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Special Issue "Implementation of Interventions in Public Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 December 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Antonio Sarria-Santamera
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Spain
Interests: public health; chronic diseases; health promotion; diseases prevention; implementation research; healthcare system; health technology assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The aging of the population together with progress in knowledge and technology have fostered the development of an advanced society, which procures a longer life to citizens but at the same time is fostering the acquisition of some human behaviors (consumption of processed and high caloric food, pollution, sedentarism, use of personal technological devices and cars) that may increase the incidence of many diseases, in particular, noncommunicable ones.

The implementation of cost-effective interventions on health prevention and disease promotion is one important measure that may improve public health and citizen wellbeing and decrease health and social care costs, as well as the impact of diseases in the workforce and global economy.

For this Special Issue on “Implementation of interventions in public health”, we invite you to submit articles related to evidence of successful implementation frameworks, or innovative interventions in public health carried out at different scales and in different settings (such as education, social, labor, and health systems) that may increase the sustainability of health and social care systems and the wellbeing of citizens.

Dr. Antonio Sarria-Santamera
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • public health
  • chronic diseases
  • health promotion
  • disease prevention
  • implementation research
  • cross-country collaboration

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Lessons from the Implementation of Pilot Practices to Tackle the Burden of Noncommunicable Diseases in Europe
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(13), 4661; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17134661 - 29 Jun 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 698
Abstract
(1) Background: The gap between research findings and their application in routine practice implies that patients and populations are not benefiting from the investment in scientific research. The objective of this work is to describe the process and main lessons obtained from the [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The gap between research findings and their application in routine practice implies that patients and populations are not benefiting from the investment in scientific research. The objective of this work is to describe the process and main lessons obtained from the pilot practices and recommendation that have been implemented by CHRODIS-PLUS partner organizations; (2) Methods: CHRODIS-PLUS is a Joint Action funded by the European Union Health Programme that continues the work of Joint Action CHRODIS-JA. CHRODIS-PLUS has developed an Implementation Strategy that is being tested to implement innovative practices and recommendations in four main areas of action: health promotion and disease prevention, multimorbidity, fostering quality of care of patients with chronic diseases, and employment and chronic conditions; (3) Results: The Three-Stages CHRODIS-PLUS Implementation Strategy, based on a Local Implementation Working Group, has demonstrated that it can be applied for interventions and in situations and contexts of great diversity, reflecting both its validity and generalizability; (4) Conclusions: Implementation has to recognize the social dynamics associated with implementation, ensuring sympathy toward the culture and values that underpin these processes, which is a key differentiation from more linear improvement approaches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Implementation of Interventions in Public Health)

