of people trying to imitate them. Nevertheless, some of these devices or interventions could be dangerous and are not a suitable fit for everyone. In this Special Issue, the accepted manuscripts will contribute to elucidate which of the most popular novel approaches are safe and effective.

Dr. David Diaz
Dr. Alfonso Ibañez Vera
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • spinal disorders
  • chronic ankle instability
  • motor control
  • postural control
  • sensorimotor training
  • therapeutic exercise
  • woman health
  • new technologies
  • electrotherapy

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Short-Term Effects of Balance Training with Stroboscopic Vision for Patients with Chronic Ankle Instability: A Single-Blinded Randomized Controlled Trial
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(10), 5364; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18105364 - 18 May 2021
Viewed by 514
Abstract
Chronic Ankle Instability (CAI) is one of the most common musculoskeletal dysfunctions. Stroboscopic vision (SV) training has been deemed to enhance somatosensorial pathways in this population group; nevertheless, until recently no studies have addressed the additional effects of this treatment option to the [...] Read more.
Chronic Ankle Instability (CAI) is one of the most common musculoskeletal dysfunctions. Stroboscopic vision (SV) training has been deemed to enhance somatosensorial pathways in this population group; nevertheless, until recently no studies have addressed the additional effects of this treatment option to the traditional therapeutic approach. Methods: To evaluate the effectiveness of a partial visual deprivation training protocol in patients with CAI, a randomized controlled trial was carried out. Patients with CAI (n = 73) were randomized into either a balance training, SV training, or a control (no training) group. For participants assigned into training groups, they received 18 training sessions over 6 weeks. The primary outcome was dynamic balance as measured by the Star Excursion Balance Test assessed at baseline and after 6 weeks of intervention. Secondary outcome measures included ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, self-reported instability feeling, and ankle functional status. Results: Better scores in stroboscopic training and balance training groups in all outcome measures were observed in comparison with the control group with moderate to large effect sizes. Stroboscopic training was more effective than neuromuscular training in self-reported instability feeling (cohen’s d = 0.71; p = 0.042) and anterior reach distance of the star excursion balance test (cohen’s d = 1.23; p = 0.001). Conclusions: Preliminary findings from the effects of SV Stroboscopic training in patients with CAI, suggest that SV may be beneficial in CAI rehabilitation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alternative Management of Common Musculoskeletal Disorder)
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Article
The Immediate Effect of Informational Manual Therapy for Improving Quiet Standing and Bodily Pain in University Population
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4940; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18094940 - 06 May 2021
Viewed by 777
Abstract
Background: The Informational Manual Therapy (IMT) is a therapeutic touch. This study aims to assess the effect of IMT on quiet standing, pain and health status in university population. Methods: An experiment was conducted on subjects utilizing a comparative paired analysis both before [...] Read more.
Background: The Informational Manual Therapy (IMT) is a therapeutic touch. This study aims to assess the effect of IMT on quiet standing, pain and health status in university population. Methods: An experiment was conducted on subjects utilizing a comparative paired analysis both before and after the intervention. One IMT session was performed on 57 healthy individuals aged from 18 to 65 years. The primary outcome was quiet standing assessed by the Satel 40 Hz stabilometric force platform. Secondary outcomes were bodily pain assessed by the 36-Item Short Form Survey (SF-36) and health status by EQ-5D-3L. The primary outcome was evaluated before and immediately after treatment. Results: The individuals were divided into 3 age groups, 18–35 (52.6%), 35–50 (29.8%) and 51–65 (17.6%). Statistically significant differences were immediately observed after the session ended when comparing the pre-post quiet stance scores in a number of length parameters: L, Lx, Ly and stabilometry amplitude on Y-axis with eyes open and closed. Significant differences were also found when testing bodily pain (SF-36) and anxiety (5Q-5D-3L). Conclusion: One session of IMT produced positive effects when testing quiet standing with eyes open and eyes closed, as well as a significant reduction in pain and anxiety for those tested. Further research is suggested. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alternative Management of Common Musculoskeletal Disorder)
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Article
Abdominal Expansion versus Abdominal Drawing-In Strategy on Thickness and Electromyography of Lumbar Stabilizers in People with Nonspecific Low Back Pain: A Cross-Sectional Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4487; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18094487 - 23 Apr 2021
Viewed by 651
Abstract
The abdominal expansion (AE) strategy, involving eccentric contraction of the abdominal muscles, has been increasingly used in clinical practices; however, its effects have not been rigorously investigated. This study aimed to investigate the immediate effects of the AE versus abdominal drawing-in (AD) strategy [...] Read more.
