Special Issue "Clinical and Health Psychology in Chronic Pain Management"

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Albert Feliu-Soler
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Faculty of Psychology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Cerdanyola del Vallès), Barcelona, Spain
2. Group of Psychological Research in Fibromyalgia & Chronic Pain (AGORA), Institut de Recerca Sant Joan de Déu, 08950. Esplugues de Llobregat, Spain.
Interests: chronic pain; fibromyalgia; mindfulness; acceptance; cognitive behavioural therapy; health psychology; biological psychology; randomized controlled trials; clinical effectiveness; cost-utility; psychometrics
Dr. Juan V. Luciano
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Teaching, Research & Innovation Unit, Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, 08830 St. Boi de Llobregat, Spain
2. Group of Psychological Research in Fibromyalgia & Chronic Pain (AGORA), Institut de Recerca Sant Joan de Déu, 08950. Esplugues de Llobregat, Spain.
Interests: effectiveness; cost-effectiveness; cost utility; randomized controlled trials; psychological treatment; biopsychosocial approach; psychometrics; patient-reported outcome measures
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Dr. Adrian Perez-Aranda
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Faculty of Psychology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Cerdanyola del Vallès), Barcelona, Spain
2. Group of Psychological Research in Fibromyalgia & Chronic Pain (AGORA), Institut de Recerca Sant Joan de Déu, 08950. Esplugues de Llobregat, Spain.3. Health Research Institute of Aragon (IIS Aragón), Zaragoza, Spain
Interests: fibromyalgia; chronic pain; effectiveness; cost utility; randomized controlled trials; third-wave psychotherapy; mediation analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Chronic pain has a high prevalence in the general population worldwide and is associated with severe functional impairment, poor quality of life, and elevated health care and societal costs. It represents a great challenge for health professionals due to the scarcity of treatment options that provide improvements of relevant clinical significance. To date, the effectiveness of pharmacological interventions has been generally limited, and more ubiquitous effects have been found for nonpharmacological treatments such as different cognitive-behavioral approaches. For this Special Issue on “Chronic pain and Health Psychology”, cutting-edge research on the following topics is welcome: the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and neurobiological underpinnings of psychological therapies in individuals experiencing chronic pain. Given that multicomponent approaches are common (and even recommended) in chronic pain, Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) evaluating psychotherapy as a stand-alone intervention or in the context of multicomponent approaches to chronic pain will be considered. RCTs including mediation analyses for a deeper understanding of the psychobiological mechanisms behind therapeutic effects will be particularly welcome. Furthermore, studies exploring potential moderators/predictors of clinical response are needed in order to change the paradigm from one-size-fits-all to personalized care. For comparability purposes, studies adopting the Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) recommendations will also be strongly appreciated. Since the start of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, health systems have faced new difficulties in the delivery of interventions (e.g., limited access to standard face-to-face therapies), studies evaluating “pandemic-resistant” approaches for chronic pain (e.g., online interventions) are especially welcome. Although this Special Issue will focus on RCTs, it is also open to high-quality systematic reviews and meta-analyses on the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and neurobiological underpinnings of psychotherapies in chronic pain.

Dr. Albert Feliu-Soler
Dr. Juan V. Luciano
Dr. Adrian Perez-Aranda
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • effectiveness
  • chronic pain
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
  • psychotherapy
  • cost-effectiveness
  • biomarkers
  • mediation analysis
  • personalized care

