Special Issue "Antisocial Behavior in Youth: Victims and Offenders"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Adolescents".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Juan García-García
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Health Research Center, Department of Psychology, University of Almeria, 04120 Almeria, Spain
Interests: antisocial behavior; juvenile justice; younger victims and offenders; risk assessment instruments; cognitive reserve; applied psychometrics; meta-analysis; quantitative psychology
Dr. Elena Ortega Campos
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Assistant Guest Editor
Health Research Center, Department of Psychology, University of Almeria, 04120 Almería, Spain
Interests: antisocial behavior; juvenile justice; younger offenders; recidivism; juvenile victims; risk assessment instruments; research methodology; systematic review and meta-analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Antisocial behavior in youth causes greater alarm in society compared to when this type of behavior is carried out by adults. Traditionally, research has been focused on young offenders, with the aim of preventing antisocial behavior from being repeated or becoming chronic. The study of juvenile antisocial behavior should be approached from a dual perspective, with the aim of understanding the risk and protective factors presented by both juvenile offenders and victims. The study of risk and protective factors (promotive and protective) will allow the prevention of antisocial behavior in young people, favoring the non-repetition of this antisocial behavior.

Better knowledge of juvenile antisocial behavior will allow the creation and adaptation of valid, reliable, and sensitive measurement instruments. The development of this type of instrument is essential for the correct identification of this changing phenomenon according to social and legal conceptions.

This Special Issue has the purpose of contributing to international research on youth antisocial behavior, where researchers can share and disseminate the latest research advances from the double perspective of victims and offenders.

Prof. Dr. Juan García-García
Dr. Elena Ortega Campos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antisocial behavior
  • juvenile justice
  • recidivism
  • risk assessment instruments
  • victimization
  • youth offenders
  • youth victims

