Special Issue "Physical Activity, Physical Function and Suicide"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. In-Hwan Oh
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Korea
Interests: burden of disease; DALY; economic burden; Korea
Dr. Minha Hong
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychiatry, Myongji Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, 10475 Goyang, Korea
Interests: autism spectrum disorder; child and adolescent psychiatry; DALY; economic burden
Prof. Dr. Gapjin Oh
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Sport Marketing, Kyung Dong University, 27, Kyungdong University-ro, Yangju, Gyeonggido 11458, Korea
Interests: adolescent; physical activity; public health
Dr. Diana Bright
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research and Evaluation Division, Knowledge Directorate, Public Health Wales, CF10 4BZ Cardiff, UK
Interests: healthy lifestyles; dietary; physical activity; women; human ageing; obesity
Dr. Saengryeol Park
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Schoolof Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 02447, Korea
Interests: adolescent and psychosocial determinants of physical activity; smart aging; rehabilitation sports; mental health; behavior change

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The worldwide suicide rate is approximately 10.5 per 100,000. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), every 40 seconds a person dies from suicide. Suicide is ranked as the second and third leading cause of death in girls and boys, respectively, and it increases with age. Fortunately, many experts consistently insist that suicide is preventable. However, there is still limited evidence of both the factors and interventions related to decreased suicide rates.

Engagement in physical activity could be an effective method to relieve suicidal behavior. In addition, physical function, which is a proxy measure of physical health, and is closely associated with performing physical activity. Thus, we seek to update recent findings with respect to physical activity and physical function, and their impacts on suicide. By updating the findings, we expect to make practical evidence that could potentially help public health professionals to develop preventive strategies and design appropriate services for people at risk of suicide.

We invite investigators to publish research and review papers that examine the roles of physical activity including sedentary behavior or physical function (particularly for older adults or disease groups) on suicide by using cross-sectional, longitudinal, or large data sets from government agencies, international medical organizations, and other credible medicine-related institutes including RCTs. We especially welcome submissions examining specific populations or minority groups such as older adults, disabled persons, and disease groups.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Suicide rates by physical activity/sedentary behavior or physical function
  • Suicide rates in specific populations by physical activity/sedentary behavior or physical function
  • Comparative studies looking at patient groups with different diseases or psychiatric disorders
  • Interventions related to physical activity or physical function to relieve suicide risk
  • Suicide-related factors including physical functions or physical activity

Prof. Dr. In-Hwan Oh
Dr. Minha Hong
Prof. Dr. Gapjin Oh
Dr. Diana Bright
Dr. Saengryeol Park
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • physical activity
  • physical health
  • suicide
  • prevention strategy

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Factors Associated with Regional Years of Life Lost (YLLs) due to Suicide in South Korea
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 4961; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17144961 - 09 Jul 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 786
Abstract
South Korea’s suicide rate has remained among the highest in the world for some years, and there is also a gap in suicide rates among regions within the country. This study investigates the differences in years of life lost (YLLs) due to suicide [...] Read more.
South Korea’s suicide rate has remained among the highest in the world for some years, and there is also a gap in suicide rates among regions within the country. This study investigates the differences in years of life lost (YLLs) due to suicide in 250 districts and the factors associated with regional YLLs in South Korea in 2016. The relationships between YLLs due to suicide by region and factors such as population characteristics, health behaviors, socioeconomic factors, and mental health resources in the community were examined through multiple linear regression analysis. The gap between districts with the highest and lowest YLL due to suicide per 100,000 people was more than a 7-times difference. Factors related to YLLs due to suicide by region were physical activity rates and community mental healthcare centers, and there were differences in these factors according to gender. In conclusion, to prevent suicide at the community level, it is necessary to consider gender in establishing intervention strategies. The community needs to play an active role in promoting mental health and reducing suicide among local residents and to continue to invest in the support and management of those at high risk of suicide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity, Physical Function and Suicide)
Article
The Neglected Role of Physical Education Participation on Suicidal Ideation and Stress in High School Adolescents from South Korea
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2838; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17082838 - 20 Apr 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 998
Abstract
Adolescents are at high risk of suicidal ideation and stress. This study aimed to investigate how physical education participation predicts suicidal ideation and stress in South Korean high school students. Data from the Twelfth Korea Youth Risk Behaviour Web-Based Survey 2016 (KYRBS) were [...] Read more.
Adolescents are at high risk of suicidal ideation and stress. This study aimed to investigate how physical education participation predicts suicidal ideation and stress in South Korean high school students. Data from the Twelfth Korea Youth Risk Behaviour Web-Based Survey 2016 (KYRBS) were used for analyses. Two multiple logistic regressions were performed to determine the influence of selected factors on suicidal ideation and stress (model 1: subjective health, social support, body mass index, academic achievement, perceived economic status of family, and physical education participation; model 2: adjusting for school type and year). Model 2 revealed negative associations between subjective health, academic achievement, perceived economic status of family, social support, physical education participation (≥2 times/weekly), and suicidal ideation for male students. Female students exhibited negative associations between subjective health, social support, and academic achievement, along with a positive association between body mass index and suicidal ideation. For both genders, stress was negatively associated with subjective health, social support, academic achievement, perceived economic status of family, and physical education participation (≥2 times/weekly). These findings suggest that participating in physical education can mitigate the risk of suicidal ideation and stress among high school students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity, Physical Function and Suicide)
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Review

