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Special Issue "Health, Safety and Well-being at Work- Building Healthy Workplaces"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Krassi Rumchev
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Public Health, Curtin University, Bentley WA 6009, Australia
Interests: indoor air pollution; children’s health; ultrafine particles; risk assessment; health impact assessment
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Jeffery Spickett
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Emeritus Professor, School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6845, Australia
Interests: health impact assessment; health risk assessment; environmental health; occupational health
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The workforce represents half the world’s population and is the major contributor to economic and social development. The average person spends more time working than any other daily activity and, therefore, the workplace is an important setting not only to prevent occupational injury and disease but also to improve the overall health and well-being of all workers.

According to the World Health Organisation, “A healthy workplace is one in which workers and managers collaborate to use a continual improvement process to protect and promote the health, safety, and well-being of all workers.”

Despite new effective occupational health and safety programs and structural changes introduced to workplaces, hazardous agents, and factors such as physical, chemical, biological, ergonomic, and psychosocial stress, in addition to occupational accidents, still threaten the health of workers and continue to cause work-related diseases and injuries throughout the world.

Creating a healthy workplace that does no harm to the health, safety or well-being of workers is a moral imperative and it is not a new concept. However, it has evolved from primarily focusing on managing occupational hazards to include considerations related to work organisation, workplace culture, and lifestyle.

Health and safety problems at work are, in principle, preventable and can be avoided by applying various tools including legislative, technical, research, training, and education.

This Special Issue showcase the variety and relevance of recent advances and developments in the field of occupational safety and health.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following: environmental and occupational risks in workplaces; environmental and occupational monitoring; health and safety practices; education and training; safety culture; work organisation and workers’ well-being.

Prof. Krassi Rumchev
Prof. Jeffery Spickett
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • workplace
  • health and safety
  • occupational hazards
  • health and safety practices

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
The Quality of Life, Psychological Health, and Occupational Calling of Korean Workers: Differences by the New Classes of Occupation Emerging Amid the COVID-19 Pandemic
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(16), 5689; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17165689 - 06 Aug 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1401
Abstract
This study aimed to create new classifications for occupations that have emerged from the COVID-19 pandemic in Korea, based on Reich’s classifications for the United States. We examined Korean workers’ occupational calling, psychological health, and quality of life. An online questionnaire was administered [...] Read more.
This study aimed to create new classifications for occupations that have emerged from the COVID-19 pandemic in Korea, based on Reich’s classifications for the United States. We examined Korean workers’ occupational calling, psychological health, and quality of life. An online questionnaire was administered and data from 1029 Korean workers were analyzed. The questionnaire comprised the Korean version of the Multidimensional Calling Measure to assess occupational calling, the Psychosocial Well-being Index-short form for psychological health, and the Control, Autonomy, Self-realization, and Pleasure (CASP-19) scale for quality of life. We created a Korean-adapted version of the classes of occupation based on those created by the COVID-19 situation in the USA. Our results showed that Korean workers had a high perceived calling to work, and different classes showed different levels of quality of life and psychological health. We need a health concentration management system for essential groups or personal safety protection equipment should be provided. Education on infection control should be offered and effective medical system processes should be in place. We need to develop technology to respond to medical needs online, remotely, or telephonically. The government should implement policies to ensure job security and to improve wages and welfare. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health, Safety and Well-being at Work- Building Healthy Workplaces)
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Article
Can the Psychosocial Safety Climate Reduce Ill-Health Presenteeism? Evidence from Chinese Healthcare Staff under a Dual Information Processing Path Lens
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2969; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17082969 - 24 Apr 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1366
Abstract
Because of heavy workloads, non-transferable responsibilities, and shift systems, healthcare staff are prone to ill-health presenteeism. Based on social information processing theory, this study explored the influence of the psychosocial safety climate (PSC) on ill-health presenteeism. The mediating effects of perceived instrumental support [...] Read more.
Because of heavy workloads, non-transferable responsibilities, and shift systems, healthcare staff are prone to ill-health presenteeism. Based on social information processing theory, this study explored the influence of the psychosocial safety climate (PSC) on ill-health presenteeism. The mediating effects of perceived instrumental support and perceived emotional support and the moderating effect of organic structure in this process were observed. Using a time-lagged research design, data from 386 healthcare staff were gathered and multiple regression and bootstrapping were used to test each hypothesis. The results showed that: (1) PSC negatively relates to ill-health presenteeism. (2) Both perceived instrumental support and perceived emotional support mediate the relationship between PSC and ill-health presenteeism. The affective information processing path is more effective than the cognitive information processing path, but they do not convey a positive interaction effect on ill-health presenteeism. (3) The organic structure moderates the mediating effect of perceived emotional support but does not exert a significant moderating effect on the mediating process of perceived instrumental support. This study particularly identified PSC as a contextual antecedent of ill-health presenteeism. By combining organizational, work-related, and person-related factors, a more comprehensive theoretical framework for the understanding of ill-health presenteeism is developed, thus informing health promotion management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health, Safety and Well-being at Work- Building Healthy Workplaces)
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Article
Agricultural Dust Exposures and Health and Safety Practices among Western Australian Wheatbelt Farmers during Harvest
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(24), 5009; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16245009 - 09 Dec 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1075
Abstract
Background: Agricultural farmworkers are routinely exposed to high levels of airborne dust particles that have been linked to adverse health outcomes. Methods: This study measured personal and environmental exposures to dust particulates by farmworkers during harvesting activities. Farmers completed a workplace survey with [...] Read more.
Background: Agricultural farmworkers are routinely exposed to high levels of airborne dust particles that have been linked to adverse health outcomes. Methods: This study measured personal and environmental exposures to dust particulates by farmworkers during harvesting activities. Farmers completed a workplace survey with regards to their health and safety awareness and practices and researchers observed general farm safety practices on selected farms using a checklist. Results: In this study, farmers were noted to commonly work extended hours and shifts during harvest due to rigid timing deadlines. Results showed that 40% of farmers were exposed to concentrations of inhalable particles greater than SafeWork Australia’s workplace exposure standards for grain dusts, assuming a 16 h working day over 5 shifts. Twenty-two percent were exposed to concentrations that were above the adjusted standard for 12 h shifts. Survey results showed that three-quarters of farm owners provided new workers with some type of induction related to farm safety, however this was mostly undertaken in an arbitrary manner. Despite noting that farming was a dusty occupation and reporting to use protective measures to reduce harmful dust exposures, no workers were observed to wear respiratory protection when working outside of the protection of a vehicle cabin. Conclusion: This study identified substantial gaps in health and safety knowledge among farm managers and workers, and improved education and training are highly recommended. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health, Safety and Well-being at Work- Building Healthy Workplaces)
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