Special Issue "Trends in Adolescents' and Young Adults' Substance Use since 2000"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Adolescents".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Ingeborg Margrete Rossow
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Drugs, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, 0213 Oslo, Norway
Interests: alcohol and drug epidemiology; alcohol and drug related harms; alcohol and drug policies
Dr. Elin Kristin Bye
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department Alcohol, Tobacco, and Drugs, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, 0213 Oslo, Norway
Interests: studies of trends in alcohol; tobacco and drug use among adolescents
Dr. Inger Synnøve Moan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Drugs, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, 0213 Oslo, Norway
Interests: studies of alcohol; tobacco and drug use; and social consequences of substance use

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of alcohol, tobacco, and drugs is typically initiated in adolescence, and young people’s use of these substances poses an important risk factor for poor health and social problems. Since the turn of the millennium, adolescents’ use of alcohol and cigarettes has declined in many countries, whereas trends in other aspects of substance use, including cannabis use, vaping, and drinking patterns, appear more heterogenous across countries. There is still little knowledge that explains these changes in substance use over time and how they are associated with health and social problems in young people.

For this Special Issue, we are interested in empirical studies that analyze secular trends in substance use (i.e., alcohol, tobacco, or drugs, or the combined use of two or more substances) in adolescents or young adults, as well as literature reviews and analyses of published data. The selected papers should add to the literature by widening the descriptive basis of trends in young people’s substance use, or by enhancing our understanding of how and why changes in use have occurred and how they may affect health and social wellbeing in young people, or both. Papers from low- and middle-income countries are particularly welcome.

Prof. Dr. Ingeborg Margrete Rossow
Dr. Inger Synnøve Moan
Dr. Elin Kristin Bye
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • secular trends
  • substance use
  • alcohol
  • tobacco
  • drugs
  • young people
  • explanations
  • outcomes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Normalization of Non-Drinking? Health, School Situation and Social Relations among Swedish Ninth Graders That Drink and Do Not Drink Alcohol
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(21), 11201; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph182111201 - 25 Oct 2021
Viewed by 546
Abstract
Alcohol consumption is a major contributor to the disease burden among adolescents. The adolescent alcohol abstainer is still often depicted as problematic in the research literature and in prominent theoretical frameworks. However, over the past two decades, there has been a marked trend [...] Read more.
Alcohol consumption is a major contributor to the disease burden among adolescents. The adolescent alcohol abstainer is still often depicted as problematic in the research literature and in prominent theoretical frameworks. However, over the past two decades, there has been a marked trend of declining youth drinking in Sweden. The declining trend has led to a shift in the majority behaviour of youth, from drinking to non-drinking. It is plausible that this trend has also shifted the position of non-drinkers. This paper examines the position of non-drinkers in a nationally representative sample of Swedish adolescents. A survey was carried out in 2017 in 500 randomly selected schools. A total of 5549 respondents (15–16-year-olds) agreed to participate and answered the questionnaire. A minority (42.8%) had consumed alcohol during their lifetime. The results show that non-drinkers had better health and school performance when compared to drinkers. The results also showed that there were no differences in the social position between non-drinkers and drinkers. These findings are new and indicate a changed position of non-drinkers among Swedish adolescents. With non-drinking being the majority behaviour among Swedish adolescents this seems to have shifted the position of non-drinkers. There is a need for research on the long-term importance of not drinking during adolescence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends in Adolescents' and Young Adults' Substance Use since 2000)
Article
Changes in Alcoholic Beverage Choice and Risky Drinking among Adolescents in Europe 1999–2019
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(20), 10933; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph182010933 - 18 Oct 2021
Viewed by 512
Abstract
This paper explores trends in beverage preference in adolescents, identifies related regional differences, and examines cluster differences in key drinking measures. Data were obtained from the European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs (ESPAD), covering 24 European countries between 1999 and [...] Read more.
This paper explores trends in beverage preference in adolescents, identifies related regional differences, and examines cluster differences in key drinking measures. Data were obtained from the European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs (ESPAD), covering 24 European countries between 1999 and 2019. Trends in the distribution of alcoholic beverages on the participants’ most recent drinking occasion were analysed by sex and country using fractional multinomial logit regression. Clusters of countries based on trends and predicted beverage proportions were compared regarding the prevalence of drinkers, mean alcohol volume and prevalence of heavy drinking. Four distinct clusters each among girls and boys emerged. Among girls, there was not one type of beverage that was preferred across clusters, but the proportion of cider/alcopops strongly increased over time in most clusters. Among boys, the proportion of beer decreased, but was dominant across time in all clusters. Only northern European countries formed a geographically defined region with the highest prevalence of heavy drinking and average alcohol volume in both genders. Adolescent beverage preferences are associated with mean alcohol volume and heavy drinking at a country-level. Future approaches to drinking cultures need to take subpopulations such as adolescents into account. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends in Adolescents' and Young Adults' Substance Use since 2000)
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