Special Issue "Advances in Human Anatomy: Research Development and Innovative Medical Training"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Stefano Ratti
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, Alma Mater Studiorum Università di Bologna, 40138 Bologna, Italy
Interests: human anatomy; anatomical technologies; cellular signaling; molecular biology; cancer and rare diseases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Human anatomy is fundamental for medical education. The rise of new mini-invasive techniques, technological devices and digital technologies requires a constant and advanced study of the human body in order to obtain precise and effective results. Indeed, the training on the cadaver is essential to guarantee basic and specialized medical training for different categories of health professionals and to test and develop new medical technologies and techniques. The importance of gross anatomy studies is translational between different medical fields and it combines the most innovative technologies (augmented reality, new surgical mini-invasive techniques, 3D printed scaffold, morphology, functional morphology, robotic devices, tissue engineering, cellular and molecular approaches, molecular anthropology and many others) with gross anatomy and basic sciences. Certainly, the possibility of gross anatomy studies is directly related to the generosity of the donators that decide to adhere to a body donation program.

Moreover, the study of the potentialities of human anatomy is not only related to the development of new techniques, but also to the upgrade of the teaching and learning models that combine an old technique, such as the cadaveric dissection, with the new methods of education (tutor-based medical teaching, graphic medicine, online teaching, manual and procedural skill-based learning). The spectrum of human anatomy is truly very broad, as it involves students from the first years of Medical Schools (Medicine and Surgery, Physiotherapy, Motor and Sport Sciences, Dentistry, Pharmacology and many others) to experienced physicians and many different health professionals.

Therefore, research development and medical training are strictly related and interconnected with human anatomy and body donation programs, guaranteeing medical improvement and advances with translational and innovative approaches.

Papers addressing these topics are invited for this Special Issue, especially those combining a high academic standard, coupled with a practical focus on the potentiality of human anatomy in research development and medical training.

Dr. Stefano Ratti
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • human anatomy
  • cadaver dissection
  • surgical technologies
  • medical training
  • teaching innovations
  • body donation program
  • molecular anthropology
  • sports and anatomy
  • morphology and functional morphology
  • history of medicine

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Flaminio Rota: Fame and Glory of a 16th Century Anatomist without Scientific Publications
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8772; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18168772 - 19 Aug 2021
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Abstract
Academic activity is intrinsically composed of two aspects: teaching and research. Since the 20th century, the aphorism “publish or perish” has overwhelmingly established itself in the academic field. Research activity has absorbed more attention from the professors who have neglected teaching activity. In [...] Read more.
Academic activity is intrinsically composed of two aspects: teaching and research. Since the 20th century, the aphorism “publish or perish” has overwhelmingly established itself in the academic field. Research activity has absorbed more attention from the professors who have neglected teaching activity. In anatomical sciences, research has focused mainly on ultrastructural anatomy and biochemical aspects, far removed from the topics addressed to medical students. Will today’s anatomists be rewarded by their choice? To generate a forecast, we should entrust what history has already taught us. For this analysis, an example was taken, concerning the fate that history reserved for the anatomy teachers of the University of Bologna in the second half of the 16th century. Thanks to Vesalius (1514–1564), experimentation on the human body replaced the old dogmatic knowledge, and didactic innovation was one with research. Some figures were highly praised despite their poor scientific production. The present article focuses on the figure of Flaminio Rota, who was highly esteemed by his colleagues in spite of no significant scientific activity. Reasons for this paradox are examined. Then, history also whispers to us: publish, but without perishing in the oblivion of students. Full article
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Brief Report
Is Dry Needling of the Supinator a Safe Procedure? A Potential Treatment for Lateral Epicondylalgia or Radial Tunnel Syndrome. A Cadaveric Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9162; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18179162 - 31 Aug 2021
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Abstract
The supinator muscle is involved in two pain conditions of the forearm and wrist: lateral epicondylalgia and radial tunnel syndrome. Its close anatomical relationship with the radial nerve at the arcade of Frohse encourages research on dry needling approaches. Our aim was to [...] Read more.
The supinator muscle is involved in two pain conditions of the forearm and wrist: lateral epicondylalgia and radial tunnel syndrome. Its close anatomical relationship with the radial nerve at the arcade of Frohse encourages research on dry needling approaches. Our aim was to determine if a solid filiform needle safely penetrates the supinator muscle during the clinical application of dry needling. Needle insertion of the supinator muscle was conducted in ten cryopreserved forearm specimens with a 30 × 0.32 mm filiform needle. With the forearm pronated, the needle was inserted perpendicular into the skin at the dorsal aspect of the forearm at a point located 4cm distal to the lateral epicondyle. The needle was advanced to a depth judged to be in the supinator muscle. Safety was assessed by measuring the distance from the needle to the surrounding neurovascular bundles of the radial nerve. Accurate needle penetration of the supinator muscle was observed in 100% of the forearms (needle penetration:16.4 ± 2.7 mm 95% CI 14.5 mm to 18.3 mm). No neurovascular bundle of the radial nerve was pierced in any of the specimen’s forearms. The distances from the tip of the needle were 7.8 ± 2.9 mm (95% CI 5.7 mm to 9.8 mm) to the deep branch of the radial nerve and 8.6 ± 4.3 mm (95% CI 5.5 mm to 11.7 mm) to the superficial branch of the radial nerve. The results from this cadaveric study support the assumption that needling of the supinator muscle can be accurately and safely conducted by an experienced clinician. Full article
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