Special Issue "Nutraceutical and Adaptogen Supplementation in Exercise and Stressful Environments"

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Christopher Ballmann
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Health Professions, Samford University, Birmingham, AL 35229, USA
Interests: exercise physiology; ergogenic aids; Cardiovascular disease; muscular dystrophy; exercise and extreme environment
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Tyler Williams
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Health Professions, Samford University, Birmingham, AL 35229, USA
Interests: exercise physiology; resistance exercise; training periodization; muscular fitness; ergogenic aid supplements

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue on how nutraceutical and adaptogen dietary supplementation mediates stress and exercise responses in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to https://0-www-mdpi-com.brum.beds.ac.uk/journal/ijerph.

Nutraceuticals and adaptogens are dietary molecules which may have the ability to improve health and/or increase an organism’s ability to counteract stress. These may be chronic or acute stress responses which can be manifested in physical exertion (i.e., exercise), psychological stress (i.e., mental fatigue), or environmental factors (i.e., altitude, heat). For some of these molecules, dietary enrichment has been used for centuries in folk medicine as homeopathic interventions to combat physical fatigue and promote wellbeing. However, many nutraceuticals and adaptogens have unsubstantiated health claims which necessitates further well designed and controlled research. In this Special Issue, we are seeking original investigations and reviews in nutraceuticals and adaptogen supplementation in the following contexts:

  • Exercise and physical stress
  • Altitude
  • Hot and humid environments
  • Psychological stress
  • Metabolic or oxidative stress
  • Fatigue
  • Cold exposure

Dr. Christopher Ballmann
Dr. Tyler Williams
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Exercise
  • Heat
  • Altitude
  • Nutrients
  • Supplements
  • Fatigue
  • Stress

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Effects of Acute Beta-Alanine Ingestion and Immersion-Plus-Exercise on Connectedness to Nature and Perceived Pain
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 8134; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18158134 - 31 Jul 2021
Viewed by 271
Abstract
This double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover study examined the effect of induced painful sensation (via acute Beta Alanine (B-ALA) ingestion) on Love and Care of Nature (LCN), heart rate (HR), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) during outdoor exercise. Twenty participants [...] Read more.
This double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover study examined the effect of induced painful sensation (via acute Beta Alanine (B-ALA) ingestion) on Love and Care of Nature (LCN), heart rate (HR), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) during outdoor exercise. Twenty participants volunteered on consecutive days to complete a 0.8 km (0.5 mi) up-hill hike after consuming either B-ALA (6.4 g) or placebo. Immediately after consumption participants answered LCN, RPE, and MPQ questionnaires, immersed in a natural environment for 45 min, and then completed a hike as quickly as possible without running. No difference in HR (p = 0.846), or RPE (p = 0.606) were observed between treatments. Total MPQ scores increased with consumption of B-ALA (p = 0.001). An increased LCN score was observed following exercise regardless of condition (p = 0.035). The results demonstrate that acute B-ALA supplementation is effective in increasing perceived pain sensations. The results also demonstrate an increase in LCN in the presence of increased perceptions of pain sensations during exercise. Full article
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Article
Effects of Short-Term Golden Root Extract (Rhodiola rosea) Supplementation on Resistance Exercise Performance
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 6953; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18136953 - 29 Jun 2021
Viewed by 624
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of short-term Golden Root Extract (GRE; Rhodiola rosea) supplementation on blood lactate, catecholamines, and performance during repeated bench press exercise. Resistance-trained males (n = 10) participated in this study. In a [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of short-term Golden Root Extract (GRE; Rhodiola rosea) supplementation on blood lactate, catecholamines, and performance during repeated bench press exercise. Resistance-trained males (n = 10) participated in this study. In a double-blinded, crossover, counterbalanced study design, participants supplemented with either 1500 mg/day of GRE or placebo (PL; gluten-free cornstarch) for 3 days prior to experimentation. An additional 500 mg dose was ingested 30 min prior to exercise testing. During each exercise trial, participants completed 2 repetitions of bench press at 75% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) as explosively as possible. A linear position transducer was used to measure mean concentric velocity. After 5 min of rest, participants completed 3 sets × repetitions to failure (RTF) at 75% 1RM separated by 2 min of rest between each set. A capillary blood sample was obtained pre- (PRE) and immediately post- (POST) exercise to measure blood concentrations lactate (LA), epinephrine (EPI), and norepinephrine (NE). Mean concentric velocity was significantly higher with GRE when compared to PL (p = 0.046). However, total RTF were significantly lower with GRE versus PL (p < 0.001). Regardless of treatment, LA was significantly higher Post versus Pre (p < 0.001), but GRE resulted in greater Post values compared to PL (p = 0.049). EPI and NE increased in both conditions Pre to Post (p < 0.001). However, Pre NE was significantly higher with GRE versus PL (p = 0.008). Findings indicate that short-term GRE supplementation increases mean bench press velocity but decreases bench press repetition volume. Furthermore, GRE resulted in higher NE levels and blood lactate following exercise. Thus, supplementing with GRE may enhance explosive resistance training performance but may also impair upper body strength-endurance. Full article
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