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Special Issue "Pediatric Exercise and Health Outcomes"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. emer Dr. Han C. G. Kemper
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, 1218 HD Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Interests: exercise science; sports science; nutrition; exercise physiology; bone health
Prof. Dr. Romulo Fernandes
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Laboratory of InVestigation in Exercise (LIVE), Department of Physical Education, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Presidente Prudente 19060-900, Brazil
Interests: pediatric exercise; pediatric bone health; sports

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue on “Pediatric Exercise and Health Outcomes” in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, which is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. More detailed information can be found in https://0-www-mdpi-com.brum.beds.ac.uk/journal/ijerph.

Physical activity level is a relevant determinant of the health status of children and adolescents. Therefore, it is important to understand how it’s different manifestations (e.g., physical education classes, sports participation, physical exercise, and sedentary behavior) can contribute to health during childhood and adolescence. The submission of prospective studies (e.g., cohort and randomized clinical trials) investigating the impact of physical activity manifestations on different health outcomes (e.g., bone health, body fatness, and cardiovascular and metabolic aspects) is encouraged, but well-designed cross-sectional studies are also welcome. All studies should involve participants up until the age of 19 years-old, in order to be characterized into pediatric groups.

This Special Issue is open to any subject area related to the pediatric exercise sciences. The listed keywords suggest a few of the many possibilities.

Prof. emer Han C. G. Kemper
Prof. Dr. Romulo Fernandes
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Physical activity
  • Physical exercise
  • Sport
  • Sedentary behavior
  • Physical fitness
  • Pediatrics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Can Replacing Sitting Time with Standing Time Improve Adolescents’ Cardiometabolic Health?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(17), 3115; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16173115 - 27 Aug 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1603
Abstract
This study aimed to assess the effects of isotemporal replacement of sitting time (SIT) with standing (STA) on cardiometabolic biomarkers. In this cross-sectional study, male adolescents wore the GT3X+ activity monitor for 7 days to measure the SIT and STA. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity [...] Read more.
This study aimed to assess the effects of isotemporal replacement of sitting time (SIT) with standing (STA) on cardiometabolic biomarkers. In this cross-sectional study, male adolescents wore the GT3X+ activity monitor for 7 days to measure the SIT and STA. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was estimated by a youth-specific cut-off point. An isotemporal substitution approach was used to examine the effects of replacing different periods of SIT (15, 30, 60, and 120 min) with STA on cardiometabolic biomarkers [total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), non-HDL-c, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), triglycerides (TG), glucose, insulin, HOMA2-β, HOMA2-S, and HOMA2-IR]. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) with a post-hoc Bonferroni test was used to compare the adjusted means between the four subgroups that were clustered according to SIT and STA amount. Adolescents (n = 84; age, 16.7 ± 0.9 years) wore GT3X+ for 15.2 ± 2.3 h, for 6.7 ± 0.6 days. Isotemporal substitution of SIT with STA was associated with TC, non-HDL-c, LDL-c, and TG. ANCOVA results showed a statistically significant difference for TC, non-HDL-c, and LDL-c. These findings showed that for male adolescents, sitting less and standing more may be an effective alternative to reduce cardiometabolic biomarker levels related to lipid metabolism, regardless of MVPA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Exercise and Health Outcomes)
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Article
Feasibility and Reliability of Physical Fitness Tests among Colombian Preschool Children
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(17), 3069; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16173069 - 23 Aug 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1428
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess the feasibility and reliability of physical fitness field tests used in the “Fuprecol kids” study among Colombian preschool children aged 3–5 years. A total of 90 preschoolers aged 3–5 years participated in the study. Weight, [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to assess the feasibility and reliability of physical fitness field tests used in the “Fuprecol kids” study among Colombian preschool children aged 3–5 years. A total of 90 preschoolers aged 3–5 years participated in the study. Weight, height, waist circumference, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), musculoskeletal fitness (handgrip strength and standing broad jump), speed–agility (4 × 10 m shuttle run), and flexibility (sit and reach test) components were tested twice (two weeks apart). The feasibility of the tests (preschoolers able to complete the test) ranged from 96% in the CRF test to 100% in the musculoskeletal fitness, speed–agility, and flexibility tests. Overall, the %TEMs were 0.625% for the weight, 0.378% for the height, 1.035% for the body mass index, and 0.547% for the waist circumference. In addition, all tests were substantial reliable, for CRF (in stages and laps, concordance correlation coefficient = 0.944 and 0.941, respectively) in both sexes and flexibility (concordance correlation coefficient = 0.949) in girls. There were no significant differences in fitness test–retest mean differences in the boys (p > 0.05), except in CRF (laps p = 0.017). In girls, there were differences in CRF (stages (p = 0.017) and laps (p = 0.013)), and flexibility (p = 0.002) variables. The results from this study indicate that the “Fuprecol kids” battery of tests, administered by physical education teachers, was reliable and feasible for measuring components of physical fitness in preschoolers in a school setting in Colombia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Exercise and Health Outcomes)
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