Special Issue "Non-Communicable Diseases and Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors in Low- and Middle-Income Countries"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Tracy Kolbe-Alexander
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Health and Wellbeing, University of Southern Queensland, West St, Darling Heights QLD 4350, Аustralia
Dr. Gregore Iven Mielke
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia QLD 4067, Australia

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Although 85% of premature deaths caused by non-communicable diseases (NCDs) occur in low-middle income countries, most of the current knowledge about lifestyle behaviors and prevention of NCDs is still generated in studies conducted in high-income countries. Improving understanding of the role of healthy lifestyle behaviors (physical activity, sedentary behavior, sleep and diet) in the prevention and treatment of NCDs in LMIC is urged, albeit challenging. In LMIC, infectious diseases and injuries still account for much of the health burden, and lifestyle behavior research may not be a priority. Additionally, some LMICs are constantly threatened by humanitarian crises, economic and sociopolitical instability, with a substantial proportion of the population facing underemployment and informal housing, important macro determinants of behaviors.

Authors are invited to submit systematic reviews/meta-analyses and original studies including novel and innovative research that focus on surveillance, determinants, health consequences and interventions addressing healthy lifestyle behaviors (including physical activity, sedentary behavior, sleep and diet) to reduce the risk of non-communicable diseases and improve wellbeing in low- and middle-income countries.

Dr. Tracy Kolbe-Alexander
Dr. Gregore Iven Mielke
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • non-communicable disease
  • low-middle-income countries
  • physical activity
  • sedentary behaviour
  • diet
  • sleep

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Gender-Specific Prevalence of Risk Factors for Non-Communicable Diseases by Health Service Use among Schoolteachers in Afghanistan
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5729; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115729 - 26 May 2021
Viewed by 1056
Abstract
Objectives of this study were: (1) to examine gender differences in biomedical indicators, lifestyle behaviors, self-health check practices, receipt of professional non-communicable disease (NCD)-related lifestyle advice, and the use of health services among teachers in Afghanistan; and (2) to seek the patterns of [...] Read more.
Objectives of this study were: (1) to examine gender differences in biomedical indicators, lifestyle behaviors, self-health check practices, receipt of professional non-communicable disease (NCD)-related lifestyle advice, and the use of health services among teachers in Afghanistan; and (2) to seek the patterns of these indicators among users and non-users of health services among both male and female teachers. This cross-sectional study was carried out among 600 schoolteachers in Kabul city in February 2017. Gender differences in percentage distributions of abnormal biomedical indicators, lifestyle behaviors, self-health check practices, and receipt of professional lifestyle advice were examined. These patterns were further analyzed according to the use of health services in the previous 12 months by both genders. The results showed that male teachers had a higher prevalence of hypertension, increased serum triglycerides, physically active lifestyle, and tobacco use than female teachers (28.2/20.4, p = 0.038; 47.0/37.9, p = 0.040; 54.3/40.9, p = 0.002; 15.8/0.7, p < 0.001, respectively); female teachers had a higher prevalence of increased serum LDL cholesterol, overweight/obesity, and frequent consumption of fruits/vegetables than male teachers (61.3/50.8, p = 0.018; 64.7/43.5, p < 0.001; 71.4/53.8, p < 0.001, respectively). Female teachers were more likely to receive professional lifestyle advice related to NCDs than male teachers. Although users of health services practiced self-health checks and received professional lifestyle advice more frequently than non-users, abnormal biomedical indicators were similarly shown among users and non-users of health services in both genders. In conclusion, high prevalence of abnormal biomedical indicators was indicated in both male and female teachers, although the specific abnormal biomedical indicators differed by gender. Users and non-users of health services presented a similar prevalence of these abnormal indicators. Understanding the differences in patterns of NCD risk factors is essential when developing gender-informed policies. Full article
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