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Special Issue "Feature Papers: Global Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Jon Øyvind Odland
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Public Health and Nursing, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, 9037 Tromso, Norway
Interests: inequality in health; environment and health; climate change and health; pregnancy and early childhood health; epidemiology and population registries
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will focus on migrating people in times of societies in transition. Many academic institutions have initiated educational programs, focused on immersive learning, and there is a lot to learn. A multidisciplinary training approach on migrant and refugee health is in scope, as well as public health challenges for infectious surveillance and treatment, mental disorders, people migrating with physical disabilities, and special challenges for the very young and the old people. Working conditions for the new country men and women are important, as well as how migrating can people use their skills in their new country and how both the host and the immigrant can make satisfactory social relations together. We have new challenges, but these challenges are well known historically. There have been numerous migrating populations through the history, and we have always adapted in the end. However, we have big challenges to meet and solve. This Special Issue is meant to contribute to a positive development, based on scientific methodology from a public health perspective. We hope to receive numerous excellent papers and would like to grant a discount for your submissions.

Prof. Dr. Jon Øyvind Odland
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Public health challenges in a society in transition
  • Migration health
  • Infectious diseases in migrating populations
  • Mental disorders in migrating populations
  • Disabled people in difficult social conditions
  • Special challenges for children and adolescent refugees and migrants
  • Special challenges for old people in migration
  • Work possibilities for migrants
  • Social adaptation in times of transition

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Article
Geographical Aspects of Recent Trends in Drug-Related Deaths, with a Focus on Intra-National Contextual Variation
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8081; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17218081 - 02 Nov 2020
Viewed by 591
Abstract
Background. Recent worldwide estimates are of 53 million users of opioids annually, and of 585,000 drug-related deaths, of which two thirds are due to opioids. There are considerable international differences in levels of drug death rates and substance abuse. However, there are also [...] Read more.
Background. Recent worldwide estimates are of 53 million users of opioids annually, and of 585,000 drug-related deaths, of which two thirds are due to opioids. There are considerable international differences in levels of drug death rates and substance abuse. However, there are also considerable variations within countries in drug misuse, overdose rates, and in drug death rates particularly. Wide intra-national variations characterize countries where drug deaths have risen fastest in recent years, such as the US and UK. Drug deaths are an outcome of drug misuse, which can ideally be studied at a relatively low spatial scale (e.g., US counties). The research literature suggests that small area variations in drug deaths to a considerable degree reflect contextual (place-related) factors as well as individual risk factors. Methods. We consider the role of area social status, social cohesion, segregation, urbanicity, and drug supply in an ecological regression analysis of county differences in drug deaths in the US during 2015–2017. Results. The analysis of US small area data highlights a range of factors which are statistically significant in explaining differences in drug deaths, but with no risk factor having a predominant role. Comparisons with other countries where small area drug mortality data have been analyzed show differences between countries in the impact of different contextual factors, but some common themes. Conclusions. Intra-national differences in drug-related deaths are considerable, but there are significant research gaps in the evidence base for small area analysis of such deaths. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers: Global Health)
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Article
Profile of Mothers of Children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: A Population-Based Study in Canada
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 7986; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17217986 - 30 Oct 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 915
Abstract
Objective: To compare the characteristics of mothers of children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) with mothers of typically developing control children. Methods: The study utilized a cross-sectional, observational design, using active case ascertainment. Biological mothers were interviewed using a standardized retrospective questionnaire [...] Read more.
Objective: To compare the characteristics of mothers of children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) with mothers of typically developing control children. Methods: The study utilized a cross-sectional, observational design, using active case ascertainment. Biological mothers were interviewed using a standardized retrospective questionnaire to collect data on demographics, living environment, pregnancy history, nutrition, alcohol and other drug use prior to and following pregnancy recognition. Results: A total of 173 mothers were interviewed. Of these, 19 had a child who was diagnosed with FASD, five had a child who had received a deferred FASD diagnosis, and 37 had children who were selected into the control group as typically developing children. The remaining 112 mothers had children who did not meet diagnostic criteria for FASD. The mothers of children with FASD did not differ significantly from mothers of the control group children with respect to age, ethnicity, marital status, and employment status at the time of pregnancy. However, mothers of children with FASD had lower levels of education (p < 0.01) and were more likely to have received financial support (p < 0.05) at the time of pregnancy, to have smoked tobacco (p < 0.001), and to have used marijuana or hashish (p < 0.01) prior to pregnancy recognition, compared with mothers of control children. All mothers of children with FASD reported alcohol consumption prior to pregnancy recognition; however, only 10.5% reported alcohol consumption following pregnancy recognition. None of the mothers interviewed reported any drug use following pregnancy recognition. Conclusions: Population-based preventive interventions, including repeated screening, monitoring, and education regarding the effects of alcohol use, as well as other substances, before and during pregnancy, are needed to eliminate risk for FASD and other negative consequences on child and maternal health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers: Global Health)
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Article
Perceived Needs Among Asylum Seekers in Sweden: A Mixed Methods Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 4983; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17144983 - 10 Jul 2020
Viewed by 908
Abstract
The health and well-being of asylum seekers in high-income countries is a concern from both individual and community perspectives. This study aims to describe the perceived needs of adult asylum seekers in Sweden. A mixed methods study was conducted that combined a non-randomized [...] Read more.
