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Special Issue "Emotional and Behavioural Adjustment in Adolescence"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Estefanía Estévez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departament of Health Psychology, University of Miguel Hernández, Avda. de la Universidad s/n, Edificio Altamira, 03202 Alicante, Spain
Interests: peer aggression; peer victimization; school violence, bullying, cyberbullying; school climate; school adjustment; psychosocial adjustment; emotional adjustment; emotional regulation; emotional intelligence; life satifaction
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Gonzalo Musitu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Education and Social Psychology Department, University Pablo de Olavide, Seville 04103, Spain
Prof. Dr. José A. Piqueras
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This monograph seeks to deepen exploration of psychosocial adjustment in adolescence, a topic of great scientific relevance, and, more specifically, of adjustment in emotional and behavioural areas. Adjustment and well-being in this evolutionary stage are related to the many changes and challenges to which the person must adapt, both in terms of physical appearance, as well as in family relationships, or interactions with peers and teachers in a school context. This monograph, therefore, aims to provide ideas for psychologists and other professionals that, at the same time, will allow them to respond to the demands of parents and social and educational institutions regarding what it means to be an adolescent and how to understand their behaviours and feelings in order to respond appropriately and functionally.

Thus, this Special Issue seeks papers on specific issues in adolescence such as bullying, cyberbullying, teacher–student relationships, socio-emotional competencies, such as emotional intelligence, mental health in adolescence, delinquency, and substance use, psychological needs, motivation and autonomy, or the quality of family relationships. Empirical studies and high-quality systematic reviews will be considered.

Prof. Estefanía Estévez
Prof. Gonzalo Musitu
Prof. José A. Piqueras
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Emotional adjustment
  • Psychosocial adjustment
  • Emotional intelligence
  • Behavioral adjustment
  • School violence
  • Family violence
  • Bullying
  • Cyberbullying
  • Mental health
  • Social emotional competences

Published Papers (20 papers)

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Article
Strengths Against Psychopathology in Adolescents: Ratifying the Robust Buffer Role of Trait Emotional Intelligence
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(3), 804; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17030804 - 28 Jan 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1433
Abstract
The aim of this study was to unravel the interrelated effects of trait emotional intelligence (Trait EI), mindfulness, and irrational beliefs on adolescent mental health. A random sample of students from three secondary schools in Spain and eight secondary schools in Portugal was [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to unravel the interrelated effects of trait emotional intelligence (Trait EI), mindfulness, and irrational beliefs on adolescent mental health. A random sample of students from three secondary schools in Spain and eight secondary schools in Portugal was recruited. We conducted four-step hierarchical regression analyses. We also conducted regression analyses to examine the role of mindfulness skills and catastrophizing as mediators of the link between emotional intelligence and psychosocial problems. Finally, the SPSS PROCESS computing tool was used to perform conditional process analysis (model 6). A total of 1370 adolescents from Spain (n = 591) and Portugal (n = 779) participated in this study (mean age = 14.97, SD = 1.50; range = 12–18). The mediation analyses confirmed that adolescent mental health was determined by Trait EI directly, and by mindfulness skills and catastrophizing thoughts in an indirect way. Together, the four variables explained 44% of psychopathology, with EI being the most powerful predictor, which ratify the robust buffer role and incremental validity of Trait EI against youth mental health. The identified pathways provide keys for emotional education interventions aimed at promoting adolescent mental health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional and Behavioural Adjustment in Adolescence)
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Article
Promoting Social and Emotional Learning and Subjective Well-Being: Impact of the “Aislados” Intervention Program in Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 609; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17020609 - 17 Jan 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1779
Abstract
