Special Issue "Nutrition as Prevention Factor for Diabetes, Obesity and Other Chronic Diseases"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Immacolata Cristina Nettore
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy
Interests: nutrition; obesity; flavor recognition; food preferences; dietary choice; childhood obesity; SNPs, polymorphism; public health
Dr. Raffaele Teperino
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Head of the Environmental Epigenetics Group, Institute of Experimental Genetics, Helmholtz Zentrum München GmbH, Neuherberg, Germany
Interests: gene/environment interaction; non-genetic inheritance; complex diseases; diabetes; obesity; cancer; epigenetics
Dr. Paolo Emidio Macchia
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University of Naples Federico II, 80131 Naples, Italy
Interests: nutrition and dietetics, flavor recognition; food preferences, endocrinology and internal medicine (general medicine)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the past decades, lifestyle changes such as an increase in sedentary behavior and easier access to low-priced, highly energy-dense foods have produced critical variations in body composition, resulting in higher obesity rates and diabetes. Nutrition describes the processes by which cells, tissues, organs, and the whole body acquire energy and nutrients for their normal structure and function. Since the early stages of life, a correct nutrition has a fundamental role to avoid the onset of pathologies. Indeed, childhood obesity is an important risk factor for the development of several health conditions in adults, including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), metabolic syndrome, and other non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), hypertension (HTN), hyperlipidemia, stroke, various cancers, sleep apnea, liver and gall bladder diseases, osteoarthritis, and gynecological problems. In addition, recent studies have focused on the psychosocial consequences of obesity, which appeared to be responsible for depression and/or prejudice. Thus, food choice combined with physical activity represents an important factor to prevent several diseases.

This Special Issue entitled “Nutrition as a prevention factor for Diabetes, Obesity, and other Chronic Diseases” will collect articles written by international researchers focusing on known and novel approaches to counter obesity and other diet-related chronic diseases. Original research papers, reviews, case reports, meta-analyses, and clinical studies addressing these topics are invited for this Special Issue.

Dr. Immacolata Cristina Nettore
Guest Editor
Dr. Raffaele Teperino
Prof. Paolo Emidio Macchia
Assistant Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nutrition
  • Food Choice
  • Childood Obesity, Diabetes
  • Chronic Disease
  • Non-communicable diseases
  • Prevention
  • Public health
  • Sedentary Life
  • Epigenetics
  • Gene/Environment Interaction

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Children Learn, Children Do! Results of the “Planning Health in School”, a Behavioural Change Programme
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(18), 9872; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18189872 - 19 Sep 2021
Viewed by 440
Abstract
The ‘Planning Health in School’ programme (PHS-pro) is a behavioural change intervention to assess and improve the eating habits of children, particularly the intake of fruit and vegetables, and to guide them towards healthy choices. The programme and its educational components are based [...] Read more.
The ‘Planning Health in School’ programme (PHS-pro) is a behavioural change intervention to assess and improve the eating habits of children, particularly the intake of fruit and vegetables, and to guide them towards healthy choices. The programme and its educational components are based on the Transtheoretical Model of stages of change to integrate nutritional literacy and build up problem-solving and decision-making skills. Children (n = 240, ages 10–12) of one large suburban school in Porto’s metropolitan area (Portugal) were evaluated throughout PHS-pro implementation during one school year in a repeated time–series design. Children’s outcome evaluations were conducted through seven 3-day food records for nine eating behaviour, documented after each learning module and through participatory activities which analysed attitudes, preferences and expectations. Changes were observed in children’s eating behaviour, supported by changes in motivation as perceived in their attitudes and expectations. Significant changes were found in a higher consumption of vegetable soup (p = 0.003), milk products (p = 0.024), and fruit (p = 0.008), while the consumption of high-energy dense food (p = 0.048) and soft drinks (p = 0.042) significantly decreased. No positive effects on fried food, water, vegetables and bread consumption were found. The PHS-pro intervention proved to be effective in developing healthy eating behaviour in young people. Full article
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Article
An Analysis of Maternal, Social and Household Factors Associated with Childhood Anemia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 3105; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18063105 - 17 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 929
Abstract
Anemia is highly prevalent in all strata of populations in India, with established evidence of intergenerational anemia. The state of Madhya Pradesh was selected to study childhood anemia as the population is mostly rural, with many tribal districts, and has the highest infant [...] Read more.
Anemia is highly prevalent in all strata of populations in India, with established evidence of intergenerational anemia. The state of Madhya Pradesh was selected to study childhood anemia as the population is mostly rural, with many tribal districts, and has the highest infant mortality rate in India. This study aims to understand the maternal, social and household factors that affect anemia among children aged 6 months to 5 years by analyzing the the National Family Health Survey (NFHS) conducted in 2015–2016. Children aged 6–59 months with estimated hemoglobin levels were included in this study. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were conducted to understand associations between childhood anemia and various socioeconomic factors. Two models to understand the presence of anemia and the levels of anemia were computed. Higher likelihood of having severe childhood anemia was observed among children of younger mothers (15- to 19-year-old mothers (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 4.06, less educated (uneducated mothers aOR 2.25, 95% CI 1.13, 4.48) and belonged to a scheduled tribe (aOR 1.88, 95% CI 1.07, 3.29). Strong associations between anemia in mothers and their children suggest intergenerational anemia which has long-term effects. Malnourished children (severe stunting aOR 3.19, 95% CI 2.36, 4.31) and children born with very low birth weight (aOR 4.28, 95% CI 2.67, 6.87) were more likely to have anemia. These findings strongly suggest more proactive interventions including prenatal healthcare for women and monitoring of the nutrition children at the community level to combat childhood anemia. Evaluations of existing programs should be conducted to understand the gaps in reducing anemia and malnutrition in children. Full article
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