Special Issue "Rehabilitation in Health Systems, Rehabilitation Needs and Innovative Rehabilitation Programs"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Christoph Gutenbrunner
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Hannover Medical School, 30625 Hanover, Germany
Interests: clincal rehabilitation; rehabilitation systems research; rehabilitation service assessment; pain; muscuoloskeletal conditions; rehabilitation outcomes research
Dr. Boya Nugraha
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Hannover Medical School, 30625 Hanover, Germany
Interests: rehabilitation systems research; rehabilitation service assessment; pain mechanism; role of immune system in rehabilitation; rehabilitation outcomes research

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Rehabilitation is one of five main health strategies, and at the same time is an integral part of, Universal Health Coverage. However, the World Report on Disability that was published by the World Health Organization in 2011 provided strong evidence that around the world a huge number of persons in need for rehabilitation do not have access to qualified rehabilitation services. Ten years later it is important to look at changes, new epidemiological data, rehabilitation concepts, their integration into health systems, and their impact on the outcomes of innovative rehabilitation concepts.

The Special Issue ‘’Rehabilitation in Health Systems, Rehabilitation Needs, and Innovative Rehabilitation Programs’’ will be open for scientific papers addressing these topics. New scientific information on the integration of rehabilitation in health systems; rehabilitation needs; as well as the outcomes of rehabilitation programs will be welcome. Methodological papers are also welcome. The Editors will be happy if rehabilitation concepts in low- and lower-middle-income countries including community-based rehabilitation can be included in the Special Issue. Papers on vulnerable groups and rare diseases are welcome too.  

The papers of the Special Issue also can contribute to WHO’s initiative “Rehabilitation 2030—a Call for Action”.

Prof. Dr. Christoph Gutenbrunner
Dr. Boya Nugraha
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • rehabilitation services
  • health systems
  • rehabilitation needs
  • rehabilitation programs
  • outcome research

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Development International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Set for Post Total Knee Replacement Rehabilitation Program: Delphi-Based Consensus Study in Taiwan
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1630; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041630 - 09 Feb 2021
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Abstract
Osteoarthritis is one of the leading causes of disability. Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a surgical intervention for patients with severe osteoarthritis. Post TKA rehabilitation is crucial for improving patient’s quality of life. However, traditional rehabilitation has only focused on physical function; a [...] Read more.
Osteoarthritis is one of the leading causes of disability. Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a surgical intervention for patients with severe osteoarthritis. Post TKA rehabilitation is crucial for improving patient’s quality of life. However, traditional rehabilitation has only focused on physical function; a systemic analysis of other dimensions such as social participation and environmental factors of post TKA rehabilitation is lacking. The aim of this study was to develop a core set from the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to create a comprehensive rehabilitation program for patients with osteoarthritis post TKA. Before the Delphi-based consensus process, a literature review process was performed for related ICF categories selection. We used a three-round Delphi-based consensus among 20 physical therapists with orthopedic rehabilitation expertise in a university-based hospital. A five-point Likert scale was used to rate the importance of each item. The consensus of ratings was analyzed using Spearman’s rho and semi-interquartile range indices. The ICF core set for post TKA rehabilitation was determined based on a high level of consensus and a mean score of ≥4.0 in the third Delphi-based consensus round. The ICF core set comprised 32 categories, with 13 regarding body function, four regarding body structures, nine regarding activities and participation, four regarding environmental factors, and two regarding personal factors. Our ICF core set for post TKA rehabilitation can provide information on effective rehabilitation strategies and goal setting for patients post TKA. However, further validation and feasibility assessments are warranted. Full article
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Article
Performance of the Hendrich Fall Risk Model II in Patients Discharged from Rehabilitation Wards. A Preliminary Study of Predictive Ability
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1444; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041444 - 04 Feb 2021
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Abstract
(1) Background: Falls are a dangerous adverse event in patients discharged from rehabilitation units, with the risk of falling being higher in the first weeks after discharge. In this study, we assessed the predictive performance of the Hendrich Fall Risk Model II tool [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Falls are a dangerous adverse event in patients discharged from rehabilitation units, with the risk of falling being higher in the first weeks after discharge. In this study, we assessed the predictive performance of the Hendrich Fall Risk Model II tool (HIIFRM) when administered before discharging patients to their home from rehabilitative units in orthopedic (OR), neurologic (NR) and pulmonary (PR) rehabilitation wards. (2) Methods: Over a 6-month period, all adult patients who returned home after discharge were assessed by HIIFRM. At six months from discharge the occurrence of falls was obtained by performing a structured survey. The HIIFRM predictive performance was determined by the area under the ROC curve (AUC), sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) for the whole sample and split by ward. (3) Results: 85 of 141 discharged patients were living at home and agreed to take part in the survey. Of these, 19 subjects fell, 6 suffered fractures or head traumas and 5 were hospitalized. The AUC was 0.809 (95% CI: 0.656–0.963), Se was 0.67 (0.30–0.93) and Sp was 0.79 (0.63–0.90) for OR patients. (4) Conclusions: Our preliminary results support the use of HIIFRM as a tool to be administered to OR patients at discharge and provides data for the design of a large study of predictive ability. Full article
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Review

