Special Issue "Caffeine, Human Performance and Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Juan Del Coso
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Sport Sciences (ICD), Rey Juan Carlos University, 28943 Fuenlabrada, Spain
Interests: exercise performance; sports nutrition; exercise physiology; anti-doping; genetics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Caffeine has been consumed for thousands of years in different cultures, even though it is a substance which has no nutritional value and is not essential for any basic physiological function. It is highly likely that the first brews prepared with leaves or seeds containing caffeine were used for rituals and ceremonies, but the current use of caffeine is more associated to the physical and mental enhancement obtained with the consumption of different beverages such as coffee, tea, and maté. Today, caffeine has become the most widely used psychoactive substance in the world, and there is a need to completely understand the benefits and drawbacks of this substance when used acutely and chronically, and the difference in the use of natural vs. artificial sources of caffeine. For example, in recent years, research investigating the benefits of acute caffeine intake has rocketed, and we now know that doses from 3 to 6 mg of caffeine per kg of body mass are ergogenic in several exercise and sport contexts. However, we need more evidence to determine the best source to provide caffeine (gum, pills, pre-workout) depending on the characteristics of exercise. Additionally, we need to establish the course of tolerance to the ergogenic effect of caffeine when this substance is consumed chronically. Lastly, it is necessary to determine whether caffeine has any impact in complex sports based on skills and where reaction time is key to success. All this information is key when it comes to amateur and elite use of caffeine-containing supplements before training and competition. On the other hand, the chronic use of caffeine through natural sources has been deemed valuable toward improving cardiovascular health, and protecting against dementia. However, we need more information about what the best source and dosing is to obtain these benefits without creating dependency to this stimulant. Additionally, we need to better understand the factors that explain the different interpersonal reactions to caffeine beverages, the most recommended manner to consume caffeine in terms of digestion and absorption, and how other biologically active compounds present in tea and coffee interact with caffeine to produce further benefits. We also need to know if there are any adverse effects in those individuals ingesting high doses of caffeine for years, as it may be possible that the benefits of caffeine are associated with moderate doses to avoid dependence.

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide data about the benefits of using caffeine or caffeine-containing products on different forms of human performance (with a particular focus on sports performance) and on human health. For this Special Issue, we invite the submission of original research on the abovementioned topics, although we will also assess the inclusion of high-quality systematic reviews and meta-analyses measuring the effects of caffeine on human performance and health.

Dr. Juan Del Coso
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Exercise
  • Sport
  • Ergogenic aid
  • Diet
  • Beverage
  • Antioxidants
  • Cancer risk

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Market Expansion of Caffeine-Containing Products: Italian and Argentinian Yerba Mate Consumer Behavior and Health Perception
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 8117; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18158117 - 31 Jul 2021
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Abstract
Mate is the most consumed beverage in South America. There is interest in expanding yerba mate sales into the old and new markets by promoting its health properties and energizing effects. The research study aims to explore Argentinian and Italian purchasing and consumption [...] Read more.
Mate is the most consumed beverage in South America. There is interest in expanding yerba mate sales into the old and new markets by promoting its health properties and energizing effects. The research study aims to explore Argentinian and Italian purchasing and consumption behavior and perception of yerba mate. The exploration includes agro-food chain stakeholders’ views, and consumers’ habits, perception, knowledge of yerba mate in relation to other market positioning caffeine-containing products. Data collection includes qualitative method, such as interviews with agro-food chain stakeholders, that is producers, processors, consumers, and quantitative consumer survey. Data collection was carried out in Argentina and in Italy. Results show that in Argentina yerba mate consumption is driven by habit and tradition, and in Italy yerba mate is mostly unknown. Consumers tend to drink yerba mate in Argentina and other caffeine-containing beverages in Italy to socialize, and as source of energy. Consumers have little awareness of yerba mate antioxidant properties. Yerba mate provides the energy of coffee drinking, and the taste and pleasure of tea drinking. Italian consumers’ key challenge to yerba mate drinking is the longer time it takes, compared to the usual espresso. Italians perceive it as an energetic or relaxing beverage, with a consumption experience similar to tea and infusions. There is need to update commercialization strategy of yerba mate in Italy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Caffeine, Human Performance and Health)

Review

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Review
Ergogenic Effects of Acute Caffeine Intake on Muscular Endurance and Muscular Strength in Women: A Meta-Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5773; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115773 - 27 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1682
Abstract
This meta-analysis aimed to explore the effects of caffeine ingestion on muscular endurance and muscular strength in women. Five databases were searched to find relevant studies. A random-effects meta-analysis of standardized mean differences (SMD) was performed for data analysis. Subgroup meta-analyses explored the [...] Read more.
This meta-analysis aimed to explore the effects of caffeine ingestion on muscular endurance and muscular strength in women. Five databases were searched to find relevant studies. A random-effects meta-analysis of standardized mean differences (SMD) was performed for data analysis. Subgroup meta-analyses explored the effects of caffeine on upper-body and lower-body muscular endurance and muscular strength. Eight crossover placebo-controlled studies were included in the review. In the main meta-analysis that considered data from all included studies, there was a significant ergogenic effect of caffeine on muscular endurance (SMD = 0.25; p = 0.027) and muscular strength (SMD = 0.18; p < 0.001). In a subgroup analysis that considered only upper-body exercises, there was a significant ergogenic effect of caffeine on muscular endurance (SMD = 0.20; p = 0.007) and muscular strength (SMD = 0.17; p < 0.001). In a subgroup analysis that considered only lower-body exercises, there was no significant difference between caffeine and placebo for muscular endurance (SMD = 0.43; p = 0.092) or muscular strength (SMD = 0.16; p = 0.109). The main finding of this meta-analysis is that caffeine ingestion has a significant ergogenic effect on muscular endurance and muscular strength in women. The effects reported in this analysis are similar to those previously observed in men and suggest that women may use caffeine supplementation as an ergogenic aid for muscular performance. Future research is needed to explore the effects of caffeine on lower-body muscular endurance and muscular strength in this population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Caffeine, Human Performance and Health)
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