Research

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Article
Health Promotion Interventions: Lessons from the Transfer of Good Practices in CHRODIS-PLUS
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1281; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17041281 - 17 Feb 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1160
Abstract
Health promotion and disease prevention often take the form of population- and individual-based interventions that aim to reduce the burden of disease and associated risk factors. There is a wealth of programs, policies, and procedures that have been proven to work in a [...] Read more.
Health promotion and disease prevention often take the form of population- and individual-based interventions that aim to reduce the burden of disease and associated risk factors. There is a wealth of programs, policies, and procedures that have been proven to work in a specific context with potential to improve the lives and quality of life for many people. However, the challenge facing health promotion is how to transfer recognized good practices from one context to another. We present findings from the use of the implementation framework developed in the Joint Action project CHRODIS-PLUS to support the transfer of health promotion interventions for children’s health and older adults identified previously as good practices. We explore the contextual success factors and barriers in the use of an implementation framework in local contexts and the protocol for supporting the implementation. The paper concludes by discussing the key learning points and the development of the next steps for successful transfer of health promotion interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Implementation of Interventions in Public Health)
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Article
Fostering the Quality of Care for People with Chronic Diseases, from Theory to Practice: The Development of Good Practices in Disease Prevention and Care in JA CHRODIS PLUS Using JA CHRODIS Recommendations and Quality Criteria
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(3), 951; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17030951 - 04 Feb 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 822
Abstract
In the frame of joint action in chronic diseases (JA CHRODIS), an extensive process at the European Union level was carried out to identify a core set of quality criteria and to formulate recommendations that improved prevention, early detection, and quality of care [...] Read more.
In the frame of joint action in chronic diseases (JA CHRODIS), an extensive process at the European Union level was carried out to identify a core set of quality criteria and to formulate recommendations that improved prevention, early detection, and quality of care for people with chronic diseases. Diabetes was used as a model disease. The core set of quality criteria may be applied to develop and improve practices, programs, strategies, and policies in various domains (e.g., prevention, care, health promotion, education, and training). The quality criteria are general enough to be applied in countries with different political, administrative, social, and health care organizations. Moreover, they can be applied to a number of other chronic diseases. JA CHRODIS recommendations and quality criteria are being tested in a series of pilot actions within the JA CHRODIS PLUS. A total of 15 partners representing nine European countries worked together to implement pilot actions and generate practical lessons that could contribute to the further uptake and use of JA CHRODIS recommendations. Special emphasis is given to meaningful patient involvement in co-designing the pilot actions and to the sustainability and scalability of the pilot actions. These insights were found to be at the core of the learning from pilot actions to foster high quality care for people with chronic diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Implementation of Interventions in Public Health)
Article
Employment and Chronic Diseases: Suggested Actions for The Implementation of Inclusive Policies for The Participation of People with Chronic Diseases in the Labour Market
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(3), 820; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17030820 - 28 Jan 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1649
Abstract
In recent decades, the number of people living with one or more chronic diseases has increased dramatically, affecting all sectors of society, particularly the labour market. Such an increase of people with chronic diseases combined with the aging of working population affects income [...] Read more.
In recent decades, the number of people living with one or more chronic diseases has increased dramatically, affecting all sectors of society, particularly the labour market. Such an increase of people with chronic diseases combined with the aging of working population affects income levels and job opportunities, careers, social inclusion and working conditions. Both legislation and company regulations should take into account the difficulties that workers experiencing chronic diseases may face in order to be able to formulate innovative and person-centred responses to effectively manage this workforce while simultaneously ensuring employee wellbeing and continued employer productivity. The European Joint Action “CHRODIS PLUS: Implementing good practices for Chronic Diseases” supports European Union Member States in the implementation of new and innovative policies and practices for health promotion, diseases prevention and for promoting participation of people with chronic diseases in labour market. Therefore, a Toolbox for employment and chronic conditions has been developed and its aim is to improve work access and participation of people with chronic diseases and to support employers in implementing health promotion and chronic disease prevention activities in the workplace. The Toolbox consists of two independent instruments: the Training tool for managers and the Toolkit for workplaces that have been tested in different medium and large companies and working sectors in several European countries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Implementation of Interventions in Public Health)
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Article
Application of the JA-CHRODIS Integrated Multimorbidity Care Model (IMCM) to a Case Study of Diabetes and Mental Health
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(24), 5151; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16245151 - 17 Dec 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1759
Abstract
The Integrated Multimorbidity Care Model (IMCM), developed by the Joint Action on Chronic Diseases and Promoting Healthy Ageing across the Life Cycle (JA-CHRODIS), proposes a set of 16 multidimensional components (i.e., recommendations) to improve the care of persons with multimorbidity in Europe. This [...] Read more.
The Integrated Multimorbidity Care Model (IMCM), developed by the Joint Action on Chronic Diseases and Promoting Healthy Ageing across the Life Cycle (JA-CHRODIS), proposes a set of 16 multidimensional components (i.e., recommendations) to improve the care of persons with multimorbidity in Europe. This study aimed at analyzing the potential applicability of the IMCM. We followed a qualitative approach that comprised two phases: (1) The design of a case study based on empirical clinical data, which consisted of a hypothetical woman with multimorbidity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, mental health, and associated social problems, and (2) the creation of a consensus group to gather the opinions of a multidisciplinary group of experts and consider the potential applicability of the IMCM to our case study. Experts described how care should be delivered to this patient according to each model component, suggested the use of specific rating scales and tools to assess her needs in a comprehensive and regular way, and pointed our crucial health and social resources to improve her care process. Experts also highlighted patient-centered, integrated and tailored care as one of the keystones of quality healthcare. Our results suggest that the IMCM is applicable in complex patients with multimorbidity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Implementation of Interventions in Public Health)
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Article
A Methodological Approach for Implementing an Integrated Multimorbidity Care Model: Results from the Pre-Implementation Stage of Joint Action CHRODIS-PLUS
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(24), 5044; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16245044 - 11 Dec 2019
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 1666
Abstract
Patients with multimorbidity (defined as the co-occurrence of multiple chronic diseases) frequently experience fragmented care, which increases the risk of negative outcomes. A recently proposed Integrated Multimorbidity Care Model aims to overcome many issues related to fragmented care. In the context of Joint [...] Read more.
Patients with multimorbidity (defined as the co-occurrence of multiple chronic diseases) frequently experience fragmented care, which increases the risk of negative outcomes. A recently proposed Integrated Multimorbidity Care Model aims to overcome many issues related to fragmented care. In the context of Joint Action CHRODIS-PLUS, an implementation methodology was developed for the care model, which is being piloted in five sites. We aim to (1) explain the methodology used to implement the care model and (2) describe how the pilot sites have adapted and applied the proposed methodology. The model is being implemented in Spain (Andalusia and Aragon), Lithuania (Vilnius and Kaunas), and Italy (Rome). Local implementation working groups at each site adapted the model to local needs, goals, and resources using the same methodological steps: (1) Scope analysis; (2) situation analysis—“strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats” (SWOT) analysis; (3) development and improvement of implementation methodology; and (4) final development of an action plan. This common implementation strategy shows how care models can be adapted according to local and regional specificities. Analysis of the common key outcome indicators at the post-implementation phase will help to demonstrate the clinical effectiveness, as well as highlight any difficulties in adapting a common Integrated Multimorbidity Care Model in different countries and clinical settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Implementation of Interventions in Public Health)
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Review

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Review
Keeping People with Dementia or Mild Cognitive Impairment in Employment: A Literature Review on Its Determinants
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(3), 842; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17030842 - 29 Jan 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1385
Abstract
Background: Approximately 10–20% of people with early onset dementias (EOD) or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are aged under 65 and, due to extended working life and increasing prevalence of dementias, they more and more frequently will be present in the active workforce. This [...] Read more.
Background: Approximately 10–20% of people with early onset dementias (EOD) or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are aged under 65 and, due to extended working life and increasing prevalence of dementias, they more and more frequently will be present in the active workforce. This review aimed to synthesize the available information about the ability of people with EOD or MCI to retain their participation in the labor workforce. Methods: We searched SCOPUS and EMBASE for peer-reviewed papers that reported studies assessing work ability in employees with EOD or MCI that were published in the period of January 2010 to August 2019. Results: We selected four publications, in which 1012 participants with EOD or MCI were enrolled (41.2% males). Cognitive difficulties rather than motor dysfunction were found to reduce patients’ ability to work. Two main themes emerged: management of dementia in the workplace and the impact of symptoms on working status. Conclusions: EOD and MCI impact on workforce participation by determining problems in executive functions. Although this review was based on a small sample of studies, it can be shown that support in the workplace may act as a facilitator to enhance workforce participation, and occupational health professionals can help patients with EOD or MCI continue working as much as possible. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Implementation of Interventions in Public Health)
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