Special Issue "To Be Healthy for the Elderly: Long Term Care Issues around the World"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Juh Hyun Shin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Nursing , Ewha Womans University, Seoul 152650, Korea
Interests: nursing home; geriatric nursing; gerontological care; elderly care; long-term care; assisted living; staffing; caregiver; dementia

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is my great pleasure to serve as a guest editor for this Special Issue of IJERPH. There are numerous issues that must be addressed in healthcare around the world—among them, concerns about the quality of life of the elderly who stay in long-term care settings such as nursing homes, assisted living, and geriatric hospitals, both in the public and private sectors, especially due to the shortage of healthcare workers and high staff turnover rate in many countries. Even worse, the elderly in long-term care settings are one of the most vulnerable populations that have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

This Special Issue of IJERPH focuses on research related to issues linked to the elderly and how to improve their quality of care. This may include interventions to improve quality of care, challenges related to COVID-19 and how to overcome it, staffing issues, policies, regulations, resident-centered care, dementia, culture change, burdens of caregivers, and economic analysis of expenses.

In this Special Issue, we invite researchers from the fields of medicine, nursing, public health, management, architecture, social work, occupational therapy, physical therapy, health economics, and other social sciences to submit high-quality empirical papers or systematical reviews related to the issues in this research area.

Prof. Dr. Juh Hyun Shin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nursing
  • Public health
  • Quality of care
  • Healthy aging
  • Elderly care