The aim of this study is to experimentally assess the effects of an intervention program through a video game called “Aislados” for the improvement of subjective well-being, mental health and trait emotional intelligence of a sample of adolescents (n = 187). We [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to experimentally assess the effects of an intervention program through a video game called “Aislados” for the improvement of subjective well-being, mental health and trait emotional intelligence of a sample of adolescents (n = 187). We used well-established measures with appropriate psychometric properties. The study used a quasi-experimental design of pre-test/post-test repeated measurements with a control group. First, a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and then descriptive analyses and variance analyses (ANOVAs) were carried out by the adolescents randomly assigned to the experimental and control conditions. Then, a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was performed on the study’s variables as a whole. Descriptive and covariance analyses of the post-test scores were carried out (ANCOVAs post-test, co-varying pre-test scores), in order to demonstrate the impact of the program. The effect size was reckoned (Cohen’s d). The results confirm statistically-significant differences in: Health-Related Quality of life, positive affect and mental health. The study provides an effective intervention tool which has been experimentally validated. The overall results allow for emphasizing the importance of the implementation of programs aimed at encouraging social and emotional learning throughout adolescence as protective resources in fostering emotional and behavioral adjustment in adolescents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional and Behavioural Adjustment in Adolescence)
Article
Loneliness, Family Communication, and School Adjustment in a Sample of Cybervictimized Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 335; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17010335 - 03 Jan 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1587
Abstract
The objective of this study was to compare individual, family, and social variables, such as the perception of loneliness, family communication, and school adjustment in a sample of 2399 Andalusian (Spanish) adolescents aged 12 to 18 (M = 14.63, SD = 1.91) [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to compare individual, family, and social variables, such as the perception of loneliness, family communication, and school adjustment in a sample of 2399 Andalusian (Spanish) adolescents aged 12 to 18 (M = 14.63, SD = 1.91) suffering from cybervictimization (low, moderate, and high). The results show that adolescents suffering from high cybervictimization report more loneliness, more problematic communication with both parents, and worse school adjustment than the rest of the groups. Regarding gender, differences are observed in open communication with the mother and in the dimensions of school adjustment, being more favorable for girls. However, there were no significant differences between girls and boys in the loneliness variable. The interaction effects indicate, on the one hand, that female severe cybervictims present more avoidant communication with the mother than the other groups, and, on the other hand, that male cybervictims of all three groups and female severe cybervictims have lower academic competence than the group of female low cybervictims, followed by female moderate cybervictims. These data support the idea that, depending on its intensity and duration, cybervictimization affects girls and boys differently in terms of individual, family, and social variables. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional and Behavioural Adjustment in Adolescence)
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Article
Teaching Styles in Physical Education: A New Approach to Predicting Resilience and Bullying
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 76; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17010076 - 20 Dec 2019
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3069
Abstract
The main objective of this study was to analyze student-perceived teaching styles’ power to predict students’ resilience and the emergence of bullying behaviors in physical education class. A total of 537 students of both sexes, between 11 and 15 years of age, from [...] Read more.
The main objective of this study was to analyze student-perceived teaching styles’ power to predict students’ resilience and the emergence of bullying behaviors in physical education class. A total of 537 students of both sexes, between 11 and 15 years of age, from primary and secondary schools in the province of Alicante (Spain), participated in the study. The design of the study was cross-sectional. The results showed that bullying was positively predicted by students’ perceptions of a more controlling style and negatively by a greater perception of an autonomy-supportive style in physical education classes. Victimization was negatively predicted by greater resilience and positively by students’ perception of a teacher’s more controlling style. Finally, the mediation analysis showed that the perception of autonomy support indirectly and negatively predicted victimization, with resilience acting as a mediator. These findings provide useful information for physical education teachers interested in preventing bullying, and have important practical implications about the teaching style recommended for this purpose. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional and Behavioural Adjustment in Adolescence)
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Article
Development and Validation of the EspaiJove.net Mental Health Literacy (EMHL) Test for Spanish Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 72; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17010072 - 20 Dec 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1045
Abstract
There is evidence of the effectiveness of implementing mental health literacy (MHL) programs. However, there are substantial limitations in the instruments available for measuring MHL. This study aimed to develop and validate the EspaiJove.net MHL test (EMHL) for Spanish adolescents by assessing its [...] Read more.
