Special Issue "School Violence, Diversity and Psychosocial Environment: Bullying, Cyberbullying, Discrimination and Social Exclusion"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Antonio Jesús Rodríguez-Hidalgo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Cátedra de Cooperación al Desarrollo, University of Cordoba, Avda. San Alberto Magno S/N, 14071 Córdoba, Spain
Interests: bullying; cyberbullying; social exclusion; discrimination; ethnic-cultural bullying; homophobic bullying
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Daniel Falla Fernández
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, University of Cordoba, Avda. San Alberto Magno S/N, 14071 Córdoba, Spain
Interests: bullying; cyberbullying; moral disengagement; social-emotional development; disability
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bullying, cyberbullying, discrimination, and social exclusion are serious problems in developing a sustainable school environment, with harmful consequences for the health of those involved. One of the challenges facing the current education system is the question of how to create diversity without generating any type of exclusion or aggression process. Only by building an inclusive education will a global and interconnected world be achieved with ethical and sustainable thinking. Articles on the generic phenomena of bullying or cyberbullying, as well as on the specific phenomena of bullying based on stigma, discrimination and/or social exclusion, are welcomed. Studies into the role of those involved, social dynamics, associated psychosocial variables, their precursor or protective factors, their effects and consequences, the evidence of the effectiveness of prevention strategies, among others, are of interest to this Special Issue.

Dr. Antonio Jesús Rodríguez-Hidalgo
Dr. Daniel Falla Fernández
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Bullying or cyberbullying 
  • Stigma-based bullying 
  • Discrimination in childhood or youth 
  • Ethnic-cultural bullying or racism in schools 
  • Homophobic or transphobic violence in education 
  • Bullying around special educational needs and disabilities 
  • Sexual bullying among peers 
  • Social exclusion among peers 
  • Sustainable school environment

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Development of Structural Model on Suicidal Ideation in Adolescents’ Exposure to Violence
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 3215; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18063215 - 19 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 725
Abstract
Purpose: This study developed and examined a structural model and influencing factors of suicidal ideation by path analysis of family violence exposure, school violence exposure, anger, aggression, depression, hopelessness, and ego resilience among adolescents. Methods: A hypothetical model was constructed on the basis [...] Read more.
Purpose: This study developed and examined a structural model and influencing factors of suicidal ideation by path analysis of family violence exposure, school violence exposure, anger, aggression, depression, hopelessness, and ego resilience among adolescents. Methods: A hypothetical model was constructed on the basis of general strain theory developed by Agnew, as well as a review of studies in the literature related to suicidal ideation in adolescents in terms of violence exposure. The subjects were 1150 middle school students located in P city and K province. The model included 8 concepts and 24 paths. Data were collected using self-report questionnaires from September 2 to 20, 2013, and analyzed using the IBM SPSS and AMOS 21.0 programs. Results: Family violence exposure, school violence exposure, anger, depression, hopelessness, and ego resilience showed a direct effect, while aggression showed an indirect effect on suicidal ideation in adolescents. These factors accounted for 45% of the variance of suicidal ideation in middle school students in terms of violence exposure. Conclusions: The results suggest that suicidal ideation of adolescents who are exposed to violence could be decreased by increasing ego resilience and reducing family violence exposure. It is necessary to develop an intervention strategy to prevent suicidal ideation. Full article
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Article
Moral Reasoning about Aggressive Behavior in Relation to Type of Aggression, Age and Gender in South Korean Pupils
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(5), 2288; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18052288 - 25 Feb 2021
Viewed by 781
Abstract
Studies of moral reasoning in relation to aggressive behaviors have paid limited attention to different types of aggression, and have mainly been conducted in Western societies. We describe findings from a study of 157 children, aged 6 or 11 years, from two schools [...] Read more.
