Special Issue "Health Impact and Control of Food Insecurity"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Public Health Statistics and Risk Assessment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jigna M. Dharod
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC 27402-6170, USA
Interests: food insecurity and racial/ethnic disparities; association between water access and food insecurity; impact of food insecurity during the critical periods of development (first 1000 days)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food insecurity is a major public health issue worldwide. Furthermore, the COVID-19 pandemic has increased food insecurity and has negatively affected people’s ability to have consistent access to safe and nutritious food.

Food insecurity, involving four basic aspects of availability, access, utilization, and stability, is associated with malnutrition. Triple burden of malnutrition (underweight, vitamin/mineral deficiencies, overweight/obesity) is occurring worldwide, and food insecurity has played a significant role in creating this imbalance.  Food insecurity is also associated with poor mental, emotional, and psychosocial health among adults and children through different pathways. Food insecurity has been identified as a major source of social unrest and dispute. Addressing food insecurity is key and requires multiprong approaches from local to global levels to protect the environment, promote local sustainable food systems, and improve the livelihoods of vulnerable populations.

This Special Issue is open to any subject area linked to food insecurity and health. We are interested in both qualitative and quantitative studies, providing linkages between food insecurity and health. We are also interested in studies examining the effect of COVID-19 on access, consistency, and availability aspects of food insecurity. Studies featuring associations between water access, agriculture, and food insecurity are also welcomed.

Dr. Jigna M. Dharod
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food insecurity
  • malnutrition
  • food availability
  • nutrient utilization
  • water access
  • agriculture
  • environment
  • household food access
  • pandemic
  • hunger

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Factors That Determine the Dietary Diversity Score in Rural Households: The Case of the Paute River Basin of Azuay Province, Ecuador
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 2059; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18042059 - 20 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1005
Abstract
Inadequate food and nutrition affect human well-being, particularly for many poor subpopulations living in rural areas. The purpose of this research was to analyze the factors that determine the Household Dietary Diversity Score (HDDS) in the rural area of the Paute River Basin, [...] Read more.
Inadequate food and nutrition affect human well-being, particularly for many poor subpopulations living in rural areas. The purpose of this research was to analyze the factors that determine the Household Dietary Diversity Score (HDDS) in the rural area of the Paute River Basin, Azuay Province, Ecuador. The sample size of 383 surveys was determined by a stratified random sampling method with proportional affixation. Dietary diversity was measured through the HDDS, with 12 food groups (cereals; roots and tubers; fruits; sugar/honey; meat and eggs; legumes or grains; vegetables; oils/fats; milk and dairy products; meats; miscellaneous; fish and shellfish) over a recall period of 7 days. A Poisson regression model was used to determine the relationship between the HDDS and sociodemographic variables. The results show that the average HDDS of food consumption is 10.89 foods. Of the analyzed food groups, the most consumed are cereals; roots and tubers; fruits; sugar/honey. In addition, the determinants that best explain the HDDS in the predictive model were housing size, household size, per capita food expenditure, area of cultivated land, level of education, and marital status of the head of household. The tools used in this research can be used to analyze food and nutrition security interventions. Furthermore, the results allow policymakers to identify applicable public policies in the fight against hunger. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Impact and Control of Food Insecurity)
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Article
Association of Food Insecurity with Nutrient Intake and Depression among Korean and US Adults: Data from the 2014 Korea and the 2013–2014 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 506; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18020506 - 09 Jan 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1039
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to understand the current status of food insecurity in Korea and the US and to compare the relationship of food insecurity with nutrient intake and depression. Data from the 2014 Korea and the 2013–2014 US National Health [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study is to understand the current status of food insecurity in Korea and the US and to compare the relationship of food insecurity with nutrient intake and depression. Data from the 2014 Korea and the 2013–2014 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were analyzed, and a total of 3102 Korean and 3234 American adults aged 20–64 years were included. Study subjects were classified into three groups according to degree of food insecurity assessed by the 18-item Household Food Security Survey Module: food secure (FS), mildly food insecure (FI 1), and moderately-to-severely food insecure (FI 2) groups. Energy and nutrient intake were assessed using a 24-h dietary recall. Depression was measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) screener. The prevalence of food insecurity was 17.2% in Korea and 26.4% in the US. In both countries, the people in the FI 2 group had lower incomes and education levels and were mostly single. Energy and nutrient intake differed by food insecurity status. In both Korea and the US, adults with moderate-to-severe food insecurity (FI 2) consumed fewer proteins, fiber, potassium, and vitamin C. Additionally, the FI 2 groups had higher proportions of people not meeting the Dietary Reference Intake for protein, potassium, niacin, and vitamin C than the FS groups in Korea and the US. FI 2 people were three times more likely to be depressed than FS group; this difference was stronger in Korea than the US. We found that the prevalence of food insecurity was higher in the US than in Korea, and food insecurity was associated with reduced nutrient intake and increased odds of depression in both Korean and US adults. Therefore, food insecurity is an important public health issue at both the individual and national levels. Continuous monitoring and new intervention activities to promote food security are needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Impact and Control of Food Insecurity)
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