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Effects of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Chronic Pain: A Multicenter Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 6951; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18136951 - 29 Jun 2021
Viewed by 456
Abstract
The prevalence of chronic pain in Spain is 15%. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy on patients with chronic pain. A quasi-experimental design of repeated measures pre- and post-test (N = 57) was carried [...] Read more.
The prevalence of chronic pain in Spain is 15%. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy on patients with chronic pain. A quasi-experimental design of repeated measures pre- and post-test (N = 57) was carried out at three hospitals from the province of Alicante. Self-reported assessment measurements of pain intensity, anxiety-depression symptoms, perception of health status, interference of pain on sleep, self-efficacy in pain, acceptance, and mindfulness attitude were included. The T-test indicates significant differences in intensity of present pain, mental quality of life, and depression (medium effect sizes), as well as in self-efficacy: total score, symptom management and pain control (medium effect sizes), sleep disturbances and quantity of sleep (large effect sizes). MBCT is effective in reducing many symptoms in patients with chronic pain, although its maintenance needs to be further investigated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical and Health Psychology in Chronic Pain Management)
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Article
Assessing the Functional Status of Patients with Chronic Pain—Cross Cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Properties of the Serbian Version of the Pain Disability Questionnaire
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 6911; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18136911 - 28 Jun 2021
Viewed by 488
Abstract
The Pain Disability Questionnaire (PDQ) has established itself as a leading patient-reported outcome measure for assessing both mental and physical components of pain-related disability. The current study aimed to translate the PDQ into Serbian and validate its psychometric properties. Following a standard translation [...] Read more.
The Pain Disability Questionnaire (PDQ) has established itself as a leading patient-reported outcome measure for assessing both mental and physical components of pain-related disability. The current study aimed to translate the PDQ into Serbian and validate its psychometric properties. Following a standard translation process, a total of 554 chronic pain patients (average age 55.37 ± 12.72 years; 375 (67.5%) females) completed the PDQ-Serb, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form-36 (SF-36), pain intensity rating and a six-minute walk test (6MWT). Responsiveness was examined in a subsample of 141 patients who completed an inpatient rehabilitation program. The internal consistency of the PDQ-Serb was excellent (Cronbach α = 0.92) and test-retest reliability was favorable (ICC = 0.87). Factor analyses found a bifactor model to be the best fit (CFI = 0.97: TLI = 0.96: RMSEA = 0.05; SRMR = 0.03). Statistically significant Pearson’s coefficient correlations (p < 0.001) were found between the PDQ-Serb and ODI (r = 0.786), SF-36 Physical Components summary (r = −0.659), SF-36 Mental Components summary (r = −0.493), pain intensity rating (r = 0.572), and 6MWT (r = −0.571). Significant post-treatment improvements following inpatient rehabilitation were found with the PDQ-Serb (p < 0.001; effect size 0.431) and other clinical variables (p < 0.001; effect sizes from 0.367 to 0.536). The PDQ-Serb was shown to be a reliable and valid self-report instrument for the evaluation of pain-related disability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical and Health Psychology in Chronic Pain Management)
Article
Subgrouping a Large U.S. Sample of Patients with Fibromyalgia Using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire-Revised
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 247; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18010247 - 31 Dec 2020
Viewed by 837
Abstract
Fibromyalgia (FM) is a heterogeneous and complex syndrome; different studies have tried to describe subgroups of FM patients, and a 4-cluster classification based on the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire-Revised (FIQR) has been recently validated. This study aims to cross-validate this classification in a large [...] Read more.
Fibromyalgia (FM) is a heterogeneous and complex syndrome; different studies have tried to describe subgroups of FM patients, and a 4-cluster classification based on the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire-Revised (FIQR) has been recently validated. This study aims to cross-validate this classification in a large US sample of FM patients. A pooled sample of 6280 patients was used. First, we computed a hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) using FIQR scores at item level. Then, a latent profile analysis (LPA) served to confirm the accuracy of the taxonomy. Additionally, a cluster calculator was developed to estimate the predicted subgroup using an ordinal regression analysis. Self-reported clinical measures were used to examine the external validity of the subgroups in part of the sample. The HCA yielded a 4-subgroup distribution, which was confirmed by the LPA. Each cluster represented a different level of severity: “Mild–moderate”, “moderate”, “moderate–severe”, and “severe”. Significant differences between clusters were observed in most of the clinical measures (e.g., fatigue, sleep problems, anxiety). Interestingly, lower levels of education were associated with higher FM severity. This study corroborates a 4-cluster distribution based on FIQR scores to classify US adults with FM. The classification may have relevant clinical implications for diagnosis and treatment response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical and Health Psychology in Chronic Pain Management)
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