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Special Issue "Asbestos Exposure and Disease: An Update"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Corrado Magnani
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Medicina Traslazionale, SCDU Epidemiologia del Tumori, Universita del Piemonte Orientale, 28100 Novara, Italy
Interests: cancer epidemiology; occupational cancer; environmental cancer; asbestos; mesothelioma; lung cancer epidemiology
Dr. Alison Reid
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Public Health, Curtin University, 6102 Perth, Australia
Interests: occupational health and safety of migrant workers; the health effects of low dose asbestos exposure
Dr. Eduardo Algranti
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Fundação Jorge Duprat Figueiredo de Segurança e Medicina do Trabalho FUNDACENTRO, Ministry of Labour, São Paulo, Brasil
Interests: occupational respiratory diseases; asbestos-related diseases; silica-related diseases; work-related asthma
Dr. Daniela Ferrante
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Medicina Traslazionale, Università del Piemonte Orientale, Via Solaroli 17, Novara, Italy
Interests: biostatistics; asbestos-related diseases; cohort studies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Adverse health effects caused by asbestos exposure are an important global health issue. In industrialized countries, asbestos exposure is minimized by effective protection policies, of the foremost being the ban on the manufacture and use of asbestos products. In contrast, in emerging economy countries asbestos is still largely mined and used. Occupational exposure, traditionally the most important source of exposure, is also accompanied by domestic and environmental exposure. The latter is produced by environmental pollution from asbestos industry, but it is also the legacy left by asbestos in place, until it is safely removed. In the countries where anti-asbestos policies have been effectively applied, malignant mesothelioma has become the neoplasm of greatest relevance, with rates that are still increasing or showing a plateau, depending on the time from the ban. Little is known about epidemiology of asbestosis and lung cancer, as well as of mesothelioma, in the countries where the use of control measures is more limited. Amphiboles (crocidolite and amosite) were the most dangerous asbestos types to the pleura and now they have been entirely replaced by chrysotile in the current products. Epidemiological studies on the cohorts of chrysotile workers are surprisingly few, despite the large number of people exposed and more evidence would be useful to describe the risks associated to chrysotile exposure in current conditions. In recent years, studies also underlined the health risks from asbestos—like minerals, such as erionite and fluoro-edenite. These minerals do not have industrial uses and the information on the occurrence is limited, however they are responsible for important local outbreaks of mesothelioma and little is known regarding other possible health effects. This Special Issue will welcome contributions on asbestos-related diseases, fibers characterization, exposure assessment, risk modification with cumulative exposure, latency, and time since cessation, both for the specific asbestos types and for the asbestos-like minerals. Papers describing successful anti-asbestos policies, are welcome.

Prof. Corrado Magnani
Dr. Alison Reid
Dr. Eduardo Algranti
Dr. Daniela Ferrante
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Asbestos
  • Chrysotile
  • Mixed fibers
  • Asbestos-like minerals
  • Asbestos-related diseases
  • Mesothelioma
  • Asbestos and lung cancer
  • Asbestos and ovarian cancer
  • Asbestosis
  • New asbestos related diseases
  • Fibers characterization
  • Exposure assessment
  • Socioeconomic aspects of asbestos exposure

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Using a Mobile Phone App to Identify and Assess Remaining Stocks of In Situ Asbestos in Australian Residential Settings
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(24), 4922; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16244922 - 05 Dec 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1106
Abstract
Asbestos-containing materials (ACMs) were used extensively throughout much of the 20th century and can still be found in many Australian homes. Therefore, we developed a mobile application (“app”), called ACM Check, which guides users through a home inspection to identify and assess certain [...] Read more.