The abdominal expansion (AE) strategy, involving eccentric contraction of the abdominal muscles, has been increasingly used in clinical practices; however, its effects have not been rigorously investigated. This study aimed to investigate the immediate effects of the AE versus abdominal drawing-in (AD) strategy on lumbar stabilization muscles in people with nonspecific low back pain (LBP). Thirty adults with nonspecific LBP performed the AE, AD, and natural breathing (NB) strategies in three different body positions. Ultrasonography and surface electromyography (EMG) were, respectively, used to measure the thickness and activity of the lumbar multifidus and lateral abdominal wall muscles. The AE and AD strategies showed similar effects, producing higher EMG activity in the lumbar multifidus and lateral abdominal wall muscles when compared with the NB strategy. All muscles showed higher EMG activity in the quiet and single leg standing positions than in the lying position. Although the AE and AD strategies had similar effects on the thickness change of the lumbar multifidus muscle, the results of thickness changes of the lateral abdominal muscles were relatively inconsistent. The AE strategy may be used as an alternative method to facilitate co-contraction of lumbar stabilization muscles and improve spinal stability in people with nonspecific LBP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alternative Management of Common Musculoskeletal Disorder)
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Article
The Effects of Abdominal Hypopressive Training on Postural Control and Deep Trunk Muscle Activation: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(5), 2741; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18052741 - 08 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 821
Abstract
Background: Abdominal Hypopressive Training (AHT) provides postural improvement, and enhances deep trunk muscle activation. However, until recently, there was a lack of scientific literature supporting these statements. The major purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of AHT on posture control [...] Read more.
Background: Abdominal Hypopressive Training (AHT) provides postural improvement, and enhances deep trunk muscle activation. However, until recently, there was a lack of scientific literature supporting these statements. The major purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of AHT on posture control and deep trunk muscle function. Methods: 125 female participants aged 18–60 were randomly allocated to the Experimental Group (EG), consisting of two sessions of 30 min per week for 8 weeks of AHT, or the Control Group (CG), who did not receive any treatment. Postural control was measured with a stabilometric platform to assess the static balance and the activation of deep trunk muscles (specifically the Transverse Abdominal muscle (TrA)), which was measured by real-time ultrasound imaging. Results: The groups were homogeneous at baseline. Statistical differences were identified between both groups after intervention in the Surface of the Center of Pressure (CoP) Open-Eyes (S-OE) (p = 0.001, Cohen’s d = 0.60) and the Velocity of CoP under both conditions; Open-Eyes (V-OE) (p = 0.001, Cohen´s d = 0.63) and Close-Eyes (V-CE) (p = 0.016, Cohen´s d = 0.016), with the EG achieving substantial improvements. Likewise, there were statistically significant differences between measurements over time for the EG on S-OE (p < 0.001, Cohen´s d = 0.99); V-OE (p = 0.038, Cohen´s d = 0.27); V-CE (p = 0.006, Cohen´s d = 0.39), anteroposterior movements of CoP with Open-Eyes (RMSY-OE) (p = 0.038, Cohen´s d = 0.60) and activity of TrA under contraction conditions (p < 0.001, Cohen´s d = 0.53). Conclusions: The application of eight weeks of AHT leads to positive outcomes in posture control, as well as an improvement in the deep trunk muscle contraction in the female population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alternative Management of Common Musculoskeletal Disorder)
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