Special Issue "Social Support and Social Networks in Long-Term Conditions"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Rosario Fernández-Peña
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nursing, SALBIS Research Group, Nursing Research Group IDIVAL, University of Cantabria, 39008 Santander, Spain
Interests: social support; nursing;
Prof. Marí Carmen Portillo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton,Highfield Campus, SO17 1BJ, Southampton, United Kingdom
Interests: long term conditions; social support;
Prof. José Luís Molina
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: social networks; social support; transnational relations, migration and ethnicity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nowadays, the increase in life expectancy, improvements in public health and health care and the adoption of certain lifestyles have led to a dramatic increase in long term conditions. As an attempt to focus on the person and not the condition, health and social care systems have reoriented towards person-centered approaches, highlighting the importance of the individual's social environment as a key source of support and care.

The literature on social support has experienced increasing interest during the recent decades, both theoretically and empirically. Therefore, this special issue focuses on the study of social support and social networks for individuals with long term conditions and their caregivers, and seeks papers on new research aimed at (a) increasing knowledge about the role of social support and social networks in the health of individuals living with long term conditions, and (b) proposing models of care that have been or could be successful and sustainable.

From a design point of view we shall consider quantitative, qualitative, mixed methods and literature reviews in relation to the topic.

Prof. Rosario Fernández-Peña
Prof. Marí Carmen Portillo
Prof. José Luís Molina
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • social support
  • community health networks
  • chronic disease
  • community networks social care
  • social networks
  • social network analysis
  • long term conditions
  • caregivers

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
“It’s What I Have, It’s Not Who I Am”: A Qualitative Study of Social Support in Education/Employment Settings and Transition Readiness of Young Adults with End-Stage Renal Disease
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6596; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18126596 - 19 Jun 2021
Viewed by 399
Abstract
This study investigated the role of social support in self-management within education/employment settings for young adults (YA) with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) as well as barriers and facilitators to social support formation. Nineteen YA with ESRD (mean age 24 years, 10 males, 9 [...] Read more.
This study investigated the role of social support in self-management within education/employment settings for young adults (YA) with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) as well as barriers and facilitators to social support formation. Nineteen YA with ESRD (mean age 24 years, 10 males, 9 African American) recruited from a pediatric nephrology clinic in the Southeast United States completed in-person semi-structured interviews. The grounded theory was used to analyze transcribed interviews to identify emergent themes. Absences hindered participants’ school/work attendance and performance. Social support was necessary for illness management and success in academic/vocational settings. Facilitators to establishing support included self-awareness and view of disclosure as a way to access accommodations. Barriers included fear of judgment, job loss, and the belief that the condition was too personal to disclose. Educators and employers must acknowledge the needs of YA with ESRD to promote development and educational/vocational success. Fear of disclosure and poor disease self-management interferes with accessing social support. Communication skills and autonomy in patients’ medical and personal lives can promote success in education and employment settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Support and Social Networks in Long-Term Conditions)
Article
Social Support and Health Services Use in People Aged over 65 Years Migrating within China: A Cross-Sectional Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(13), 4651; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17134651 - 28 Jun 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 786
Abstract
Background: Due to the household registration system, Chinese elderly migrants have insufficient access to health services and social support. Thus, this study examined the use of health services, the access to social support, and the interaction among the elderly migrating within China. Methods: [...] Read more.
Background: Due to the household registration system, Chinese elderly migrants have insufficient access to health services and social support. Thus, this study examined the use of health services, the access to social support, and the interaction among the elderly migrating within China. Methods: Data were obtained from the China Migrant Dynamic Monitoring Survey in 2015, adopting probability proportionate to size as the sampling strategy. Structural equation modeling and mediating effect tests were employed to explore the associations. Results: Approximately 45.9% of elderly migrants did not seek health services when needed. The use of outpatient and inpatient services was more common than free essential public health services. The use of health services was negatively associated with migrating duration and migrating for offspring, while it was positively associated with outer social support. The mediating effects of outer social support were discovered on the relationships between the use of health services and independent variables such as migrating duration and migrating for offspring, respectively. Conclusion: Elderly migrants with a longer migrating duration or migrated for offspring seem to obtain less outer social support, resulting in a decreased use of health services. Outer social support was suggested as a key effort to improve the equalization of health services in Chinese elderly migrants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Support and Social Networks in Long-Term Conditions)
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