Asbestos-containing materials (ACMs) were used extensively throughout much of the 20th century and can still be found in many Australian homes. Therefore, we developed a mobile application (“app”), called ACM Check, which guides users through a home inspection to identify and assess certain types of in situ ACM. A cross-sectional study was conducted using the app to collect data on the type and condition of in situ asbestos in Australian residential settings. Since being released in June 2017, we have received data for 702 home inspections. Of these, 578 (82.3%) houses contained a total of 1895 in situ materials categorised as positive for asbestos by the app. The most prevalent ACMs were used for the backing board to electrical meter boxes (50% of homes), eaves and soffit linings (44.2% of homes), and fencing (28.1% of homes). While the majority of ACMs were categorised as ‘very low’ or ‘low’ priority for removal or remediation, 6.6% of all ACMs were considered to be of ‘high’ priority. Mobile apps offer a platform to help increase people’s awareness of possible health hazards found in the residential environment, such as asbestos, while also being used to collect data for public and environmental health research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Asbestos Exposure and Disease: An Update)
Article
Environmental and Occupational Exposure to Asbestos as a Result of Consumption and Use in Poland
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(14), 2611; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16142611 - 22 Jul 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1570
Abstract
Asbestos is harmful to human health; exposure to asbestos causes a wide range of asbestos-related diseases. Aim: Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is unique to occupational and environmental asbestos exposure. Methods: Environmental asbestos exposure was examined in relation to asbestos use and manufacturing, the quantity [...] Read more.
Asbestos is harmful to human health; exposure to asbestos causes a wide range of asbestos-related diseases. Aim: Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is unique to occupational and environmental asbestos exposure. Methods: Environmental asbestos exposure was examined in relation to asbestos use and manufacturing, the quantity of the asbestos-containing products still in use, the concentrations of asbestos fibres in the air and the number of MM cases diagnosed each year per county. Results: The correlation coefficient of the measurements of the asbestos fibre concentrations in the air and the quantity of asbestos-cement products in use is high and amounts to 0.68. Meanwhile, the correlation coefficient of the measurements of asbestos fibre concentrations in air and MM morbidity rate resulting from environmental exposure calculated for particular counties in provinces is low and amounts to 0.37. The highest MM morbidity rate was observed for Małopolskie and Śląskie, a typical industrial area of Poland. Conclusions: There are MM cases which are still attributable to occupational asbestos exposure, although MM cases resulting from environmental exposure to asbestos have an increased MM risk. Poland is among those countries with a low MM incidence rate, which seems to be an underestimation of environmental asbestos exposure. As long as asbestos-cement products are used in the environment, actions should be undertaken to protect public health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Asbestos Exposure and Disease: An Update)
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Article
Lung Cancer Mortality Trends in a Brazilian City with a Long History of Asbestos Consumption
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(14), 2548; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16142548 - 17 Jul 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1327
Abstract
There are scarce epidemiological studies on lung cancer mortality in areas exposed to asbestos in developing countries. We compared the rates and trends in mortality from lung cancer between 1980 and 2016 in a municipality that made extensive use of asbestos, Osasco, with [...] Read more.
There are scarce epidemiological studies on lung cancer mortality in areas exposed to asbestos in developing countries. We compared the rates and trends in mortality from lung cancer between 1980 and 2016 in a municipality that made extensive use of asbestos, Osasco, with rates from a referent municipality with lower asbestos exposure and with the rates for the State of São Paulo. We retrieved death records for cases of lung cancer (ICD-9 C162) (ICD-10 C33 C34) from 1980 to 2016 in adults aged 60 years and older. The join point regression and age-period-cohort models were fitted to the data. Among men, there was an increasing trend in lung cancer mortality in Osasco of 0.7% (CI: 0.1; 1.3) in contrast to a mean annual decrease for Sorocaba of -1.5% (CI: −2.4; −0.6) and a stable average trend for São Paulo of -0.1 (IC: −0.3; 0.1). Similar increasing trends were seen in women. The age-period-cohort model showed an increase in the risk of death from 1996 in Osasco and a reduction for Sorocaba and São Paulo State during the same period. Our results point to a need for a special monitoring regarding lung cancer incidence and mortality in areas with higher asbestos exposure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Asbestos Exposure and Disease: An Update)
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Comment
Comment on Małgorzata Krówczyńska and Ewa Wilk. Environmental and Occupational Exposure to Asbestos as a Result of Consumption and Use in Poland. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2611
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(5), 1662; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17051662 - 04 Mar 2020
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Abstract
Krówczyńska M [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Asbestos Exposure and Disease: An Update)
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