Special Issue "Health Care of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Public Health Statistics and Risk Assessment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Martine Hamann
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Neuroscience, Psychology and Behaviour, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 9HN, UK
Interests: hearing loss; tinnitus; neurological disorders; biomarkers; animal model; plasticity; neurosciences

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

WHO estimates that 360 million people (5.3% of the world’s population) are living with disabling hearing loss, while around 15% of the world’s adult population have some degree of hearing loss. Hearing loss caused by exposure to recreational and occupational noise is the second most common form of hearing loss after presbycusis (age-related hearing loss). Noise-induced hearing loss can also be due to unsafe exposure to residential, social or military service-related noise. The aim of this Special Issue is to provide a forum for papers concerned with the prevention, screening, and treatment of noise-induced hearing loss. Disabling hearing loss is unequally distributed across the world, and papers dealing with comparative aspects of hearing prevention, assessments, and treatments throughout the world will also be considered. Methodological and clinical papers will be considered when they contribute to the understanding of aspects related to noise-induced hearing loss as described above.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Martine Hamann
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Hearing loss
  • Deafness
  • Noise exposure
  • Occupational noise
  • Recreational noise
  • Cochlear implants
  • Permanent hearing loss
  • Temporary hearing loss
  • Hearing prevention
  • Audiogram
  • Auditory brainstem response recording

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
High-Frequency Audiometry in Women with and without Exposure to Workplace Noise
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6463; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18126463 - 15 Jun 2021
Viewed by 405
Abstract
For this study, high-frequency audiometry was used to compare the hearing thresholds, with respect to age, among women exposed to noise in their working environment, as well as those not exposed to such noise. The cohort comprised 243 women (average age 36.2 years), [...] Read more.
For this study, high-frequency audiometry was used to compare the hearing thresholds, with respect to age, among women exposed to noise in their working environment, as well as those not exposed to such noise. The cohort comprised 243 women (average age 36.2 years), of which 88 women were employed in a noisy (LAeq,8h 85–105 dB) workplace, while 155 women did not experience noise. Age categories were determined according to the World Health Organization (Geneva, Switzerland). Hearing thresholds were measured at frequencies of 0.125–16 kHz. Higher hearing thresholds were found in the youngest age groups (18–29 and 30–44 years) among those exposed to noise, as compared to those who were not. The difference in hearing thresholds between the exposed and unexposed groups increased with age, as well as with the frequencies. The highest difference in hearing thresholds for these age categories was measured at 11.25 kHz. The oldest age group (45–63 years) exposed to noise showed lower hearing thresholds than the unexposed group at all frequencies from 4 kHz to 16 kHz. High-frequency audiometry can be used for the early detection of increased hearing thresholds at high frequencies. High-frequency audiometry could be included in preventive programs, especially for younger people exposed to noise, in order to enable earlier detection of noise-induced hearing loss. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Care of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss)
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Article
Individual Fit Testing of Hearing-Protection Devices Based on Microphones in Real Ears among Workers in Industries with High-Noise-Level Manufacturing
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(9), 3242; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17093242 - 06 May 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1027
Abstract
Hearing-protection devices (HPDs) are particularly important in protecting the hearing of workers. The aim of this study was to prevent hearing damage in workplaces in Taiwan. It was conducted to determine the actual sound attenuation of the personal attenuation rating (PAR) values when [...] Read more.
Hearing-protection devices (HPDs) are particularly important in protecting the hearing of workers. The aim of this study was to prevent hearing damage in workplaces in Taiwan. It was conducted to determine the actual sound attenuation of the personal attenuation rating (PAR) values when wearing HPDs via measurements from field microphones in workers’ real ears (F-MIRE). Across 105 measurement trials for the Classic™ roll-down foam earplug HPDs worn by the workers, there were 23 cases of ineffective protection (including caution and fail); the proportion was 20% (including the first measurement and re-wear of HPDs after education and training). In addition, re-education and training in how to wear the HPDs was provided, improving wearing skills. A total of 29 testees wearing the Classic™ roll-down foam earplug HPDs failed to meet the pass standard for the first PAR test, and 6 of them improved and subsequently passed the PAR test. The improvement rate was 20%. These 23 testees switched to another HPD, namely Kneading-Free Push-Ins™ earplugs. From this group, 16 effective sound attenuation values were obtained, with an improvement rate of 70%. However, seven testees failed to pass the PAR test, and after education, training, and replacement of HPDs with different types, they still could not pass the PAR test. At that time, even if the UltraFit™ pre-molded earplugs were adopted again for wear and replacement, they were still unable to pass the PAR test. This HPD was eventually replaced with the PELTOR X4A Earmuff HPD and then tested again, with these HPDs finally passing the PAR test. In Taiwan, the use of fit testing has been increasing but it is not a common practice, and few studies on hearing-protection fit testing have been conducted in this country. The goal of this study was to gain more insight into the current hearing protection situation, including field attenuation of HPDs obtained by workers, the effects of training on improving the attenuation of HPDs after F-MIRE measurements, and the awareness of hearing health and motivation on the use of HPDs in a high-noise-level environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Care of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss)
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Review

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Review
High-Frequency Audiometry for Early Detection of Hearing Loss: A Narrative Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4702; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18094702 - 28 Apr 2021
Viewed by 524
Abstract
The WHO considers hearing loss to be a major global problem. A literature search was conducted to see whether high-frequency audiometry (HFA) could be used for the early detection of hearing loss. A further aim was to see whether any differences exist in [...] Read more.
The WHO considers hearing loss to be a major global problem. A literature search was conducted to see whether high-frequency audiometry (HFA) could be used for the early detection of hearing loss. A further aim was to see whether any differences exist in the hearing threshold using conventional audiometry (CA) and HFA in workers of different age groups exposed to workplace noise. Our search of electronic databases yielded a total of 5938 scientific papers. The inclusion criteria were the keywords “high frequency” and “audiometry” appearing anywhere in the article and the participation of unexposed people or a group exposed to workplace noise. Fifteen studies met these conditions; the sample size varied (51–645 people), and the age range of the people studied was 5–90 years. Commercial high-frequency audiometers and high-frequency headphones were used. In populations unexposed to workplace noise, significantly higher thresholds of 14–16 kHz were found. In populations with exposure to workplace noise, significantly higher statistical thresholds were found for the exposed group (EG) compared with the control group (CG) at frequencies of 9–18 kHz, especially at 16 kHz. The studies also showed higher hearing thresholds of 10–16 kHz in respondents aged under 31 years following the use of personal listening devices (PLDs) for longer than 5 years. The effect of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) first became apparent for HFA rather than CA. However, normative data have not yet been collected. Therefore, it is necessary to establish a uniform evaluation protocol accounting for age, sex, comorbidities and exposures, as well as for younger respondents using PLDs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Care of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss)
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