Special Issue "Clinimetric Assessment of Instruments for the Measurement of Functional Health Status in Special Populations"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Francesc Medina-Mirapeix
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physiotherapy, University of Murcia, Campus de Espinardo, 30100 Murcia, Spain
Interests: clinimetry; COPD; mobility activities
Dr. Rodrigo Martín-San Agustín
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physiotherapy, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain
Interests: clinimetry; biomedical technology; exercise prescription
Dr. Mª Piedad Sánchez-Martínez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physiotherapy, University of Murcia, Campus de Espinardo, 30100 Murcia, Spain
Interests: clinimetry; COPD; strength assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Special Issue “Clinimetric Assessment of Instruments for the Measurement of Functional Health Status in Special Populations” in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is open for submission of manuscripts. This peer-reviewed scientific journal publishes articles and communications in the area of environmental health sciences and public health, with an impact factor of 2.849. For detailed information on the journal, go to https://0-www-mdpi-com.brum.beds.ac.uk/journal/ijerph.

Clinical measurements are used daily by health professionals to assess the status of patients and thus be able to determine their evolution or the effects of an intervention. Therefore, the quality of measurement instruments must be guaranteed, and clinimetrics is the science that studies the properties of clinical tools. Some of these properties are validity, reliability, or responsiveness, among others. Moreover, the patient’s disease influences the measurement properties, so a test that has been studied for one disease does not have to show the same response in a different disease. Thus, the clinimetric study of those clinical measurements that are used for each disease in particular is important.

For this Special Issue, high-quality observational, experimental, and review studies that provide metric properties on clinical tests used in special populations such as stroke, COPD, or diabetes are invited.

Dr. Francesc Medina-Mirapeix
Dr. Rodrigo Martín-San Agustín
Dr. Mª Piedad Sánchez-Martínez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Clinimetrics
  • Validity
  • Reliability
  • Responsiveness
  • Minimal clinical important difference
  • Special populations
  • Instruments
  • Function
  • Disease

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Minimum Detectable Change of Visual Acuity Measurements Using ETDRS Charts (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study)
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 7876; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18157876 - 25 Jul 2021
Viewed by 357
Abstract
In our work, we determined the value of visual acuity (VA) with ETDRS charts (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study). The purpose of the study was to determine the measurement reliabilities, calculating the correlation coefficient interclass (ICC), the value of the error associated with [...] Read more.
In our work, we determined the value of visual acuity (VA) with ETDRS charts (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study). The purpose of the study was to determine the measurement reliabilities, calculating the correlation coefficient interclass (ICC), the value of the error associated with the measure (SEM), and the minimal detectable change (MDC). Forty healthy subjects took part. The mean age was 23.5 ± 3.1 (19 to 26) years. Visual acuities were measured with ETDRS charts (96% ETDRS chart nº 2140) and (10% SLOAN Contrast Eye Test chart nº 2153). The measurements were made (at 4 m) under four conditions: Firstly, photopic conditions with high contrast (HC) and low contrast (LC) and after 15 min of visual rest, mesopic conditions with high and low contrast. Under photopic conditions and high contrast, the ICC = 0.866 and decreased to 0.580 when the luminosity and contrast decreased. The % MDC in the four conditions was always less than 10%. It was minor under photopic conditions and HC (5.83) and maximum in mesopic conditions and LC (9.70). Our results conclude a high reliability of the ETDRS test, which is higher in photopic and high contrast conditions and lower when the luminosity and contrast decreases. Full article
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Article
Gait Speed as a Predictor for Diabetes Incidence in People with or at Risk of Knee Osteoarthritis: A Longitudinal Analysis from the Osteoarthritis Initiative
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4414; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18094414 - 21 Apr 2021
Viewed by 606
Abstract
Background: This study examined the association between baseline gait speed with incident diabetes mellitus (DM) among people with or at elevated risk for knee OA. Materials and Methods: Participants from the Osteoarthritis Initiative, aged 45 to 79 years, where included. Participants with or [...] Read more.
Background: This study examined the association between baseline gait speed with incident diabetes mellitus (DM) among people with or at elevated risk for knee OA. Materials and Methods: Participants from the Osteoarthritis Initiative, aged 45 to 79 years, where included. Participants with or at risk of knee OA from baseline to the 96-month visit were included. Participants with self-reported DM at baseline were excluded. DM incidence was followed over the 4-time points. Gait speed was measured at baseline using a 20-m walk test. Generalized estimating equations with logistic regression were utilized for analyses. Receiver operator characteristic curves and area under the curve were used to determine the cutoff score for baseline speed. Results: Of the 4313 participants included in the analyses (58.7% females), 301 participants had a cumulative incidence of DM of 7.0% during follow-up. Decreased gait speed was a significant predictor of incident DM (RR 0.44, p = 0.018). The threshold for baseline gait speed that predicted incident DM was 1.32 m/s with an area under the curve of 0.59 (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Baseline gait speed could be an important screening tool for identifying people at risk of incident diabetes, and the determined cutoff value for gait speed should be examined in future research. Full article
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Article
Responsiveness and Minimal Clinically Important Difference of the Five Times Sit-to-Stand Test in Patients with Stroke
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(5), 2314; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18052314 - 26 Feb 2021
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Abstract
This study aimed to analyze the responsiveness of the 5STS test among stroke patients and to estimate the MCIDs (minimal clinically important differences) for different severity levels of community ambulation and stages of recovery. The 5STS and comparator instruments (gait speed and Functional [...] Read more.
This study aimed to analyze the responsiveness of the 5STS test among stroke patients and to estimate the MCIDs (minimal clinically important differences) for different severity levels of community ambulation and stages of recovery. The 5STS and comparator instruments (gait speed and Functional Ambulatory Category (FAC)) were evaluated at baseline. These measures were repeated at 4 (Stage 1) and 8 weeks (Stage 2), together with the Global Rating of Change (GROC). The MCIDs were calculated with two anchor-based methods using the GROC as the external criterion. Responsiveness to change for the 5STS was estimated analyzing the correlation with changes in the two comparator instruments and their capacity to discriminate improvement. For the 5STS test, while the MCIDs of the limited community ambulators were similar in the two stages (around 3 s), those of the household ambulators decreased from 1.9 s to 0.72 s. Spearman’s rho coefficients showed an acceptable correlation between changes in 5STS and changes for both the FAC and gait speed changes in both stages of recovery. Our study revealed that the 5STS is responsive to functional changes in patients with stroke and that their degree of severity and stage of recovery influence the MCID values of the 5STS. Full article
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