Special Issue "The Role of Anthropometry in Sport Performance, Health and Nutrition"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. José Ramón Alvero Cruz
E-Mail Website
Chief Guest Editor
Department of Human Physiology, Histology, Patologic Anatomy and Physical-Sports Education, University of Malaga, Edificio López de Peñalver, Campus de Teatinos, 29071 Malaga, Spain
Interests: anthropometry; sports performance; health; BIA
Prof. Dr. Fernando Alacid
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Education. Health Research Centre, University of Almería, 04120 La Cañada, Almería, Spain
Interests: growth; anthropometry; maturation
Prof. Lorena Correas Gómez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Didactics of Languages, Arts and Sports, Faculty of Education Sciences, University of Malaga, Bulevar Louis Pasteur 25, 29010 Malaga, Spain
Interests: anthropometry; body composition; children & adolescents; growth & maturation; health; performance; predictive models

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

On behalf of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, we are organizing a Special Issue on The Role of Anthropometry in Sport Performance, Health and Nutrition. IJERPH is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes manuscripts in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to https://0-www-mdpi-com.brum.beds.ac.uk/journal/ijerph.

Kinanthropometry is defined as the study of human size, body shape, body proportion, body composition, maturation, and gross function, in order to understand growth, exercise, performance, and nutrition.

This Special Issue is dedicated to covering the areas related to sports and exercise sciences and therapy and health professionals. We are interested in research and review work carried out with people of different levels of physical condition from untrained to highly trained individuals. Different methodological and theoretical approaches are also supported. This Special Issue is open to the topic of “Kinanthropometry: The Link between Anthropometry and Function”. The keywords listed below provide an outline of some of the possible areas of interest.

Prof. José Ramón Alvero Cruz
Prof. Fernando Alacid
Prof. Lorena Correas Gómez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • kinanthropometry
  • anthropometry
  • bioelectrical impedance analysis
  • sports performance, nutrition
  • health
  • growth
  • maturation
  • physical fitness
  • body composition
  • proportionality

