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Special Issue "Validity and Reliability of Physical Fitness Testing"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Sport and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. José Carmelo Adsuar Sala
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Health, Economy, Motricity and Education (HEME) Research Group, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Extremadura, 10003 Cáceres, Spain
Interests: sexuality and health related quality of life; health education; comprehensive sexuality education (CSE); education and innovation; global health; physical and sports activities as a strategy to promote a healthy society; physical activity interventions; exercise training physical exercise; physical health; assessment of physical capacity; health, quality of life in groups of subjects and active lifestyle (elderly, children, type 2 diabetes, parkinson, etc.); balance and muscle strength; rehabilitation; osteoporosis; fall prevention; validity and reliability of physical fitness testing; active tourism; outdoor behavioral healthcare; wilderness therapy; forest bathing; shinrin-yoku
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Some parameters of physical fitness have been associated with health. Higher levels of maximal oxygen consumption, for example, which is an indicator of cardiorespiratory fitness, describe a better health status, while higher muscle strength (1RM) has also been associated with healthier status. However, in some populations, measuring VO2max or 1RM can be compromised, so it is important to determine the validity and reliability of alternative physical fitness tests in chronic disease or special populations. Therefore, the purpose of this Special Issue is to present reliable and valid physical tests that can be used to evaluate physical fitness in different populations.

Dr. José Carmelo Adsuar
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • feasibility
  • intraclass correlation coefficient
  • minimal detectable change
  • physical fitness
  • reliable
  • reproducibility
  • standard error of measurement
  • smallest real difference
  • test–retest
  • valid

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Test–Retest Reliability of an iPhone® Inclinometer Application to Assess the Lumbar Joint Repositioning Error in Non-Specific Chronic Low Back Pain
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(5), 2489; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18052489 - 03 Mar 2021
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Abstract
Background: The joint position sense (JPS) has been used as an indirect marker of proprioception in subjects with non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP), showing impairment in previous studies. It seems necessary to devise reliable tests to measure proprioceptive deficits in subjects with [...] Read more.
Background: The joint position sense (JPS) has been used as an indirect marker of proprioception in subjects with non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP), showing impairment in previous studies. It seems necessary to devise reliable tests to measure proprioceptive deficits in subjects with NSLBP. The objective of this study was to analyse the test–retest reliability and smallest real difference (SRD) of lumbar proprioception through the JPS indicator in a sample of patients with NSCLBP. Methods: Fifty participants with NSCLBP performed three repetitions of 30° lumbar flexion while standing and sitting using the iPhone® inclinometer application to measure the lumbar joint repositioning error. For the reliability analysis, we performed an intra-session test–retest. Results: The total sample ICC values were excellent for standing (0.96) and sitting (0.93) 30° lumbar flexion. In addition, our results showed that, for the total sample, an SRD < 12% can be considered as a true change in proprioception concerning this procedure. On the other hand, men have better reliability than women in both standing and sitting positions. Additionally, the sitting position has better reliability than the standing position. The standard error of measurement (SEM) percentage was 4.2 for standing and 3.8 for sitting. The SRD percentage was 11.6 for standing and 10.4 for sitting. Conclusions: The iPhone® inclinometer seems reliable for assessing proprioceptive ability through the lumbar joint repositioning error in subjects with NSCLBP in both standing (ICC = 0.96) and sitting (ICC = 0.93) positions. This technological device showed a lower measurement error for sitting position (SRD < 12%). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Validity and Reliability of Physical Fitness Testing)
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Article
Test–Retest Reliability of a Conventional Gait Model for Registering Joint Angles during Initial Contact and Toe-Off in Healthy Subjects
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 1343; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18031343 - 02 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 863
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the test–retest reliability of a conventional gait model (CGM), the Plug-in Gait model, to calculate the angles of the hip, knee, and ankle during initial contact (IC) and toe-off (TO). Gait analysis was performed using [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to evaluate the test–retest reliability of a conventional gait model (CGM), the Plug-in Gait model, to calculate the angles of the hip, knee, and ankle during initial contact (IC) and toe-off (TO). Gait analysis was performed using the Vicon Motion System® (Oxford Metrics, Oxford, UK). The study group consisted of 50 healthy subjects. To evaluate the test–retest reliability, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), the standard error of measurement (SEM), the minimal detectable change (MDC), and the Bland–Altman analysis with 95% limits of agreement were calculated. The ICC for the joint angles of the hip, knee, and ankle was higher than 0.80. However, the ankle angle at IC had an ICC lower than 0.80. The SEM was <5° for all parameters. The MDC was large (>5°) for the hip angle at IC. The Bland–Altman analysis indicated that the magnitude of divergence was between ±5° and ±9° at IC and around ±7° at TO. In conclusion, the ICC for the plug-in gait model was good for the hip, knee, and ankle angles during IC and TO. The plots revealed a disagreement between measurements that should be considered in patients’ clinical assessments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Validity and Reliability of Physical Fitness Testing)
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Article
Foot Health Status Questionnaire (FHSQ) in Spanish People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Preliminary Values Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3643; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103643 - 22 May 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1034
Abstract
Background and objectives: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic disease characterized by hyperglycemia. T2DM affects millions of people, and has a lot of complications such as impaired sensation in the feet. Moreover, it is important to know the health of the [...] Read more.
Background and objectives: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic disease characterized by hyperglycemia. T2DM affects millions of people, and has a lot of complications such as impaired sensation in the feet. Moreover, it is important to know the health of the feet of people with T2DM. The aim of this study is to know the preliminary values of the Foot Health Status Questionnaire (FHSQ) in people with T2DM. Materials and Methods: A total of 87 patients with T2DM with an average age of 65.56 years, divided in 54 men and 33 women, participated in this cross-sectional study. The main outcome was the health of the foot as measured by the FHSQ questionnaire. This questionnaire collects data on eight dimensions: Foot Pain, Foot Function, Shoe, General Foot Health, General Health, Physical Activity, Social Capacity, and Vigor. Results: Patients with T2DM have lower values in Foot Pain; median values in General Foot Health and high values in Foot Function, Shoe, Physical Activity and Social Capacity. Some of these dimensions are affected by age, diabetes control, Body Mass Index (BMI), and years of diagnosis. Females with T2DM have more problems than males in the Shoe, General Foot Health, Physical Activity and Vigor dimensions. Conclusions: this research gives us preliminary values of the FHSQ in Spanish patients with T2DM and divided by gender, age, diabetes control, BMI, and years of diagnosis in people with T2DM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Validity and Reliability of Physical Fitness Testing)
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