Special Issue "The Impact of Sleep Health on Chronic Diseases"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Gerard A. Kennedy
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Psychology, School of Health and Life Sciences, Federation University, Australia
Interests: sleep; sleep disorders; circadian rhythms; insomnia; sleep apnoea; diabetes; obesity; wellbeing; clinical psychology; physical activity
Dr. Russell Conduit
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3001, Australia
Interests: sleep; circadian rhythms; sleep disorders; sleep and cognition; sleep and health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are very pleased to invite you to submit research articles to a Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health that will explore “The Impact of Sleep Health on Chronic Diseases”. An increasing number of research articles have shown that various indicators of disordered sleep, such as reduced sleep duration, insufficient sleep, sleep fragmentation and hypoxia are strongly related to diabetes, hypertension and stroke, cardiovascular disease, asthma, arthritis, obesity, cognitive impairment, depression and anxiety. Most studies have acknowledged the role of obesity and mental health issues as mediators between disordered sleep and chronic diseases. However, when obesity and mental health issues are controlled for, the effects of disordered sleep on chronic diseases remain significant. The negative effects of sleep disorders can be reduced by treatments designed to improve poor sleep habits, encourage weight loss and manage sleep apnoea (continuous positive airway pressure, oral splints, surgery), and via various pharmacological treatments. Improvement of sleep quantity and quality needs to be part of the standard treatment regimen for chronic diseases. More research should be encouraged to examine the role of disordered sleep in chronic diseases and to assess the impact of treating disordered sleep on chronic diseases. 

Prof. Gerard A. Kennedy
Dr. Russell Conduit
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sleep disorders
  • Chronic disease
  • Sleep quantity
  • Sleep quality
  • Insufficient sleep
  • Obstructive sleep apnoea
  • Obesity
  • Mental health issues
  • Diabetes
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Hypertension and stroke
  • Asthma
  • Arthritis
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Depression and anxiety

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Relationship between Self-Reported Sleep Duration and Risk of Anemia: Data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2016–2017
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4721; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18094721 - 28 Apr 2021
Viewed by 634
Abstract
The importance of sleep has been gaining more and more attention nowadays. It has been widely studied that some major health issues, such as cardiovascular diseases or mortality, are closely related to the extreme ends of sleep durations. Anemia is one of the [...] Read more.
The importance of sleep has been gaining more and more attention nowadays. It has been widely studied that some major health issues, such as cardiovascular diseases or mortality, are closely related to the extreme ends of sleep durations. Anemia is one of the health problems in modern society. In this study, we aimed to find a relationship between anemia occurrence and sleep duration. Data of 11,131 Korean adults aged 19 years or older were recruited from the 2016–2017 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and analyzed in this cross-sectional study. ‘Anemia’ was defined in this study by hemoglobin level of <13 g/dL in men and <12 g/dL in women. Selected data were sorted into five groups by sleep duration: <5 h, 5 h ~ <6 h, 6 h ~ <8 h, 8 h ~ <9 h, and ≥9 h per day. We performed multivariate logistic regression analysis to assess the relationship between sleep duration and risk of anemia after adjusting for covariates including age, gender, family income level, education level, physical activity, cigarette smoking, and alcohol usage. Other factors were assessed in the analysis, such as depression, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, stroke, coronary artery disease, malignancy, stress level, and body mass index (BMI). We found that sleep duration of <5 h was related to high risk of anemia (odds ratio = 1.87; 95% confidence interval = 1.01–3.49, sleep duration of 6 h ~ <8 h as the reference group). Also, sleep duration of ≥9 h was related to lower risk of anemia in most premenopausal women after adjusting for covariates (odds ratio = 0.61; 95% confidence interval = 0.38–0.96, sleep duration of 6 h ~ < 8 h as the reference group). Male individuals with sleep durations of <5 h (odds ratio = 2.01; 95% confidence interval =1.05–3.84) and of ≥9 h (odds ratio = 2.48; 95% confidence interval =1.63–3.81) had a significantly higher risk of anemia without covariate adjustment. Postmenopausal women with sleep durations of ≥9 h had a significantly higher risk of anemia (odds ratio =2.02; 95% confidence interval =1.33–3.08) without adjusting for covariates. However, the associations became statistically insignificant after adjusting for age and covariates in both men and postmenopausal women. In conclusion, we found significant associations between extreme ends of sleep duration and risk of anemia in premenopausal Korean women. However, we did not observe strong associations between self-reported sleep duration and anemia risk in men or postmenopausal women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Impact of Sleep Health on Chronic Diseases)
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Article
Sleep Quality and Associated Factors in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Retrospective Cohort Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 3025; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18063025 - 15 Mar 2021
Viewed by 746
Abstract
Purpose: Sleep disturbance is one of the major complaints among patients with diabetes. The status of diabetes control and associated complications may contribute to sleep disturbance. This study explored night time sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness in adults with type 2 diabetes and [...] Read more.
Purpose: Sleep disturbance is one of the major complaints among patients with diabetes. The status of diabetes control and associated complications may contribute to sleep disturbance. This study explored night time sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness in adults with type 2 diabetes and examined the association of diabetes control and associated complications on their sleep quality. Methods: A retrospective cohort study design was used. Type 2 diabetic patients (87 females and 79 males, aged 63.1 ± 10.5 years) were recruited from the outpatient clinics of the endocrine department. Sleep quality was assessed by the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Diabetes control and complications were obtained by retrospectively reviewing patients’ medical records over 1 year prior to study enrollment. Results: 72.3% of recruited patients had poor glycemic control, and 71.1% had at least one diabetic complication. 56.0% of patients experienced poor sleep quality, and 24.1% had excessive daytime sleepiness. Those who were female (OR = 3.45) and who had ophthalmological problems (OR = 3.17) were associated with poor night time sleep quality, but if they did exercise to the point of sweating (OR = 0.48) reduced the risk of poor sleep quality. Furthermore, poor sleep quality (OR = 4.35) and having nephropathy (OR = 3.78) were associated with a higher risk of excessive daytime sleepiness. Conclusions: Sex, ophthalmological problems, nephropathy, and no exercise to the point of sweating are associated with sleep problems in patients with type 2 diabetes. Both lifestyle behaviors and diabetic complications affect sleep disturbances in patients with diabetes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Impact of Sleep Health on Chronic Diseases)
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