Special Issue "Healthy Ageing Commuities"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Communication and Informatics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Myo Nyein Aung
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Advanced Research Institute for Health Sciences and Faculty of International Liberal Arts, Juntendo University, Tokyo 113-8421, Japan
Interests: healthy ageing communities
Dr. Thin Nyein Nyein Aung
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Public Health, Juntendo University, Tokyo 113-8421, Japan
Interests: ageing; NCD prevention; rehabilitation; frality

Special Issue Information

Population ageing is a global phenomenon. Around the world, the epidemiological burden has shifted to age-related, noncommunicable diseases, whereas long-term care for older people is not yet systematically financed in many countries. While universal access to health and long-term care is the objective of many countries, health promotion that encourages people to lead a healthy and productive life is increasingly important; however, it has yet to be addressed in many parts of the world. This Special Issue will bring together papers that focus on evidence and practices that lead to healthy ageing in the scope of public health, social policy, and several areas in gerontology.

Research that examines how older people can age healthily are urgently required. Intervention studies that assess the effectiveness of community-integrated models are required in both high- and low-income countries. Observational studies that determine the factors that influence healthy ageing and quality of life will help create policies to address the determinants of healthy ageing communities. In addition, qualitative and mixed-method studies are important to help us understand the interaction and conceptual frameworks of several determinants in different context.

Aside from health promotion, this Special Issue welcomes research that addresses health and social care in communities, the strengthening of informal care, and care prevention for the older people.

Dr. Myo Nyein Aung
Dr. Thin Nyein Nyein Aung
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • community
  • family
  • care
  • ageing
  • health promotion
  • age-friendly environment
  • NCDs
  • dementia
  • frailty
  • policy