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Review
The Unmet Needs of Community-Dwelling Stroke Survivors: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Studies
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 2140; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18042140 - 22 Feb 2021
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Abstract
The unmet needs perceived by community-dwelling stroke survivors may truly reflect the needs of patients, which is crucial for pleasant emotional experiences and a better quality of life for community-dwelling survivors not living in institutionalized organizations. The purpose of the study is to [...] Read more.
The unmet needs perceived by community-dwelling stroke survivors may truly reflect the needs of patients, which is crucial for pleasant emotional experiences and a better quality of life for community-dwelling survivors not living in institutionalized organizations. The purpose of the study is to identify the scope of unmet needs from the perspectives of stroke patients in the community. A qualitative meta-synthesis was performed according to the Joanna Briggs Institute method. Six electronic databases were searched from inception to February 2020. A total of 24 articles were involved, providing data on 378 stroke survivors. Eight categories were derived from 63 findings, and then summarized into four synthesized findings based on the framework of ICF: (1) unmet needs regarding with the disease-related information; (2) unmet physical recovery and activity/participation needs; (3) unmet needs for social environmental resources; (4) unmet psycho-emotional support needs. We found the framework of ICF mostly complete, but unmet information needs still remain. The needs that are mainly unsatisfied include physical, psychosocial and informational, as well as the practical support from professional or environment resources. The ever-present unmet needs perceived by community-dwelling stroke survivors who do not live in institutions are discoverable and mitigable. Future studies should focus on quantifying unmet needs comprehensively derived from experiential domains, assessing the rationality of the unmet needs expressed by patients’ perspectives and developing flexible strategies for long-term and changing needs. Full article
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Other

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Protocol
Enhance Access to Pulmonary Rehabilitation with a Structured and Personalized Home-Based Program—reabilitAR: Protocol for Real-World Setting
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 6132; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18116132 - 06 Jun 2021
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Abstract
Home-based models represent one of the solutions to respond to the poor accessibility of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) services in patients with chronic respiratory disease (CRD). The main goal of this protocol is to present the implementation of the first nationwide home-based PR program— [...] Read more.
Home-based models represent one of the solutions to respond to the poor accessibility of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) services in patients with chronic respiratory disease (CRD). The main goal of this protocol is to present the implementation of the first nationwide home-based PR program—reabilitAR—in Portugal and the strategies to assess its benefits in patients with CRD. The program consists of 2 phases: a 12-week intensive phase and a 40-week maintenance phase (total: 52 weeks, 1 year). The intervention in both phases is composed of presential home visits and phone-call follow ups, including exercise training and the self-management educational program Living Well with COPD. Dyspnea, impact of the disease, emotional status, and level of dyspnea during activities of daily living are used as patient-reported outcomes measures. A one-minute sit-to-stand test is used as a functional outcome, and the number of steps as a measure of physical activity. To ensure safety, fall risk and the cognitive function are assessed. Data are collected at baseline, at 12 weeks, at 26 weeks and at 52 weeks. This is the first nationwide protocol on enhancing access to PR, providing appropriate responses to CRD patients’ needs through a structured and personalized home-based program in Portugal. Full article
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