Special Issue "Data and Methods for Monitoring and Decisions in Public Health"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Nicola Bartolomeo
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, School of Medicine and Surgery, University of Bari Aldo Moro, 70121 Bari, Italy
Interests: biomedical science; biostatistics; Markov model; spatial analysis
Prof. Margherita Fanelli
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Interdisciplinary Medicine, School of Medicine and Surgery, University of Bari Aldo Moro, 70121 Bari, Italy
Interests: clinical research; epidemiology; diagnostic and prognostic study; breast cancer epidemiology; probiotic administration and infant nutrition
Prof. Dr. Paolo Trerotoli
E-Mail Website
Chief Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, School of Medicine and Surgery, University of Bari Aldo Moro, 70121 Bari, Italy
Interests: biomedical sciences; human oncology; biostatistics; quality of health systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce the Special Issue “Data and Methods for Monitoring and Decision in Public Health”. The aim of this issue is to collect research papers on methods to analyze and connect databases (registers, administrative databases, open data from institutions, etc.). Papers showing results of research based on surveillance data are also welcome.

We think that public health decisions should be based on strong evidence coming both from traditional experimental trials and real-world evidence, applying new technology of data analysis.

The main topics of the papers can be:

  • Statistical methods to analyze real world data, validation of quality indicators, evaluation of outcome indicators for prevention (screening, care setting, patients pathways, etc.), evaluation of value in health assistance;
  • Surveillance in public health with innovative methods;
  • Studies of health outcome applying prevention strategies;
  • Observational studies in areas with environmental risk;
  • Studies on diagnostic accuracy and screening.

Prof. Paolo Trerotoli
Prof. Nicola Bartolomeo
Prof. Margherita Fanelli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Real world data
  • Machine learning in public health
  • Outcome indicators
  • Quality indicators
  • Screening
  • Diagnostic accuracy
  • Prevention
  • Bayesian analysis
  • Spatial analysis
  • Environment and health
  • Vaccine effectiveness