There is evidence of the effectiveness of implementing mental health literacy (MHL) programs. However, there are substantial limitations in the instruments available for measuring MHL. This study aimed to develop and validate the EspaiJove.net MHL test (EMHL) for Spanish adolescents by assessing its psychometric properties. The development of the EMHL test was conducted using item pool generation and a pilot study. A convenience sample of students aged 13–15 years (n = 355) participated in the validity study. Reliability was assessed for internal consistency and via test-retest. Convergent validity was evaluated by comparing the effect sizes among known groups with different levels of mental health knowledge, the correlation with mental health-related instruments, and the item discrimination index. A final version of a 35-item EMHL test was obtained with two parts: (i) a binary choice format (yes/no) for the identification of mental disorders; (ii) a multiple choice question with four possible answer options. Internal consistency was acceptable in the first part (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.744; Guttman’s lambda 2 = 0.773) and almost acceptable in the second part (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.615; Guttman’s lambda 2 = 0.643). The test-retest evaluation supported the stability of the test (first part, ICC = 0.578; second part, ICC = 0.422). No ceiling and floor effects were found. The EMHL test scores discriminated between known groups with different levels of mental health knowledge and it is associated with several-related constructs of MHL. Conclusions: The EMHL test is a relevant measure for assessing MHL in adolescents into Spanish context with acceptable validity and stability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional and Behavioural Adjustment in Adolescence)
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Article
Adolescents’ Life Satisfaction: The Role of Classroom, Family, Self-Concept and Gender
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 19; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17010019 - 18 Dec 2019
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 1794
Abstract
This study analyzes the direct relationships between classroom and family context and adolescent students’ life satisfaction (LS) and the indirect relationships between these same variables through adolescents’ academic, family, and social self-concept from a gender perspective. In the theoretical model, we assume that [...] Read more.
This study analyzes the direct relationships between classroom and family context and adolescent students’ life satisfaction (LS) and the indirect relationships between these same variables through adolescents’ academic, family, and social self-concept from a gender perspective. In the theoretical model, we assume that the quality of the parent—child relationship affects adolescents’ LS both directly and indirectly through their self-concept. We assume that the quality of the classroom climate also affects adolescents’ LS through their self-concept. The sample consisted of 2373 adolescents (49.8% girls) aged 12 to 18 years (mean (M) = 14.69, standard deviation (SD) = 1.82). A structural equation model was tested to analyse the relationship between the variables. Subsequently, multigroup analysis was performed to determine the structural invariance of the model as a function of gender. The chi square and T-student test was 71.66. Results revealed a direct positive relationship between family environment and LS. Family and classroom environment were indirectly related to LS through their relationship with academic, family, and social self-concept. The result of multigroup analysis supports the structural invariance of the model in both sexes; therefore, the expected relationships are the same for boys and girls, making the model more generalizable and applicable. The practical and theoretical implications are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional and Behavioural Adjustment in Adolescence)
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Article
Cyberbullying, Aggressiveness, and Emotional Intelligence in Adolescence
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(24), 5079; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16245079 - 12 Dec 2019
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1888
Abstract
The devastating consequences of cyberbullying during adolescence justify the relevance of obtaining empirical evidence on the factors that may cause participation in its distinct roles. The goal of this study was to analyze the predictive capacity of aggressiveness (physical aggression, verbal aggression, anger, [...] Read more.
The devastating consequences of cyberbullying during adolescence justify the relevance of obtaining empirical evidence on the factors that may cause participation in its distinct roles. The goal of this study was to analyze the predictive capacity of aggressiveness (physical aggression, verbal aggression, anger, and hostility) and emotional intelligence (attention, understanding, and emotional regulation) with respect to being a victim, aggressor or victim–aggressor of cyberbullying during adolescence. The Screening for Peer Bullying, the Aggressiveness Questionnaire and the Trait Meta-Mood Scale-24 were administered to a sample of 1102 Spanish secondary education students, aged 12 to 18. In general, results revealed a higher probability of being a victim, aggressor or victim–aggressor as physical aggressiveness and anger increased. On the other hand, results revealed a low probability of being a victim, aggressor or victim–aggressor as emotional understanding and emotional regulation increased. These findings highlight the importance of considering said variables when creating prevention programs to stop or reduce the social and educational issue of cyberbullying during adolescence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional and Behavioural Adjustment in Adolescence)
Article
Social Emotional Health Survey-Secondary (SEHS-S): A Universal Screening Measure of Social-Emotional Strengths for Spanish-Speaking Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(24), 4982; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16244982 - 07 Dec 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1650
Abstract
The Social Emotional Health Survey-Secondary (SEHS-S), which is a measure of core psychological assets based on a higher-order model of Covitality, is comprised of 36 items and four latent traits (with three measured subscales): belief in self (self-efficacy, self-awareness, and persistence), belief in [...] Read more.