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Influence of Anthropometric Characteristics on Ice Swimming Performance—The IISA Ice Mile and Ice Km
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 6766; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18136766 - 24 Jun 2021
Viewed by 451
Abstract
Ice swimming following the rules of IISA (International Ice Swimming Association) is a recent sports discipline starting in 2009. Since then, hundreds of athletes have completed an Ice Mile or an Ice Km in water colder than 5 °C. This study aimed to [...] Read more.
Ice swimming following the rules of IISA (International Ice Swimming Association) is a recent sports discipline starting in 2009. Since then, hundreds of athletes have completed an Ice Mile or an Ice Km in water colder than 5 °C. This study aimed to expand our knowledge about swimmers completing an Ice Mile or an Ice Km regarding the influence of anthropometric characteristics (i.e., body mass, body height, and body mass index, BMI) on performance. We analyzed data from 957 swimmers in the Ice Km (590 men and 367 women) and 585 swimmers in the Ice Mile (334 men and 251 women). No differences were found for anthropometric characteristics between swimmers completing an Ice Mile and an Ice Km although water temperatures and wind chill were lower in the Ice Km than in the Ice Mile. Men were faster than women in both the Ice Mile and Ice Km. Swimming speed decreased significantly with increasing age, body mass, and BMI in both women and men in both the Ice Mile and Ice Km. Body height was positively correlated to swimming speed in women in the Ice Km. Air temperature was significantly and negatively related to swimming speed in the Ice Km but not in the Ice Mile. Water temperature was not associated with swimming speed in men in both the Ice Mile and Ice Km but significantly and negatively in women in Ice Km. In summary, swimmers intending to complete an Ice Mile or an Ice Km do not need to have a high body mass and/or a high BMI to swim these distances fast. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Anthropometry in Sport Performance, Health and Nutrition)
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Article
Bioelectrical Impedance Vector Analysis: A Valuable Tool to Monitor Daily Body Hydration Dynamics at Altitude
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(10), 5455; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18105455 - 20 May 2021
Viewed by 539
Abstract
Bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA) is a method used to estimate variation in body hydration. We assessed the potential of BIVA for monitoring daily body hydration fluctuations in nine healthy, normally active males under matching normoxic (NX) and hypobaric hypoxic (HH) experimental conditions. [...] Read more.
Bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA) is a method used to estimate variation in body hydration. We assessed the potential of BIVA for monitoring daily body hydration fluctuations in nine healthy, normally active males under matching normoxic (NX) and hypobaric hypoxic (HH) experimental conditions. Furthermore, we aimed to investigate whether changes in BIVA may correspond with the development of acute mountain sickness (AMS). Subjects were exposed in a hypobaric chamber to both NX (corresponding to an altitude of 262 m) and HH conditions corresponding to an altitude of 3500 m during two four-day sojourns within which food, water intake and physical activity were controlled. Bioimpedance and body weight measurements were performed three times a day and medical symptoms were assessed every morning using the Lake Louise score (LLS). Total body water (TBW) was also assessed on the last day of both sojourns using the deuterium dilution technique. We detected circadian changes in vector length, indicating circadian body water variations that did not differ between NX and HH conditions (ANOVA effects: time: p = 0.018, eta2 = 0.149; interaction: p = 0.214, eta2 = 0.083; condition: p = 0.920, eta2 = 0.001). Even though none of the subjects developed AMS, four subjects showed clinical symptoms according to the LLS during the first 24 hours of HH conditions. These subjects showed a pronounced (Cohen’s d: 1.09), yet not statistically significant (p = 0.206) decrease in phase angle 6 hours after exposure, which may indicate fluid shift from the intracellular to the extracellular compartment. At the end of each sojourn, vector length correlated with deuterium dilution TBW “gold standard” measurements (linear regression: NX: p = 0.002 and r2 = 0.756, HH: p < 0.001 and r2 = 0.84). BIVA can be considered a valuable method for monitoring body hydration changes at altitude. Whether such changes are related to the development of clinical symptoms associated with AMS, as indicated in the present investigation, must be confirmed in future studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Anthropometry in Sport Performance, Health and Nutrition)
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Article
Morphological and Physical Profile of a Collegiate Water Skier
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 1150; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18031150 - 28 Jan 2021
Viewed by 625
Abstract
This study aimed to examine morphological and physical fitness profile in collegiate water skiers and to identify the potential morphological and physical fitness factors, important for success in the slalom, trick, and jump events. Twenty collegiate water skiers were subject to anthropometric, somatotype [...] Read more.
This study aimed to examine morphological and physical fitness profile in collegiate water skiers and to identify the potential morphological and physical fitness factors, important for success in the slalom, trick, and jump events. Twenty collegiate water skiers were subject to anthropometric, somatotype measurements and a battery of physical tests inclusive of water ski-specific fitness variables. An independent t-test was used to compare the gender differences of dependent variables. Partial correlation and linear regression analyses were used to identify the factors that are associated with water ski performance. Male water skiers were lower in endomorphic component and better in power, speed, and cardiorespiratory fitness than female water skiers (p < 0.05). Somatotype such as mesomorphic (r = −0.48) and ectomorphic components (r = −0.60), sum of hand-grip strength (r = 0.98), and muscular endurance including posterior extension (r = 0.59) and left lateral flexion (r = 0.63) were significantly correlated with water skiing performance score (p < 0.05). The results of regression analyses showed that mesomorphic component (r2 = 0.24, p = 0.04), sum of hand-grip strength (r2 = 0.95, p = 0.001), and muscular endurance (r2 = 0.30, p = 0.03), appear to be crucial factors associated with water ski performance in slalom, trick (hands pass), and the jump events, respectively. Our study suggests that different morphological and fitness components are required to succeed in each tournament water skiing event. Coaches and athletes can utilize the battery of physical tests and design a specialized training regimen for each tournament water skiing event. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Anthropometry in Sport Performance, Health and Nutrition)
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