Studies of moral reasoning in relation to aggressive behaviors have paid limited attention to different types of aggression, and have mainly been conducted in Western societies. We describe findings from a study of 157 children, aged 6 or 11 years, from two schools in South Korea. Using a cartoon scenario methodology, we assessed moral reasoning about eight types of aggression: verbal, physical individual, physical group, social exclusion, rumor spreading, breaking one’s belongings, sending a nasty text via mobile phone, and sending a nasty message/email via computer. Four aspects of moral reasoning were assessed: moral judgment, harmfulness, reason for judgment, and causal responsibility. Many significant differences by type of aggression were found, especially for social exclusion (seen as less wrong and harmful, and more the victim’s responsibility), physical group aggression (seen as more wrong or harmful, and a matter of fairness, especially in older children and boys), and cyber aggression (seen more as the aggressor’s responsibility). Older children gave more reasons based on welfare, and fewer “don’t know” responses for reasons and attributions. Gender differences were relatively few, but girls did make more use of welfare in the moral reasoning domain. Findings are discussed in relation to previous research and the cultural context in South Korea. Full article
Article
Relationship between Amount, Type, Enjoyment of Physical Activity and Physical Education Performance with Cyberbullying in Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 2038; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18042038 - 19 Feb 2021
Viewed by 743
Abstract
(1) Background: Cyberbullying is a social concern in adolescents. The practice of physical activity is a key factor in protection against cyberbullying related to the multiple psychological benefits. Therefore, the study sets out to analyse the relationship between amount, types, enjoyment of physical [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Cyberbullying is a social concern in adolescents. The practice of physical activity is a key factor in protection against cyberbullying related to the multiple psychological benefits. Therefore, the study sets out to analyse the relationship between amount, types, enjoyment of physical activity and performance in physical education with cyberbullying. (2) Methods: A sample of 867 adolescents between 12 and 19 years of age from two schools in Andalusia (Spain) was studied. A computer-based questionnaire given in the classroom was used, with two questions about the type of physical activity, one on physical education performance, the Scale of Enjoyment of Physical Activity (PACES) and the Spanish version of the European Cyberbullying Intervention Project Questionnaire (ECIPQ). (3) Results: Clear relationships were found between the practice of physical activity and cybervictimisation. However, less involvement has been observed among girls who practice physical activity in cyberaggression. (4) Conclusions: In relation to the types of physical activity, it seems that practising physical activities that involve competition can help to develop defence mechanisms against cyberaggression, as well as improve values to be less involved in cyberaggression. Full article
Article
Parental Supervision: Predictive Variables of Positive Involvement in Cyberbullying Prevention
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1562; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041562 - 07 Feb 2021
Viewed by 1305
Abstract
From an increasingly early age, parents face the challenge of educating their sons and daughters to act in the world of offline and online relationships. If for professional educators it is not proving easy, the involvement and guidance of parents in their children′s [...] Read more.
From an increasingly early age, parents face the challenge of educating their sons and daughters to act in the world of offline and online relationships. If for professional educators it is not proving easy, the involvement and guidance of parents in their children′s use of the internet seems to be a complex and unexplored challenge. This work aims to analyse the variables that influence digital education and determine a predictive model of positive parental involvement. This study was done with a representative sample consisting of five hundred and ninety-six families (596), representing the parents of children from schools with similar socio-cultural indexes. To do this, and using self-report instruments convertible into independent scales, four predictor variables were analysed: (1) parental knowledge of cyberbullying; (2) perception of parental competence in this regard; (3) parental perception of online risks; and (4) the attribution of parental responsibility in digital education. A structural equations model (SEM) examined the predictive value of these variables with respect to positive parental involvement. The structural equations model confirmed direct and mediated relationships between the independent and mediating variables on the dependent variable: parental supervision. The results indicate that positive parental involvement can be predicted from higher scores in parental knowledge of cyberbullying, perception of parental competence, risk adjustment, and attribution of parental responsibility. Full article
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Article
Mechanisms of Moral Disengagement in the Transition from Cybergossip to Cyberaggression: A Longitudinal Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 1000; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18031000 - 23 Jan 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1003
Abstract
The internet is an area where young people establish relationships and develop socially, emotionally and morally, but it also gives rise to certain forms of online behaviour, such as cybergossip, which are associated with cyberaggression and other risky behaviour. The aims of this [...] Read more.
The internet is an area where young people establish relationships and develop socially, emotionally and morally, but it also gives rise to certain forms of online behaviour, such as cybergossip, which are associated with cyberaggression and other risky behaviour. The aims of this study were to verify whether a longitudinal association exists between cybergossip and cyberaggression, and to discover which mechanisms of moral disengagement may mediate this relationship. The final sample consisted of 1392 students (50% girls; Mage = 13.47; SD = 0.77), who were surveyed in a three-wave longitudinal study at six-month intervals. The results obtained confirmed a direct, positive relationship between cybergossip, subsequent cyberaggression and the mediation exerted by cognitive restructuring in this transition. We discuss the importance of recognizing and detecting the fine distinction between online gossip and cyberaggression with the intention of doing harm, and focus on the justifications used by young people to normalize online bullying. To sum up, there is a clear need to encourage ethical, responsible behaviour in online interactions in order to achieve well-balanced, more sustainable relationships in classrooms. Full article
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