Special Issue "One Year into the COVID-19 Crisis: Mental Health, Burnout, Trauma and Resilience"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Fabienne Glowacz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Psychology, Université de Liège, 4000 LiÅ ge, Belgium
2. ARCh Research Unit (Adaptation, Resilience and Change), 4000 Liège, Belgium
Interests: COVID-19 crisis and mental health; resilience; psycho-social care; interpersonal violence; sexual violence; youth; desistance
Prof. Dr. Isabelle Hansez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Psychology, Université de Liège, 4000 LiÅ ge, Belgium
2. ARCh Research Unit (Adaptation, Resilience and Change), 4000 Liège, Belgium
Interests: well-being at work; stress and burnout; work engagement
Prof. Dr. Adélaide Blavier
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Psychology, Université de Liège, 4000 LiÅ ge, Belgium
2. ARCh Research Unit (Adaptation, Resilience and Change), 4000 Liège, Belgium
Interests: psychological trauma; sexual Violence; sense of parental competence

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The COVID-19 pandemic crisis began in March 2020 with strict containment measures imposed in most countries to contain the spread of the virus. Recent studies have highlighted the deleterious effects of the first waves of COVID-19 on the mental health and well-being of the general population. More than a year has passed since the onset of the crisis, and psychological distress and emotional exhaustion among people of all ages are on the rise. Educational institutions, outpatient psychological and social care services, and residential services such as prisons and youth welfare institutions have been operating for more than a year under the pressure of the crisis and the associated health measures. In the face of the adversity of this long and unprecedented health crisis, people and institutions have had to "cope" and develop strategies to survive. It is essential to recognize the multiple traumas associated with this crisis in different population groups (in terms of age, gender, social level, social vulnerabilities, and sector of activity). It is also recommended to identify the different processes and types of resilience that have been developed during this crisis. The aim is to develop and strengthen policies that support the resilience of people and institutions in the post-COVID-19 crisis.

Prof. Dr. Fabienne Glowacz
Prof. Dr. Isabelle Hansez
Prof. Dr. Adélaide Blavier
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • impact of COVID-19 pandemic
  • trauma
  • mental health
  • burnout
  • well-being
  • psychosocial care workers
  • institutions
  • resilience
  • crisis exit process
  • post-COVID-19 crisis

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Burnout in Primary Care Physicians in Catalonia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9031; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18179031 - 27 Aug 2021
Viewed by 731
Abstract
Background: Recent demands to raise the clinical quality, improve the patient experience, and decrease costs have progressively increased burnout among primary care physicians. This overstretched situation has been greatly aggravated since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of the study is [...] Read more.
Background: Recent demands to raise the clinical quality, improve the patient experience, and decrease costs have progressively increased burnout among primary care physicians. This overstretched situation has been greatly aggravated since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of the study is to analyse the prevalence of burnout among primary care physicians and to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on burnout. Methods: This was a multicentre longitudinal descriptive study of occupational factors and burnout before and since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. In order to assess the impact of the pandemic on burnout in primary care physicians, two paired groups of physicians were compared using Wilcoxon’s and McNemar’s tests. Results: In January 2019, 10% of primary care physicians scored high on all burnout domains. Seven months into the COVID-19 pandemic (October 2020), this percentage increased to 50%. Paired groups analysis showed unprecedented worsening due to the pandemic: emotional exhaustion, which already affected 55% of primary care physicians, jumped to 77%. Conclusions: Burnout is endemic among primary care physicians. It has been associated with lower patient satisfaction, reduced health outcomes, and increased costs. The COVID-19 pandemic has pushed burnout in primary care professionals to the edge. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Psychological Distress among Students in Higher Education: One Year after the Beginning of the COVID-19 Pandemic
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7445; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147445 - 12 Jul 2021
Viewed by 1119
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the psychological well-being of students. Several stressors (such as socioeconomic and education-related contexts) could influence mental health, as well as individual and relational dimensions. This study proposes to evaluate the predictive effect of these factors on anxiety and [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the psychological well-being of students. Several stressors (such as socioeconomic and education-related contexts) could influence mental health, as well as individual and relational dimensions. This study proposes to evaluate the predictive effect of these factors on anxiety and depressive symptoms among students in higher education one year after the beginning of the pandemic. A sample of 23,307 students (Mage = 20.89; SD = 1.96; 69.08% of women) was assessed through an online self-report questionnaire including adapted and validated measures. The main rates were as follows: 50.6% of students presented anxiety symptoms; 55.1% reported depressive symptoms; 20.8% manifested suicidal ideations; 42.4% saw their financial situation deteriorate; 39.1% felt they were dropping out of school. One year after the beginning of the pandemic, students in higher education are anxious and depressed, especially those who identify as women (for both anxiety and depression) and as a non-binary gender (only for anxiety), experience a deterioration in their financial situation, are dropping out of school, or manifest hostility (for both anxiety and depression). The degree of study affects the symptoms’ severity (Bachelor 2 and 3 for anxiety and Master for depression). Contact with family and friends (for both anxiety and depression) as well as regular physical activity (only for depression) should provide some protection against psychological distress. Policy-makers must make a long-term investment in the well-being and positive mental health of the student community. Full article
Back to TopTop