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
In-Hospital Mortality in Non-COVID-19-Related Diseases before and during the Pandemic: A Regional Retrospective Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(20), 10886; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph182010886 - 16 Oct 2021
Viewed by 308
Abstract
Italy was one of the nations most affected by SARS-CoV-2. During the pandemic period, the national government approved some restrictions to reduce diffusion of the virus. We aimed to evaluate changes in in-hospital mortality and its possible relation with patient comorbidities and different [...] Read more.
Italy was one of the nations most affected by SARS-CoV-2. During the pandemic period, the national government approved some restrictions to reduce diffusion of the virus. We aimed to evaluate changes in in-hospital mortality and its possible relation with patient comorbidities and different restrictive public health measures adopted during the 2020 pandemic period. We analyzed the hospital discharge records of inpatients from public and private hospitals in Apulia (Southern Italy) from 1 January 2019 to 31 December 2020. The study period was divided into four phases according to administrative restriction. The possible association between in-hospital deaths, hospitalization period, and covariates such as age group, sex, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) class, and length of hospitalization stay (LoS) class was evaluated using a multivariable logistic regression model. The risk of death was slightly higher in men than in women (OR 1.04, 95% CI: 1.01–1.07) and was lower for every age group below the >75 years age group. The risk of in-hospital death was lower for hospitalizations with a lower CCI score. In summary, our analysis shows a possible association between in-hospital mortality in non-COVID-19-related diseases and restrictive measures of public health. The risk of hospital death increased during the lockdown period. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Data and Methods for Monitoring and Decisions in Public Health)
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Article
Characteristics and Trends of the Hospital Standardized Readmission Ratios for Pneumonia: A Retrospective Observational Study Using Japanese Administrative Claims Data from 2010 to 2018
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7624; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147624 - 17 Jul 2021
Viewed by 678
Abstract
Previous studies indicated that optimal care for pneumonia during hospitalization might reduce the risk of in-hospital mortality and subsequent readmission. This study was a retrospective observational study using Japanese administrative claims data from April 2010 to March 2019. We analyzed data from 167,120 [...] Read more.
Previous studies indicated that optimal care for pneumonia during hospitalization might reduce the risk of in-hospital mortality and subsequent readmission. This study was a retrospective observational study using Japanese administrative claims data from April 2010 to March 2019. We analyzed data from 167,120 inpatients with pneumonia ≥15 years old in the benchmarking project managed by All Japan Hospital Association. Hospital-level risk-adjusted ratios of 30-day readmission for pneumonia were calculated using multivariable logistic regression analyses. The Spearman’s correlation coefficient was used to assess the correlation in each consecutive period. In the analysis using complete 9-year data including 54,756 inpatients, the hospital standardized readmission ratios (HSRRs) showed wide variation among hospitals and improvement trend (r = −0.18, p = 0.03). In the analyses of trends in each consecutive period, the HSRRS were positively correlated between ‘2010–2012’ and ‘2013–2015’ (r = 0.255, p = 0.010), and ‘2013–2015’ and ‘2016–2018’ (r = 0.603, p < 0.001). This study denoted the HSRRs for pneumonia could be calculated using Japanese administrative claims data. The HSRRs significantly varied among hospitals with comparable case-mix, and could relatively evaluate the quality of preventing readmission including long-term trends. The HSRRs can be used as yet another measure to help improve quality of care over time if other indicators are examined in parallel. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Data and Methods for Monitoring and Decisions in Public Health)
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Article
Effectiveness of an Innovative Sensory Approach to Improve Children’s Nutritional Choices
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6462; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18126462 - 15 Jun 2021
Viewed by 542
Abstract
A case-control study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of the Edueat® Method, through experiential workshops focused on the use of all 5 senses. In two different primary schools in the same city, questionnaires were administered in two months with a follow-up [...] Read more.
A case-control study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of the Edueat® Method, through experiential workshops focused on the use of all 5 senses. In two different primary schools in the same city, questionnaires were administered in two months with a follow-up one year later. Participants: 119 children (age 8.2–9.0) chosen randomly; control group 66 (55.5%). Seven lessons of 2 h each were held in the schools by experts of the Edueat® method and seven extra lessons by the teachers. The main outcome measures were the children’s changes in their approach and attitude towards their eating habits. The answers were grouped with factor analysis and summarized through scores. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was conducted in order to identify the relationships between scores and treatment over time. At the end of treatment, the intervention group showed a significant appreciation towards healthy foods (+4.15 vs. −0.05, p = 0.02) and a greater capacity in identifying foods which are very good for the health (+15.6 vs. +14.4, p = 0.02). In conclusion, the Edueat® method was found to be particularly promising in transmitting knowledge of those foods which are healthy. Greater involvement of teachers and parents is crucial. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Data and Methods for Monitoring and Decisions in Public Health)
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Article
Response Activity in Mixed-Method Survey Data Collection—The Methods Used in a Survey among the Foreign-Born Population in Finland (FinMonik)
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 3300; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18063300 - 23 Mar 2021
Viewed by 902
Abstract
In terms of the number of respondents, Survey on Well-Being among Foreign Born Population (FinMonik) is so far the most extensive survey carried out among the population with foreign background in Finland. It comprises a wide range of self-reported data, including information on [...] Read more.
In terms of the number of respondents, Survey on Well-Being among Foreign Born Population (FinMonik) is so far the most extensive survey carried out among the population with foreign background in Finland. It comprises a wide range of self-reported data, including information on the respondent’s health, well-being and access to care, which can be widely utilized in planning and assessing integration, health and welfare policies. A mixed-method approach (an electronic questionnaire, a paper questionnaire and phone interviews) was used in collecting the data which consists of responses by 6836 respondents aged 18–64 years. All response types included, the response rate was 53.1% (n = 6836). This study describes in detail the methods used in the FinMonik survey. In addition, we describe the demographics of the respondents partaking in each response format. The aim of the study is to promote the development of mixed-method survey as a way of collecting reliable data that can be used to enhance foreign-born people’s health, well-being and access to health care. The survey responses will be used as a baseline in observing the respondents’ well-being through the register-based data available in several national registers on health, medicine use and access to care as well as the data collected in the study Impact of Coronavirus Epidemic on Well-Being among Foreign Born Population Study (MigCOVID). Furthermore, the FinMonik study protocol will be repeated every four years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Data and Methods for Monitoring and Decisions in Public Health)
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Article
In the Subtropical Monsoon Climate High-Density City, What Features of the Neighborhood Environment Matter Most for Public Health?
by , , , and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9566; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17249566 - 21 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 826
Abstract
Urbanization and climate change have been rapidly occurring globally. Evidence-based healthy city development is required to improve living quality and mitigate the adverse impact of the outdoor neighborhood environment on public health. Taking Guangzhou as an example to explore the association of neighborhood [...] Read more.
Urbanization and climate change have been rapidly occurring globally. Evidence-based healthy city development is required to improve living quality and mitigate the adverse impact of the outdoor neighborhood environment on public health. Taking Guangzhou as an example to explore the association of neighborhood environment and public health and preferably to offer some implications for better future city development, we measured ten environmental factors (temperature (T), wind-chill index (WCI), thermal stress index (HSI), relative humidity (RH), average wind speed (AWS), negative oxygen ions (NOI), PM2.5, luminous flux (LF), and illuminance (I)) in four seasons in four typical neighborhoods, and the SF-36 health scale was employed to assess the physical and mental health of neighborhood residents in nine subscales (health transition(HT), physiological functions (PF), general health status (GH), physical pain (BP), physiological functions (RP), energy vitality (VT), mental health (MH), social function (SF), and emotional functions (RE)). The linear mixed model was used in an analysis of variance. We ranked the different environmental factors in relation to aspects of health and weighted them accordingly. Generally, the thermal environment had the greatest impact on both physical and mental health and the atmospheric environment and wind environment had the least impact on physical health and mental health, respectively. In addition, the physical health of the resident was more greatly affected by the environment than mental health. According to the results, we make a number of strategic suggestions for the renewal of the outdoor neighborhood environment in subtropical monsoon climate high-density cities and provide a theoretical basis for improving public health through landscape architecture at the neighborhood scale. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Data and Methods for Monitoring and Decisions in Public Health)
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