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Special Issue "Economic Evaluation of Public Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Economics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Ceri J. Phillips
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Human and Health Sciences, Swansea University, Wales SA2 8PP, UK
Interests: economic evaluation; cost-effectiveness; public health; chronic conditions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Chronic diseases are defined by the World Health Organization as requiring “ongoing management over a period of years or decades” (WHO, 2002). The increasing burden of these conditions is one of the greatest challenges confronting health systems globally, representing a major cause of premature mortality and having a significant impact on life expectancy and healthy life expectancy. They have a deleterious effect on the quality of life and are leading drivers of healthcare costs, accounting for significant proportions of healthcare expenditure. In the US, 60% of adults have one chronic condition, with 40% having more than one (CDC, 2020). Many chronic conditions have their origin in risky behavior, such as tobacco use, poor nutrition, lack of physical activity, and excessive alcohol use. The effective management of chronic conditions requires the development of complex systems that span a host of multidisciplinary perspectives and organizational settings, plus having to confront the entrenched cognitive and financial barriers that hinder co-operation and collaboration (Suhrcke, Fahey, and McKee (2008)). The prevention of chronic conditions therefore has major health and economic benefits but challenging logistical obstacles to overcome.

Papers addressing evaluations of public health interventions are therefore invited for this Special Issue, especially those combining a high academic standard coupled with a focus on methodological and contextual challenges encountered.

References

Prof. Dr. Ceri Phillips
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • economic evaluation
  • cost-effectiveness
  • public health
  • chronic conditions

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Article
Identification of Factors for the Development of Medical Tourism in the World
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(21), 11205; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph182111205 - 25 Oct 2021
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Abstract
The overall objective of the given paper was to study the relationship of inbound medical tourism destinations with international tourism, economic development of recipient countries, the development of national healthcare systems and the institutional features of their environment, in terms of protection of [...] Read more.
The overall objective of the given paper was to study the relationship of inbound medical tourism destinations with international tourism, economic development of recipient countries, the development of national healthcare systems and the institutional features of their environment, in terms of protection of the rights and freedoms of both business and citizens. In order to achieve this objective, the authors used methods of grouping, as well as correlation and regression analysis. The conducted study revealed that the formation of medical tourism destinations in countries with high social and economic development occurs in a balanced and unidirectional manner; simultaneously, one can see that the countries with “new economic development” form a sufficiently powerful and competitive market for medical tourism. All these countries have one thing in common: namely, there is a link between medical tourism and healthcare funding, international tourism and development of political and civil freedoms. Nevertheless, the noted aspects are not dominant enough, and this indicates that there are other internal factors and their configurations which shape a positive image of countries for medical tourism development. This finding leads to the necessity of further analysis in this field with a breakdown into separate countries or destinations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Evaluation of Public Health)
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Article
Does Self-Assessed Health Reflect the True Health State?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(21), 11153; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph182111153 - 23 Oct 2021
Viewed by 676
Abstract
Self-assessed health (SAH) is a widely used tool to estimate population health. However, the debate continues as to what exactly this ubiquitous measure of social science research means for policy conclusions. This study is aimed at understanding the tenability of the construct of [...] Read more.
Self-assessed health (SAH) is a widely used tool to estimate population health. However, the debate continues as to what exactly this ubiquitous measure of social science research means for policy conclusions. This study is aimed at understanding the tenability of the construct of SAH by simultaneously modelling SAH and clinical morbidity. Using data from 17 waves (2001–2017) of the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey, which captures repeated response for SAH and frequently updates information on clinical morbidity, we operationalise a recursive semi-ordered probit model. Our approach allows for the estimation of the distributional effect of clinical morbidity on perceived health. This study establishes the superiority of inferences from the recursive model. We illustrated the model use for examining the endogeneity problem of perceived health for SAH, contributing to population health research and public policy development, in particular, towards the organisation of health systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Evaluation of Public Health)
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Brief Report
The Impact of COVID-19 on Canada’s Food Literacy: Results of a Cross-National Survey
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(10), 5485; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18105485 - 20 May 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1134
Abstract
Several studies of food literacy emphasise the acquisition of critical knowledge over context. This evaluation looks at how COVID-19 impacted food literacy in a country affected by the global pandemic. To our knowledge, there has been no systematic research that would allow a [...] Read more.
Several studies of food literacy emphasise the acquisition of critical knowledge over context. This evaluation looks at how COVID-19 impacted food literacy in a country affected by the global pandemic. To our knowledge, there has been no systematic research that would allow a better understanding of the impact of uncertainty or enhanced perceived risks generated by a global crisis on the prevalence of household food literacy. This study looks at food literacy from a perceptive of how an event that has domesticated many of them can alter knowledge and the relationship people have with food. A cross-national survey including 10,004 Canadians was conducted ten months after the start of the pandemic. Results show that Canadians have learned new recipes. Canadians have also taken up gardening and have relied on several sources to gather information. This study provides some evidence that Canadians have become more food literate because of the COVID-19 pandemic, but less significantly than anticipated. Practical and policy implications are presented as well as some future research directions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Evaluation of Public Health)
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