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Review
A Review of the Admission System for Mental Disorders in South Korea
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9159; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17249159 - 08 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 435
Abstract
This study presents a comprehensive overview of the characteristics of mental health problems and admission system in South Korea. We compared the mental health-related indicators data from South Korea to data from other Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. South Korea [...] Read more.
This study presents a comprehensive overview of the characteristics of mental health problems and admission system in South Korea. We compared the mental health-related indicators data from South Korea to data from other Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. South Korea was identified as the country with the highest suicide rate, the longest length of stay in hospitals for mental disorders, and the highest number of psychiatric care beds. These results can be explained by considering the admission system for mental disorders. We reviewed the admission system and the Mental Health Promotion and Welfare Act, providing direction for improving the system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity, Physical Function and Suicide)

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Mental health and involuntary admission system in Korea: current status and future directions
Authors: Seok-Jun Yoon
Affiliation: Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Korea University

Title: Recent trend in health care and mental health in the disabled
Authors: So-Youn Park
Affiliation: Medical Educatin and Humanities, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University

Title: Associations of physical education on suicidal ideation, suicide attempt, and suicide in middle shool students: the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey (KYRBS)
Authors: In-Hwan Oh; Saengryeol Park
Affiliation: Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea

Title: Latent profile of risk factors on sucidal ideation and suicide attempt
Authors: In-Hwan Oh; Saengryeol Park
Affiliation: Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea

Title: The neglected role of physical-education participation on suicidal ideation and stress in high school adolescents from South Korea
Authors: Saengryeol Park; So-Youn Park; Su Yeon Jang; Gapjin Oh; In-Hwan Oh
Affiliation: Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University
Abstract: Adolescents are at high risk of suicidal ideation and stress. This study aimed to investigate how physical-education participation predicts suicidal ideation and stress in South Korean high school students. We used data from the Twelfth Korea Youth Risk Behaviour Web-Based Survey 2016 (KYRBS). Two multiple logistic regressions were performed to determine the influence of selected factors on suicidal ideation and stress (model 1: subjective health, social support, body mass index, academic achievement, perceived economic status of family, and physical-education participation; model 2: adjusting for school type and year). Model 2 revealed negative associations between subjective health, academic achievement, perceived economic status of family, social support, physical-education participation (≥2 times/weekly), and suicidal ideation for male students. Female students exhibited negative associations between subjective health, social support, and academic achievement, along with a positive association between body mass index and suicidal ideation. For both genders, stress was negatively associated with subjective health, social support, academic achievement, perceived economic status of family, and physical-education participation (≥2 times/weekly). Our findings suggest that participating in physical education can mitigate the risk of suicidal ideation and stress among high school students.

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