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
A Qualitative Study on Young Women’s Lives Prior to and Four Years after Youth Detention: Examining the Good Lives Model’s Aetiological Assumptions
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(22), 11830; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph182211830 - 11 Nov 2021
Viewed by 419
Abstract
Detained female adolescents constitute a vulnerable, challenging, and understudied minority. Interventions for DFA are still dominated by risk management approaches with less focus on strength-based approaches such as the Good Lives Model (GLM). This study explored the functionality of DFA’s behaviour prior to [...] Read more.
Detained female adolescents constitute a vulnerable, challenging, and understudied minority. Interventions for DFA are still dominated by risk management approaches with less focus on strength-based approaches such as the Good Lives Model (GLM). This study explored the functionality of DFA’s behaviour prior to and four years after release from detention, using the GLM as the guiding theoretical framework. A theory-driven thematic analysis was conducted of 30 in-depth interviews with former DFA (Mage = 20.80), exploring the fulfilment of their basic human needs (e.g., relatedness, independence) before and after detention. Before detention, the young women experienced multiple problems trying to fulfil multiple human needs, often contributing to poor balance in their lives and their antisocial behaviour. Although external and internal obstacles to fulfilling human needs were still present at follow-up, important improvements were noted, e.g., in the scope of their human needs and the resources available to fulfil their needs. The findings provide additional insights into the issues experienced by young women in detention and indicate there are opportunities to assist these young women, through the development of appropriate resources and capacities which provide them with appropriate means for fulfilling their needs and moving towards a personally meaningful and prosocial life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antisocial Behavior in Youth: Victims and Offenders)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Criminal Behavior and Psychosocial Risk Factors in Brazilian Adolescent Offenders: An Exploratory Latent Class Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(19), 10509; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph181910509 - 07 Oct 2021
Viewed by 601
Abstract
Considering that adolescent offenders are quite a heterogeneous group in terms of behavioral and psychosocial variables, it is considered that a typological approach can assist in the systematization of these differences, aiming at a better understanding of the phenomenon and at clearer guidance [...] Read more.
Considering that adolescent offenders are quite a heterogeneous group in terms of behavioral and psychosocial variables, it is considered that a typological approach can assist in the systematization of these differences, aiming at a better understanding of the phenomenon and at clearer guidance in terms of interventions. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the behavioral and psychosocial profiles of male adolescent offenders, based on empirical data collected in a Brazilian sociocultural context. The profiles were made with a sample of 400 adolescent offenders to perform an exploratory latent classes analysis. The instruments used in data collection were the Youth Behavior Questionnaire (Questionário de Comportamentos Juvenis, QCJ) and the Brazilian Jesness Inventory—Revised (Inventário Jesness-Revisado-Brasileiro, IJ-R-Br). The most appropriate model was that of four classes, with the profiles found indicating differences between the adolescent offenders both in relation to psychological functioning and criminal pattern, as well as the psychosocial risk/protective factors associated with each of the profiles. These findings, in addition to contributing to understanding the phenomenon, may help to reflect on the assessments required to assist in judicial decision-making processes and the customized proposal of psychosocial interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antisocial Behavior in Youth: Victims and Offenders)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Child-to-Parent Violence, Peer Victimization and Cybervictimization in Spanish Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9360; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18179360 - 04 Sep 2021
Viewed by 622
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyse the relationship between child-to-parent violence (CPV) (high, moderate and low), peer victimization (PV) (relational and overt, both physical and verbal) and cybervictimization (CV) (relational and overt), taking into account the role of sex. 1304 adolescents [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to analyse the relationship between child-to-parent violence (CPV) (high, moderate and low), peer victimization (PV) (relational and overt, both physical and verbal) and cybervictimization (CV) (relational and overt), taking into account the role of sex. 1304 adolescents (53.14% girls) between the ages of 11 and 18 enrolled at secondary schools in the Autonomous Communities of Valencia, Aragón and Andalusia participated in the study. Adolescents with high CPV scores obtained higher scores for all types of PV and CV compared to the other CPV groups. Boys scored higher than girls in overt physical PV and in overt CV and girls obtained higher scores in relational PV. A statistically significant interaction effect was observed; boys with high CPV scores reported greater overt CV. The results suggest the importance of CPV in relation to specific forms of PV and CV and highlight the need to take into account the different processes of family socialization between boys and girls to reduce the likelihood of adolescents being victimized. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antisocial Behavior in Youth: Victims and Offenders)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Factors Related to Gender Violence and Sex Education in Adolescents: A Cross-Sectional Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5836; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115836 - 29 May 2021
Viewed by 1117
Abstract
Background: For school medical services and the staff responsible for sex education for adolescents, it is important to understand the factors that may influence gender violence. The aim of this study is to determine whether the presence of sexist attitudes, double standards and/or [...] Read more.
Background: For school medical services and the staff responsible for sex education for adolescents, it is important to understand the factors that may influence gender violence. The aim of this study is to determine whether the presence of sexist attitudes, double standards and/or romantic myths contributes to the risk of gender violence. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out at five secondary schools in the province of Malaga (Spain). In total, 879 adolescents aged 12–18 years were included, studying years 1–4 of compulsory secondary education. Their attitudes were measured on the following scales: Ambivalent Sexism Inventory (ASI), Double Standard Scale (DSS) and Romantic Love Myths Scale (EMA). Results: Significant differences were observed among the age/year groups for the mean scores obtained on each of the above scales (DSS, p < 0.01; EMA, p < 0.01; ASI, p < 0.01). By gender, the boys recorded higher scores for ASI and lower ones for DSS (p < 0.01). The Spearman’s rho value revealed significant relationships between the presence of sexual double standards and that of romantic myths and ambivalent attitudes (p < 0.01). Conclusions: Adolescents commonly express romantic love myths, sexist attitudes and sexual double standards. These three factors, which are significantly correlated, influence the presence of violence in dating relationships. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antisocial Behavior in Youth: Victims and Offenders)
Article
Parental Behavioral Control and Bullying and Victimization of Rural Adolescents in China: The Roles of Deviant Peer Affiliation and Gender
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4816; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18094816 - 30 Apr 2021
Viewed by 828
Abstract
Bullying and victimization (BAV) have been widely studied, but the potential mechanism of parental behavioral control (PBC) on bullying and victimization in Chinese adolescents has not been explored. This study aimed to examine a moderated mediation model for the association between PBC and [...] Read more.
Bullying and victimization (BAV) have been widely studied, but the potential mechanism of parental behavioral control (PBC) on bullying and victimization in Chinese adolescents has not been explored. This study aimed to examine a moderated mediation model for the association between PBC and BAV mediated by deviant peer affiliation (DPA) and moderated by gender. A total of 3779 adolescents (Nboy = 1679, Mage = 14.98 years, SD = 0.95) from southwest China has completed the Peer Bullying, Peer Victimization, PBC, and DPA questionnaires. The results indicated that: (1) PBC significantly predicted adolescents’ BAV (−12%); (2) DPA mediated the effect of PBC on BAV only for those adolescents who were both bullies and victims; (3) the mediating role of DPA was moderated by gender only in the relationship between PBC and victimization, with a relatively stronger effect in girls than in boys. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antisocial Behavior in Youth: Victims and Offenders)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop