Special Issue "Physical Activity and Exercise in the Management of Chronic Disease"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Sechang Oh
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575, Japan
Interests: exercise; physical activity; non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; nutrition; dietary behavior; diabetes; sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Current estimations support a potential decline in life expectancy and quality due to increased chronic diseases such as sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cancer, cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and cognitive dysfunction. Furthermore, chronic diseases present a considerable burden on society by increasing health and social care costs. Our current understanding of daily physical activity and regular exercise helps manage symptoms and improve overall chronic conditions safely and affordably. However, we do not have sufficient scientific evidence of most chronic disease pathophysiology, and we currently cannot provide medical exercise prescriptions appropriate for each patient in most chronic diseases.

The present Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) focuses on how physical activity and exercise can provide a non-invasive role for chronic disease prevention and treatment and delivering a safe and effective exercise prescription for physicians, exercise specialists, and physiotherapists. Papers dealing with the efficacy of alternative exercise available in various medical and physiology fields will also be collected. Research papers, reviews, and case reports are welcome. Other accepted manuscript formats include methodological papers, position papers, brief reports, and commentaries.

Dr. Sechang Oh
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • exercise
  • physical activity
  • non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
  • dietary behavior
  • diabetes
  • cardiovascular disease
  • sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome
  • chronic disease
  • obesity

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Relationships of Dietary Habits and Physical Activity Status with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Featuring Advanced Fibrosis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 8918; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18178918 - 25 Aug 2021
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Abstract
(1) Aim: Hepatic fibrosis is a prognostic factor for disease progression in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We aimed to determine the relationships between diet, physical activity, and the progression of liver fibrosis. (2) Methods: The 349 participants were categorized by their FibroScan-aspartate [...] Read more.
(1) Aim: Hepatic fibrosis is a prognostic factor for disease progression in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We aimed to determine the relationships between diet, physical activity, and the progression of liver fibrosis. (2) Methods: The 349 participants were categorized by their FibroScan-aspartate aminotransferase score, and they completed a questionnaire regarding their diet and physical activity. (3) Results: There were 233 patients in the negative-on-screening group, 78 in the gray zone group, and 38 in the positive-on-screening group. The frequencies of consumption of soybeans and soybean products and of light-colored vegetables were lower in the positive group; whereas the frequencies of consumption of snack food and fried sweets, jelly and pudding, fried food, and butter, lard, and beef tallow were higher. The odds ratios for the fibrosis progression in patients who consumed fried food ≥4 times/week was 2.21. The positive group also showed lower physical activity level (PAL) and exercise (Ex, metabolic equivalents for tasks (METs)/hour/week). The patients who undertook Ex at >7.5 had an odds ratio of 0.21 for the fibrosis progression. (4) Conclusion: High consumption of fried food and low Ex are risk factors for the fibrosis progression in NAFLD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Exercise in the Management of Chronic Disease)
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Article
Effects of Exercise on the Oral Microbiota and Saliva of Patients with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3470; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18073470 - 26 Mar 2021
Viewed by 1578
Abstract
Exercise can be hypothesized to play an important role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) treatment by changing the oral bacterial flora and in the mechanism underlying periodontal disease. We performed salivary component analysis before and after an exercise regimen, and genome analysis [...] Read more.
Exercise can be hypothesized to play an important role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) treatment by changing the oral bacterial flora and in the mechanism underlying periodontal disease. We performed salivary component analysis before and after an exercise regimen, and genome analysis of the oral bacterial flora to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Obese middle-aged men with NAFLD and periodontal disease were allocated to 12-week exercise (n = 49) or dietary restriction (n = 21) groups. We collected saliva to compare the oral microflora; performed predictive analysis of metagenomic functions; and, measured the salivary immunoglobulin A, cytokine, bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and lactoferrin concentrations. The exercise group showed improvements in the clinical indices of oral environment. Salivary component analysis revealed significant reductions in LPS, and lactoferrin during the exercise regimen. Diversity analysis of oral bacterial flora revealed higher alpha- and beta-diversity after the exercise regimen. Analysis of the microbial composition revealed that the numbers of Campylobacter (+83.9%), Corynebacterium (+142.3%), Actinomyces (+75.9%), and Lautropia (+172.9%) were significantly higher, and that of Prevotella (−28.3%) was significantly lower. The findings suggest that an exercise regimen improves the oral environment of NAFLD patients by increasing the diversity of the oral microflora and reducing the number of periodontal bacteria that produce LPS and its capability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Exercise in the Management of Chronic Disease)
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