Special Issue "Exercise Training for Neuromuscular Fatigue"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Sport and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Serge S. Colson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratoire Motricité Humaine, Expertise, Sport, Santé (LAMHESS), Université Côte d'Azur, EUR HEALTHY, 06205 Nice, France
Interests: neuromuscular fatigue; influence of specific mode of muscular solicitation; psycho-physiological interaction during exercise or physical activity; aging and frailty

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fatigue is a common multifaceted symptom experienced by the majority of people throughout their lifespan. Since the publication of Angelo Mosso’s book in 1891 entitled La Fatica, many studies have sought to increase our knowledge on the different forms of fatigue (e.g., acute fatigue occurring after physical or mental exercises, or chronic fatigue felt by health-compromised individuals) in various experimental conditions. A better understanding of fatigue can help coaches and clinicians to implement targeted exercise training programs for specific populations. For example, fatigue can limit sport performance, but exercise training has the potential to delay the occurrence of fatigue. Under various pathological conditions, exercise training may help patients overcome the symptom of fatigue that influences their quality of life and daily routine. Hence, the aim of this Special Issue is to present original articles that investigate the effect of exercise training programs on fatigue, with a particular emphasis on neuromuscular fatigue, defined as a diminution in maximal force or power production in response to acute exercise. Studies investigating the influence of training programs in healthy and/or health-compromised individuals are encouraged. Literature reviews and meta-analyses focusing on this research topic will be also considered. Accepted articles will be published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

Prof. Dr. Serge S. Colson
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fatigue
  • training
  • performance
  • rehabilitation
  • health
  • quality of life
  • exercise
  • physical activity
  • strength
  • well-being

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Endocannabinoids and Heart Rate Variability Alterations after Exposure to Prolonged Intensive Physical Exercise of the Hellenic Navy SEALs
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(1), 28; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph19010028 - 21 Dec 2021
Viewed by 350
Abstract
Background: Recent research indicates that both endocannabinoids (eCB) and heart rate variability (HRV) are associated with stress-induced experiences. However, these underlying mechanisms are not elucidated. The present study aims to investigate whether exposure to acute and chronic stress conditions can give rise to [...] Read more.
Background: Recent research indicates that both endocannabinoids (eCB) and heart rate variability (HRV) are associated with stress-induced experiences. However, these underlying mechanisms are not elucidated. The present study aims to investigate whether exposure to acute and chronic stress conditions can give rise to measurable changes, both to the peripheral eCB ligands and HRV. Methods: Thirteen candidates under intense preparation for their enlistment in the Hellenic Navy SEALs (HNS) participated in the study. All subjects underwent mental state examination, while HRV variables in time and frequency domain recordings were acquired. Furthermore, at baseline and 30 days after prolonged and intensive physical exercise, hair was collected to measure eCB ligands, such as anandamide (AEA), 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and the N-acyl ethanolamine (NAE) molecules: palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and oleoylethanolamide (OEA). Results: Comparing basal hair concentrations of eCB ligands before and after intense physical exercise, we found that AEA, PEA, and OEA were notably increased, whereas no differences were observed regarding the ligand 2-AG. Furthermore, there were observed associations between the concentrations of peripheral eCB ligands, both at baseline and after the prolonged physical exercise and the time and frequency domains of HRV. Conclusions: These findings suggest that endocannabinoid–HRV interrelations might share a short-term, and long-term adaptability of the changes in self-regulation associated with stress. Further studies will be required to determine the validity of peripheral eCB signaling and HRV as a biomarker for different aspects of the stress response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exercise Training for Neuromuscular Fatigue)
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