The Social Emotional Health Survey-Secondary (SEHS-S), which is a measure of core psychological assets based on a higher-order model of Covitality, is comprised of 36 items and four latent traits (with three measured subscales): belief in self (self-efficacy, self-awareness, and persistence), belief in others (school support, family coherence, and peer support), emotional competence (emotional regulation, behavioral self-control, and empathy), and engaged living (gratitude, zest, and optimism). Previous international studies have supported the psychometric properties of the SEHS-S. The present study extended this research by examining the psychometric properties of a Spanish-language adaptation with a sample of 1042 Spanish adolescents (Mage = 14.49, SD = 1.65.). Confirmatory factor analyses replicated the original factorial structure, with hierarchical omega between 0.66–0.93, with 0.94 for the total score. Factorial invariance across genders revealed small latent mean differences. A path model evaluated concurrent validity, which revealed a significant association between Covitality and bidimensional mental health (psychological distress and well-being). Specifically, correlational analyses showed a negative association with internalizing/externalizing symptoms, and positive associations with subjective well-being, health-related quality of life, and prosocial behaviors. This study provides an example of a culturally relevant adaptation of an international tool to measure student strengths, which is critical to planning school programming and policy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional and Behavioural Adjustment in Adolescence)
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Article
Subtyping of Adolescents with School Refusal Behavior: Exploring Differences Across Profiles in Self-Concept
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(23), 4780; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16234780 - 28 Nov 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1150
Abstract
Not all adolescents with school attendance problems attribute their behavior to the same causes. Knowing the subtypes of students who reject school and their relationship with new variables, such as self-concept, is an unresolved task. This study aimed to identify different school refusal [...] Read more.
Not all adolescents with school attendance problems attribute their behavior to the same causes. Knowing the subtypes of students who reject school and their relationship with new variables, such as self-concept, is an unresolved task. This study aimed to identify different school refusal behavior profiles and to determine whether these profiles differed from each other based on the scores of the eleven dimensions of self-concept (Physical appearance, Physical abilities, Parent relations, Same-sex relations, Opposite-sex relations, Honesty, Emotional stability, Self-esteem, Verbal, Math, and General school). The participants were 1315 Spanish students (57.6% male) aged 12–18 years (M = 15.21; SD = 1.74). The School Refusal Assessment Scale-Revised and the Self-Description Questionnaire II-Short Form were administered. A latent class analysis revealed four school refusal behavior profiles: Moderately High School Refusal Behavior, Moderately Low School Refusal Behavior, Mixed School Refusal Behavior and Non-School Refusal Behavior. The results indicated that the Mixed School Refusal Behavior group was the most maladaptive profile and revealed the lowest mean scores on self-concept. In contrast, Non-School Refusal and Moderately Low School Refusal Behavior groups revealed the highest scores in all dimensions of self-concept. Implications for working toward the prevention of school refusal in students with low self-concept are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional and Behavioural Adjustment in Adolescence)
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Article
A ‘Control Model’ of Social Media Engagement in Adolescence: A Grounded Theory Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(23), 4696; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16234696 - 25 Nov 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2450
Abstract
Adolescents actively use social media, which engages them cognitively, emotionally, and behaviorally. However, the underlying psychological mechanisms of engagement have not been adequately addressed. The present study examined adolescents’ psychological processes as these develop in their everyday interactions via social media. The sample [...] Read more.
Adolescents actively use social media, which engages them cognitively, emotionally, and behaviorally. However, the underlying psychological mechanisms of engagement have not been adequately addressed. The present study examined adolescents’ psychological processes as these develop in their everyday interactions via social media. The sample comprised six focus groups with 42 adolescents from UK-based schools. Data were analyzed using constructivist grounded theory. The resulting concepts related to individual, social, and structurally related processes, highlighting a synergy between the processes underlying use and a gradual reduction of control as individual, social, and structurally led processes emerge, conceptualized as the ‘control model’ of social media engagement. The findings highlight a controlling aspect in engagement and a dynamic interplay between the processes as mutually determining the quality and the intensity of the interaction. Recommendations are provided for examining control as a main emotional, cognitive, and behavioral mechanism in problematic and/or addictive social media and smartphone use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional and Behavioural Adjustment in Adolescence)
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Article
Predicting Adolescent Adjustment and Well-Being: The Interplay between Socio-Emotional and Personal Factors
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(23), 4650; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16234650 - 22 Nov 2019
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 1531
Abstract
Social and emotional factors such as emotional competence and self-esteem are protective factors that promote adolescent mental health and well-being. In this paper, we will examine the combined contribution of these socio-emotional factors in addition to personal factors, in the prediction of psychological [...] Read more.
