Special Issue "Physical, Psychological, and Social Health in Youth through Exercise and Healthy Behaviours"

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Armando Cocca
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Sport Science, University of Innsbruck, Fürstenweg 185, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
Interests: exercise; physical, psychological, and social health; youth; school

Special Issue Information

The International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health has now established a Special Issue on “Physical, Psychological, and Social Health in Youth through Exercise and Healthy Behaviours”.

Currently, the concept of health consists of different areas of an individual’s life, which can be grouped into physical, mental, and social domains (WHO, 1986). The physical domain refers to all those processes that are needed for the body to function and perform effectively (Capio et al., 2014). Mental health indicates a state of internal balance that allows people to perceive themselves and their lived environment in a proper manner (Galderisi et al., 2015). Social health includes all the interactions between a person and others within a community and how such interactions prompt—or hinder—personal and community growth (Waite, 2018). Each of these domains can be enhanced through healthy behaviours, which are particularly important at early ages. In fact, such behaviours learnt during youth are more likely to be maintained in adulthood and elderly life (Telama et al., 2013).

With this Special Issue, we wish to present works aimed at enhancing one or more health domains in youth through behavioural strategies and active habits.

Dr. Armando Cocca
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • behavioural change
  • exercise
  • fitness
  • disease prevention
  • risk behaviours
  • biological indicators of health
  • self-perception
  • social support
  • social inclusion
  • equality

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Effects of Online Bodyweight High-Intensity Interval Training Intervention and Health Education on the Mental Health and Cognition of Sedentary Young Females
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 302; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18010302 - 03 Jan 2021
Viewed by 1786
Abstract
This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of an online high-intensity interval training (HIIT) intervention and health education on the behaviors, mental health, and cognitive function of sedentary young females. A single-blinded, six-week, randomized controlled pilot trial involving 70 sedentary young Chinese females, [...] Read more.
This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of an online high-intensity interval training (HIIT) intervention and health education on the behaviors, mental health, and cognitive function of sedentary young females. A single-blinded, six-week, randomized controlled pilot trial involving 70 sedentary young Chinese females, aged 18–30 years, was conducted. An intervention group (IG) (n = 33) underwent a HIIT intervention and health education, while a waitlist group (WG) (n = 37) only received health education. In pre-, mid-, and post-tests, both groups filled out questionnaires about physical activity, sedentary behavior, and mental health. Cognitive functions were assessed at the pre- and post-tests by computer-administered cognitive tests. A mixed-effect model with repeated measures was used to analyze outcomes of interest. The retention rate of the IG and WG was 100% and 78.38%, respectively. The IG were found to have significantly increased rates of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) (Mdiff = 940.61, p < 0.001, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 576.67, 1304.55) from pre-test to post-test, while the WG demonstrated a more marked reduction in sedentary time (Mdiff = −73.02, p = 0.038, 95% CI: −141.90, −4.14) compared with the IG in the post-test. Moreover, anxiety and stress levels were shown to significantly reduce in the IG over the six-week period (Mdiff = −4.73, p = 0.002, 95% CI: −7.30, −2.15 and Mdiff = −5.09, p = 0.001, 95% CI: −8.29, −1.89, respectively). In addition, we observed a significant improvement in verbal ability (p = 0.008, ηp2 = 0.19) following the HIIT intervention and effects of the interaction with time on processing speed (p = 0.050, ηp2 = 0.10) and episodic memory (p = 0.048, ηp2 = 0.11). Moreover, the IG had better global cognitive performance than the WG in the post-test (Mdiff = 8.28, p = 0.003, 95% CI: 3.06, 13.50). In summary, both an online bodyweight HIIT intervention combined with health education, or health education alone, can effectively improve health-related behaviors, but the behavioral consequences may differ based on the emphasis of different intervention modalities. Furthermore, the “bodyweight HIIT plus health education” modality might be a more promising online intervention strategy to mitigate against negative emotions and improve cognitive function. Full article
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