The health and well-being of asylum seekers in high-income countries is a concern from both individual and community perspectives. This study aims to describe the perceived needs of adult asylum seekers in Sweden. A mixed methods study was conducted that combined a non-randomized descriptive cross-sectional assessment of perceived serious needs using the Humanitarian Emergency Settings Perceived Needs Scale (HESPER) Web with 85 adult asylum seekers and focus group discussions with 14 adult asylum seekers in Sweden. Descriptive and comparative statistics were used for the quantitative part, and thematic analysis for the qualitative part. The total number of perceived serious needs reported by respondents ranged from zero to 13 needs per person with a mean of four needs (SD 2.71). The most commonly perceived serious needs were related to income or livelihood, separation from loved ones, being displaced from home, distress, and concerns about accessing adequate health care services. Many of the perceived needs appeared to be related to experiences of being dependent, in limbo, and vulnerable. Addressing people’s current perceived needs can contribute to resilience and well-being and therefore should be considered in health care systems that cater to immigrants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers: Global Health)
Article
Vaya Con Dios: The Influence of Religious Constructs on Stressors around the Migration Process and U.S. Lived Experiences among Latina/o Immigrants
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 3961; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17113961 - 03 Jun 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 997
Abstract
This qualitative study explores the role of religious practices on the migration process and the U.S. lived experiences of Latina/o immigrants. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 20 Latino/a immigrant adults living in a southern state of the United States. Interviews focused on participants’ [...] Read more.
This qualitative study explores the role of religious practices on the migration process and the U.S. lived experiences of Latina/o immigrants. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 20 Latino/a immigrant adults living in a southern state of the United States. Interviews focused on participants’ migration experiences, religious constructs, and stress responses. Results revealed that religious practices provided strength, well-being, and positive life outlook during the migration process. After migration, religious practices also assisted participants in creating a sense of community/family, as well as provided financial and social support during difficult times. Recommendations for future interdisciplinary research and for practitioners are discussed for individuals working with Latinx and immigrant populations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers: Global Health)
Article
Migration, Stress and the Challenges of Accessing Food: An Exploratory Study of the Experience of Recent Afghan Women Refugees in Adelaide, Australia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1379; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17041379 - 21 Feb 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1859
Abstract
This study explored the migration and food experiences of Afghani women refugees residing in Adelaide, South Australia for 2 years or less. In-depth semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 10 women between May and September 2017. The data were thematically analysed, and the [...] Read more.
This study explored the migration and food experiences of Afghani women refugees residing in Adelaide, South Australia for 2 years or less. In-depth semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 10 women between May and September 2017. The data were thematically analysed, and the Social Determinants of Health Framework was used to discuss the findings. Five key themes emerged from the data. In the transition country (Iran/Pakistan), respondents experienced (i) trauma, discrimination and exclusion and (ii) familiar food culture, but food stress. In the destination country (Adelaide, Australia) respondents experienced (iii) a sense of precariousness, (iv) unfamiliar food culture and (v) challenges in accessing halal food. Afghani refugees experienced considerable stressors both in the transition and the final destination country but for different reasons. In the transition country, stresses related to the lack of social services and support, discrimination, racism and poverty seemed to have affected their ability to afford food. In Australia stressors pertaining to socioeconomic, housing and employment precariousness, as well as difficulties in accessing halal foods were identified as challenges. Furthermore, food stress in Australia was associated with the cultural appropriateness of food, the complexity of the food system, and the women’s lack of skills and experiences in navigating the food system. With increasing refugee and immigration flows globally, it is necessary to acknowledge how food and social determinants intersect for refugee immigrants to ensure positive health outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers: Global Health)
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Intersection of Migration and Access to Health Care: Experiences and Perceptions of Female Economic Migrants in Canada
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3682; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103682 - 23 May 2020
Viewed by 991
Abstract
More people are migrating than ever before. There are an estimated 1 billion migrants globally—of whom, 258 million are international migrants and 763 million are internal migrants. Almost half of these migrants are women, and most are of reproductive age. Female migration has [...] Read more.
More people are migrating than ever before. There are an estimated 1 billion migrants globally—of whom, 258 million are international migrants and 763 million are internal migrants. Almost half of these migrants are women, and most are of reproductive age. Female migration has increased. The socioeconomic contexts of women migrants need investigation to better understand how migration intersects with accessing health care. We employed a focused ethnography design. We recruited 29 women from three African countries: Ghana, Nigeria, and South Africa. We used purposive and convenient sampling techniques and collected data using face-to-face interviews. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed with the support of ATLAS.ti 8 Windows (ATLAS.ti Scientific Software Development GmbH), a computer-based qualitative software for data management. We interviewed 10 women from both South Africa and Ghana and nine women from Nigeria. Their ages ranged between 24 and 64 years. The four themes that developed included social connectedness to navigate access to care, the influence of place of origin on access to care, experiences of financial accessibility, and historical and cultural orientation to accessing health care. It was clear that theses factors affected economic migrant women’s access to health care after migration. Canada has a universal health care system but multiple research studies have documented that migrants have significant barriers to accessing health care. Most migrants indeed arrive in Canada from a health care system that is very different than their country of origin. Access to health care is one of the most important social determinants of health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers: Global Health)
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