Social and emotional factors such as emotional competence and self-esteem are protective factors that promote adolescent mental health and well-being. In this paper, we will examine the combined contribution of these socio-emotional factors in addition to personal factors, in the prediction of psychological adjustment and subjective well-being in adolescence. The study included 840 adolescents aged between 12 and 16 years old (M = 13.37, SD = 1.16, 51.4% girls). We measured personal variables (sex, age, number of siblings), socio-emotional variables (emotional competence and self-esteem), psychological adjustment (emotional and behavioural problems) and subjective well-being (life satisfaction and affect balance). Besides descriptive analysis and Pearson bivariate correlations, two different methodologies were performed, including hierarchical regression models and a fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA). The results show that emotional competence is a protective factor for optimal adjustment and well-being, and suggest that self-esteem reinforces this relation. Different patterns were observed for female and male adolescents of different ages and with different family backgrounds. The practical implications of our findings for intervention programs have been discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional and Behavioural Adjustment in Adolescence)
Article
Family Communication and Verbal Child-to-Parent Violence among Adolescents: The Mediating Role of Perceived Stress
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(22), 4538; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16224538 - 16 Nov 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1417
Abstract
In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of reported incidents of child-to-parent violence (CPV); however, this type of intra-family violence remains vastly understudied compared with other forms of family violence. The aim of this study is to analyze the [...] Read more.
In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of reported incidents of child-to-parent violence (CPV); however, this type of intra-family violence remains vastly understudied compared with other forms of family violence. The aim of this study is to analyze the relationship between family communication and verbal CPV through the mediation of adolescent perceived stress. The sample consisted of 2399 Spanish students of both genders between the ages of 11 and 20 years. Results show that problematic family communication is a risk factor for the presence of verbally abusive behavior towards parents, with a direct and indirect relationship through perceived stress. Open family communication is presented as a protective factor against verbally abusive behavior due to a negative relationship with perceived stress. Results point to a mediating role of perceived stress, which would explain the mechanism which links the quality of family communication to verbal violence towards parents. Implications of these results are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional and Behavioural Adjustment in Adolescence)
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Article
Parental Socialization, School Adjustment and Cyber-Aggression among Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(20), 4005; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16204005 - 19 Oct 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1648
Abstract
The objective of the present study is to analyse the relationships between parental socialization styles—indulgent, authoritarian, authoritative and negligent, school adjustment (social integration, academic competence and family involvement) and cyber-aggression (direct and indirect) in adolescents. Participating in this study were 1304 Spanish students [...] Read more.
The objective of the present study is to analyse the relationships between parental socialization styles—indulgent, authoritarian, authoritative and negligent, school adjustment (social integration, academic competence and family involvement) and cyber-aggression (direct and indirect) in adolescents. Participating in this study were 1304 Spanish students of both sexes (53.1% girls), aged between 12 and 18 years (M = 13.87, SD = 1.33). Multivariate analyses of variance were performed. The results showed significant relationships between parental socialization styles, school adjustment and cyber-aggression. It was observed that adolescents from indulgent and authoritative families showed greater academic competence and greater family involvement. Additionally, the children from authoritarian families displayed greater involvement in direct and indirect cyber-aggression behaviours. The results obtained and their implications are discussed in the final section. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional and Behavioural Adjustment in Adolescence)
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Article
What is the Role of Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms in Adolescent Suicide Behaviors?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(14), 2511; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16142511 - 14 Jul 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1702
Abstract
Suicide is the second leading cause of death in adolescents and young adults aged 15 to 29 years. Specifically, the presence of internalizing and externalizing symptomatology is related to increased risk for suicide at these ages. Few studies have analyzed the relations between [...] Read more.
Suicide is the second leading cause of death in adolescents and young adults aged 15 to 29 years. Specifically, the presence of internalizing and externalizing symptomatology is related to increased risk for suicide at these ages. Few studies have analyzed the relations between these symptoms and their role as mediators in predicting suicide behavior. This study aimed to examine the relation between internalizing and externalizing symptomatology and suicide behaviors through a longitudinal study. The sample consisted of 238 adolescents aged 12 to 18 years. The data were analyzed via the PROCESS Statistical Package. The main results showed that previous depression symptoms had a significant indirect effect, through previous suicide behaviors and current depression symptoms, on current suicide behaviors, accounting for 61% of the total variance explained. Additionally, being a girl increased this risk. Therefore, the implementation of early identification and intervention programs to address youth symptoms of depression and suicidal behaviors could significantly reduce the risk for future suicidal behaviors in adolescence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional and Behavioural Adjustment in Adolescence)
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Article
Family Communication Problems, Psychosocial Adjustment and Cyberbullying
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(13), 2417; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16132417 - 08 Jul 2019
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2432
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to analyze the relationship between family communication problems and cyberbullying, through psychosocial adjustment—psychological distress, attitude towards institutional authority, and problematic use of social networking sites—in adolescents. Random sampling by conglomerates was performed. A total of 8115 [...] Read more.