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Factors Influencing the Willingness of Palliative Care Utilization among the Older Population with Active Cancers: A Case Study in Mandalay, Myanmar
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 7887; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18157887 - 26 Jul 2021
Viewed by 597
Abstract
Palliative care is an effective, multidisciplinary healthcare service to alleviate severe illness patients from physical, psychological, and spiritual pain. However, global palliative care has been underutilized, especially in developing countries. This cross-sectional survey aimed to examine the factors associated with older cancer patients’ [...] Read more.
Palliative care is an effective, multidisciplinary healthcare service to alleviate severe illness patients from physical, psychological, and spiritual pain. However, global palliative care has been underutilized, especially in developing countries. This cross-sectional survey aimed to examine the factors associated with older cancer patients’ willingness to utilize palliative care services in Myanmar. The final sample was composed of 141 older adults, 50-years of age and above who suffered from cancers at any stage. Simple random sampling was applied to choose the participants by purposively selecting three oncology clinics with daycare chemotherapy centers in Mandalay. We collected data using structured questionnaires composed of five sections. The sections include the participant’s socio-economic information, disease status, knowledge of palliative care, psychosocial and spiritual need, practical need, and willingness to utilize palliative care services. The study found that approximately 85% of older cancer patients are willing to receive palliative care services. The significant predictors of willingness to utilize palliative care services include place of living, better palliative care knowledge, more need for spiritual and psychosocial support, and practical support. This study can guide health policymakers in increasing the rate of palliative care utilization. The suggested policies include developing community-level palliative care services in Myanmar, especially in rural areas, promoting palliative care knowledge, applying appropriate religious and spiritual traditions at palliative treatment, and developing suitable medicines for the critically ill. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthy Ageing Commuities)
Article
Typology of Family Support in Home Care for Iranian Older People: A Qualitative Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6361; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18126361 - 11 Jun 2021
Viewed by 788
Abstract
The world population is rapidly aging. In older people, age-related biological decline in most body systems causes functional decline, an increase in dependence, and an increased need for support, especially by their family members. The aim of this study was to explore the [...] Read more.
The world population is rapidly aging. In older people, age-related biological decline in most body systems causes functional decline, an increase in dependence, and an increased need for support, especially by their family members. The aim of this study was to explore the main aspects of family support for older parents in home care. This qualitative study was conducted using a deductive qualitative content analysis approach. Participants were 21 older parents living in their own homes, as well as four family members of some participants. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews and then were analyzed using the primary matrix developed based on the existing literature. The main aspects of family support for older parents were grouped into five predetermined categories and one new category: “instrumental support”, “financial support”, “psycho-emotional support”, “healthcare-related support”, “informational-technological support”, and “social preference support “. Family support for older people in home care is a multi-dimensional phenomenon. Family members can identify the needs of their older parents and provide them with appropriate support in collaboration with healthcare professionals to enhance their quality of life, autonomy, and satisfaction with life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthy Ageing Commuities)
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Article
Estimating Service Demand for Intermediary Care at a Community Integrated Intermediary Care Center among Family Caregivers of Older Adults Residing in Chiang Mai, Northern Thailand
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 6087; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18116087 - 04 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 954
Abstract
Background: Thailand’s population is currently the third most rapidly aging in the world, with an estimated 20 million ageing population by 2050. Sustainability of the family based long-term care model is challenged by the chronic burden on family caregivers and by smaller family [...] Read more.
Background: Thailand’s population is currently the third most rapidly aging in the world, with an estimated 20 million ageing population by 2050. Sustainability of the family based long-term care model is challenged by the chronic burden on family caregivers and by smaller family sizes. We aimed to introduce a new service model, Community Integrated Intermediary Care (CIIC), TCTR20190412004, including free of charge intermediary care services at CIIC centers in the local community, to help older adults whose caregivers are temporarily unable to sustain care at home. Since Thai society upholds values of gratefulness, it is better to estimate willingness to use such an intermediary care service first, before introducing the service. Methods: A total of 867 pairs of senior citizens and their family caregivers were interviewed with structured-questionnaires in 2019. Descriptive analysis and binary logistic regression were applied to determine the predictors of family caregivers’ willingness to use the CIIC service, guided by Anderson’s model of health services use. Results: About 26.8% of elderly participants and 24.0% of family caregivers were willing to use an intermediary care service. The family caregiver determinants of predisposing factors (kinship: spouse caregivers, other relatives, maid or friends; job types: own business and private company staff), enabling factors (original community residents and monthly income ≤9000 baht), and need factors (caregiver burden total scores ≥24, taking leave for caregiving, and having diabetes), were found to be significantly associated with willingness to use the CIIC service. Conclusions: The baseline survey data noted that caregivers’ sociodemographic factors and burden determined their willingness to use the intermediary care service, although the dependency of care recipients was low in this study. This, nonetheless, indicated that there is need for a backup respite care to strengthen current family based long-term aging care in Thailand. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthy Ageing Commuities)
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Article
Caregiver Burden and Associated Factors for the Respite Care Needs among the Family Caregivers of Community Dwelling Senior Citizens in Chiang Mai, Northern Thailand
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5873; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115873 - 30 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1363
Abstract
Background: Families are the backbone of caregiving for older adults living in communities. This is a tradition common to Thailand and many low- and middle-income countries where formal long-term care services are not so available or accessible. Therefore, population aging demands more and [...] Read more.
Background: Families are the backbone of caregiving for older adults living in communities. This is a tradition common to Thailand and many low- and middle-income countries where formal long-term care services are not so available or accessible. Therefore, population aging demands more and more young people engaging as family caregivers. Informal caregiving can become an unexpected duty for anyone anytime. However, studies measuring the burden of informal caregivers are limited. We aimed to determine the caregiver burden, both from the perspective of the caregivers as well as that of their care recipients. Method: We used the baseline survey data from a cluster randomized controlled trial providing a community integrated intermediary care (CIIC) service for seniors in Chiang Mai, Thailand, TCTR20190412004. Study participants were 867 pairs of older adults and their primary family caregivers. Descriptive analysis explored the characteristics of the caregivers and binary logistic regression identified factors influencing the caregivers’ burden. Results: The mean age of family caregivers was 55.27 ± 13.7 years and 5.5% indicated the need for respite care with Caregiver Burden Inventory (CBI) scores ≥24. The highest burden was noted in the time-dependence burden domain (25.7%). The significant associated factors affecting CBI ≥24 were as follows: caregivers older than 60 years, being female, current smokers, having diabetes, and caring for seniors with probable depression and moderate to severe dependency. Conclusions: A quarter of caregivers can have their careers disturbed because of the time consumed with caregiving. Policies to assist families and interventions, such as respite service, care capacity building, official leave for caregiving, etc., may reduce the burden of families struggling with informal care chores. Furthermore, caregiver burden measurements can be applied as a screening tool to assess long-term care needs, complementing the dependency assessment. Finally, implementation research is required to determine the effectiveness of respite care services for older people in Thailand. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthy Ageing Commuities)
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