The aim of the present study was to analyze the relationship between family communication problems and cyberbullying, through psychosocial adjustment—psychological distress, attitude towards institutional authority, and problematic use of social networking sites—in adolescents. Random sampling by conglomerates was performed. A total of 8115 adolescents participated in the study (51.5% boys, 49.5% girls), and were aged between 11 and 16 years old (M = 13.34, SD = 1.04) and enrolled in the State of Nuevo León (Mexico). A structural equations model was developed using the Structural Equation Modeling Software (EQS). The results showed that problematic family communication is directly associated with cyberbullying, and also indirectly through the relationships of psychological distress and attitude towards transgression of social norms with the problematic use of social networking sites. The multi-group analyses also revealed gender differences in these relationships. Finally, the obtained results were discussed and their practical implications were shown. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional and Behavioural Adjustment in Adolescence)
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Article
The Influence of Bullying and Cyberbullying in the Psychological Adjustment of Victims and Aggressors in Adolescence
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(12), 2080; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16122080 - 12 Jun 2019
Cited by 34 | Viewed by 3620
Abstract
The objective of the present study was to analyze the extent to which violent peer behavior and victimization, both traditional and cybernetic, and predict certain indicators of psychological maladjustment in adolescents, such as self-concept, satisfaction with life, feeling of loneliness, depressive symptomatology, perceived [...] Read more.
The objective of the present study was to analyze the extent to which violent peer behavior and victimization, both traditional and cybernetic, and predict certain indicators of psychological maladjustment in adolescents, such as self-concept, satisfaction with life, feeling of loneliness, depressive symptomatology, perceived stress, social anxiety, empathy, and emotional intelligence. Participants in the study were 1318 adolescents of both sexes, aged between 11 and 18 years and enrolled in Compulsory Secondary Education schools. The design of the study was cross-sectional. The results indicated that the victims generally present greater maladjustment than the aggressors. Both victims and cybervictims showed a greater decrease in all the dimensions of self-concept, compared with aggressors and cyberaggressors. However, the two types of aggressors showed a higher likelihood of presenting low levels of empathy. Feeling of loneliness, depressive symptomatology, perceived stress, and degree of life satisfaction was more probable to be present in all groups of aggressors and victims. Finally, with regard to emotional intelligence, victims had a higher probability of obtaining low scores in all the dimensions of this construct; this was the case for traditional aggressors only in the dimension of emotion regulation. These results contribute to our understanding of the consequences of harassment in the adaptation of the students involved, with relevant practical implications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional and Behavioural Adjustment in Adolescence)
Article
Motivational Profiles of High School Physical Education Students: The Role of Controlling Teacher Behavior
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(10), 1714; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16101714 - 16 May 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1614
Abstract
(1) Background: The purpose of this study was to identify distinct motivational profiles in high school Physical Education students. These motivational profiles were examined in relation to controlling teacher behaviors, as well as to various psychological correlates including the perceived importance of [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The purpose of this study was to identify distinct motivational profiles in high school Physical Education students. These motivational profiles were examined in relation to controlling teacher behaviors, as well as to various psychological correlates including the perceived importance of physical activity to the student, student intentions to be physically active, psychological need satisfaction and current physical activity levels. (2) Methods: 416 high school Physical Education students comprised the sample. (3) Results: Cluster analysis and additional multivariate analyses revealed two motivational profiles, Wilk’s Λ = 0.56, F (7, 431) = 45.50, p < 0.01. The “Self-Determined” profile was characterized by high levels of self-determined motivation; high levels of competence, autonomy and relatedness; importance of physical activity; stronger intentions to engage in physical activity; and greater current actual physical activity involvement. The “Less Self-Determined” profile was associated with the perception of controlling teacher behaviors, and with greater external regulation and amotivation. (4) Conclusions: These findings help to provide new insights into the explanation of student motivation in Physical Education and the design of intervention programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional and Behavioural Adjustment in Adolescence)
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Article
Coaches’ Motivational Style and Athletes’ Fear of Failure
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(9), 1563; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16091563 - 04 May 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2112
Abstract
Background: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between coaches’ interpersonal style and fear of failure in athletes. Methods: A sample of 340 athletes at the Federation Level with a mean age of 18.96 years (SD = [...] Read more.
Background: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between coaches’ interpersonal style and fear of failure in athletes. Methods: A sample of 340 athletes at the Federation Level with a mean age of 18.96 years (SD = 5.69 years.) comprised the sample. Athletes completed questionnaires related to fear of failure in sports as well as their perceptions of the extent to which their coaches provided support for athlete autonomy and control. Results: The results revealed a significant and positive relationship between coaches’ controlling style and athletes’ fear of failure whereas coach autonomy support was associated with reduced fear of failure. Through the use of cluster analysis, two athlete profiles emerged. One profile indicated moderate levels of fear of failure among those athletes who perceived a controlling coaching style. The second profile revealed a cluster of athletes with low levels of fear of failure and favorable perceptions of coach support for athlete autonomy. Conclusions: These findings provide further evidence for the role of coaches as social influences capable of contributing to both adaptive and maladaptive psychological outcomes for athletes in sports. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional and Behavioural Adjustment in Adolescence)
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Review

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Review
Well-Being and Romantic Relationships: A Systematic Review in Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(13), 2415; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16132415 - 07 Jul 2019
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 4444
Abstract
Adolescence and emerging adulthood are both stages in which romantic relationships play a key role in development and can be a source of both well-being and negative outcomes. However, the limited number of studies prior to adulthood, along with the multiplicity of variables [...] Read more.
Adolescence and emerging adulthood are both stages in which romantic relationships play a key role in development and can be a source of both well-being and negative outcomes. However, the limited number of studies prior to adulthood, along with the multiplicity of variables involved in the romantic context and the considerable ambiguity surrounding the construct of well-being, make it difficult to reach conclusions about the relationship between the two phenomena. This systematic review synthesizes the results produced into this topic over the last three decades. A total of 112 studies were included, following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Protocols (PRISMA-P) guidelines. On the one hand, these works revealed the terminological heterogeneity in research on well-being and the way the absence of symptoms of illness are commonly used to measure it, while on the other hand, they also showed that romantic relationships can be an important source of well-being for both adolescents and emerging adults. The findings underline the importance of providing a better definition of well-being, as well as to attribute greater value to the significance of romantic relationships. Devoting greater empirical, educational, and community efforts to romantic development in the stages leading up to adulthood are considered necessary actions in promoting the well-being of young people. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional and Behavioural Adjustment in Adolescence)
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Other

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Perspective
International and Spanish Findings in Scientific Literature about Minors’ Mental Health: Predictive Factors Using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(9), 1603; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16091603 - 08 May 2019
Viewed by 1146
Abstract
Minors’ mental health is a subject of high global concern. Understanding the factors that influence their mental health is essential to improving the health of future generations. In this study, an analysis of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire’s usefulness is carried out, as [...] Read more.
Minors’ mental health is a subject of high global concern. Understanding the factors that influence their mental health is essential to improving the health of future generations. In this study, an analysis of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire’s usefulness is carried out, as a validated tool, recognized in Spain and internationally, for the measurement of minors’ mental health. In turn, the influence of the variables of gender, age, and physical health, along with the occupational social class of parents on Spanish minors’ mental health, has been analyzed. Spanish minors with good physical health and of parents with middle and higher education, as well as in an occupational social class, are less likely to suffer mental health problems. On the other hand, it seems that internalizing symptoms are more likely in girls, and externalizing symptoms are more likely in boys. However, when a global measure of mental health is made without specific subscales, the effects of gender and age diverge greatly, according to the studies. Although there are examples of current research using the same measurement tool, there is still a need for many more international studies that are coordinated using the same methodology. This study identifies the factors which the international and Spanish scientific literature has revealed as being determinants in minors’ mental health. Finally, it is essential that the influence of these factors be assessed in the areas of primary care and mental health to facilitate better detection, intervention, or prevention of mental health problems in today’s children, as well as the children of future generations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional and Behavioural Adjustment in Adolescence)
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