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Research

Article
Perceptions Related to Nursing and Nursing Staff in Long-Term Care Settings during the COVID-19 Pandemic Era: Using Social Networking Service
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7398; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147398 - 11 Jul 2021
Viewed by 396
Abstract
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate what opinions and perceptions people have about nursing and the role of nursing staff in nursing homes (NHs) on Social Networking Service (SNS) by analyzing large-scale data through social big-data analysis. Methods: This study [...] Read more.
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate what opinions and perceptions people have about nursing and the role of nursing staff in nursing homes (NHs) on Social Networking Service (SNS) by analyzing large-scale data through social big-data analysis. Methods: This study investigated changes in perception related to nursing and nursing staff in NHs during the COVID-19 pandemic era using target channels (blogs, cafes, Instagram, communities, Twitter, etc.). Data were collected on the channel from 12 September 2019 to 11 September 2020, 6 months before and after 12 March 2020 when the COVID-19 pandemic was declared. Selected keywords included “nursing,” “nurse,” and “nursing staff,” and included words were “long-term care settings,” “geriatric hospital,” and “nursing home.” Text mining, opinion mining, and social network analysis were conducted. Results: After the COVID-19 pandemic, the frequency of keywords increased about 1.5 times compared to before. In March 2020 when the COVID-19 pandemic was declared, the negative phrase “be infected” ranked number one, resulting in a sharp 8% rise in the percentage of negative words in that month. The related words that have risen in rank significantly, or were newly ranked in the Top 30 after the pandemic, were related with COVID-19. Conclusion: The public began to realize the role of nursing staff in the prevention and management of mass infection in NHs and the importance of nursing staff after the pandemic. Further studies should examine the perceptions of those who have received nursing services and include a wide range of foreign channels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue To Be Healthy for the Elderly: Long Term Care Issues around the World)
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Article
Effects of a Web-Based Educational Program Regarding Physical Restraint Reduction in Long-Term Care Settings on Nursing Students: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 6698; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18136698 - 22 Jun 2021
Viewed by 344
Abstract
Physical restraint is still frequently used in many countries. However, a lack of education hinders physical restraint reduction in long-term care facilities. No study has yet to examine the effects of physical restraint reduction education on nursing students. This study aimed to evaluate [...] Read more.
Physical restraint is still frequently used in many countries. However, a lack of education hinders physical restraint reduction in long-term care facilities. No study has yet to examine the effects of physical restraint reduction education on nursing students. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a web-based educational program of physical restraint reduction on nursing students’ knowledge and perceptions. A cluster randomized controlled and single-blind design was used. This study was conducted at four nursing schools in South Korea. A total of 169 undergraduate nursing students completed this study. Using random allocation, two nursing schools (85 students) were allocated as the experimental group and the other two schools (84 students) as the control group. The experimental group received the web-based educational program, and the control group did not receive the educational program. Data were collected immediately before and after the web-based educational program. The experimental group’s knowledge and perceptions significantly improved between pre-test and post-test. The analysis of covariance showed statistically significant differences between groups in knowledge (p < 0.001) and perceptions (p < 0.001) over time, revealing positive effects of the web-based educational program. The web-based educational program regarding physical restraint reduction positively affected nursing students’ knowledge and perceptions. Future studies are required to examine the educational program’s longitudinal effects with more rigorous measurements and research methods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue To Be Healthy for the Elderly: Long Term Care Issues around the World)
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Article
The Health Behaviour of German Outpatient Caregivers in Relation to Their Working Conditions: A Qualitative Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5942; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115942 - 01 Jun 2021
Viewed by 720
Abstract
Ongoing demographic change is leading to an increasingly older society and a rising proportion of people in need of care in the German population. Therefore, the professional group of outpatient caregivers is highly relevant. Their work is characterised not only by interacting with [...] Read more.
Ongoing demographic change is leading to an increasingly older society and a rising proportion of people in need of care in the German population. Therefore, the professional group of outpatient caregivers is highly relevant. Their work is characterised not only by interacting with patients in a mobile setting but also by working in shifts. Health behaviour under these specific working conditions is crucial for ensuring long-term work ability and performance. Little is known about the health behaviour of German outpatient caregivers and its potential impact on their work. The aims of the study were (1) to examine health behavioural patterns (nutrition, exercise, smoking, regeneration) of outpatient caregivers, (2) to illuminate their personal health-promoting behaviours, and (3) to identify potential work-related factors influencing their health behaviour. Fifteen problem-centred interviews were conducted with outpatient caregivers working in Northern Germany in the period January–April 2020. Interviews were analysed by using qualitative content analysis. Outpatient caregivers reported improvable nutrition and hydration, with simultaneous high coffee consumption, low physical activity, poor regeneration (breaks and sleep quality), and good personal health-promoting behaviour (e.g., back-friendly habits), although the majority were smokers. Barriers to the implementation of health-promoting behaviours were a high perception of stress due to increased workload and time pressure, while aids to better health-promoting behaviour were described as being social support and personal resources. The respondents perceived their working conditions as potentially influencing their health behaviour. On the basis of their descriptions, various practice-relevant strategies were derived. The data explore a potential need for outpatient care services to develop interventions on behavioural and structural levels that can help create healthier working conditions for their employees so these caregivers can adopt better health behaviours. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue To Be Healthy for the Elderly: Long Term Care Issues around the World)
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Article
Person-Centered Care Practice, Patient Safety Competence, and Patient Safety Nursing Activities of Nurses Working in Geriatric Hospitals
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(10), 5169; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18105169 - 13 May 2021
Viewed by 576
Abstract
Geriatric nursing activities are closely related to patient safety; therefore, nurses’ efforts to improve patient safety in geriatric hospitals are important. In the present study, we investigated the relationships between person-centered care practice, patient safety competence, and patient safety during nursing activities in [...] Read more.
Geriatric nursing activities are closely related to patient safety; therefore, nurses’ efforts to improve patient safety in geriatric hospitals are important. In the present study, we investigated the relationships between person-centered care practice, patient safety competence, and patient safety during nursing activities in geriatric hospitals. We used the following tools to investigate the factors affecting patient safety during nursing activities: (a) the Korean version of the Person-Centered Care Assessment Tool (P-CAT), (b) the Patient Safety Competence Assessment Tool for Nurses, and (c) the Patient Safety Nursing Activities Assessment Tool for geriatric nurses. The questionnaire survey was completed by 186 geriatric nurses in 12 geriatric hospitals from 1 August to 31 August 2018. We analyzed the survey data using a t-test, one-way ANOVA, Pearson’s correlation coefficient, and multiple regression. We identified patient safety skills (β = 0.417, p < 0.001) and age (β = 0.209, p = 0.035) as key factors that influence patient safety during nursing activities. Therefore, to improve the quality of patient safety during nursing activities conducted by geriatric nurses, it is necessary to develop strategies to improve patient safety skills and expand the pool of competent nurses with clinical experience. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue To Be Healthy for the Elderly: Long Term Care Issues around the World)
Article
Factors Influencing Oral Health-Related Quality of Life in Older Adults in Rural Areas: Oral Dryness and Oral Health Knowledge and Behavior
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 4295; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18084295 - 18 Apr 2021
Viewed by 626
Abstract
The oral health of older adults is an important factor affecting their overall health and quality of life. This study aimed to identify the characteristics of oral health of older adults living at home in rural areas and investigate factors affecting oral health-related [...] Read more.
The oral health of older adults is an important factor affecting their overall health and quality of life. This study aimed to identify the characteristics of oral health of older adults living at home in rural areas and investigate factors affecting oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL), especially oral dryness and oral health knowledge and behavior. A descriptive correlational study was conducted. In total, 117 participants were included in the final analysis. Data were collected using questionnaires for oral dryness, oral health knowledge and behavior, and OHRQoL. In addition, oral dryness was measured by mechanical measurements. Oral health knowledge was positively correlated with oral health behavior (r = 0.18, p = 0.029) and OHRQoL (r = 0.25, p = 0.003). In addition, a positive correlation between oral health behavior and OHRQoL (r = 0.24, p = 0.005) was observed. Multiple regression analysis revealed that subjective oral dryness (β = −4.99, p = 0.001) had a significant effect on OHRQoL. To improve OHRQoL in the rural elderly, health providers should pay attention to oral dryness and comprehensively evaluate it. The development of prevention programs and continuous education that can improve oral health knowledge and behavior is also required. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue To Be Healthy for the Elderly: Long Term Care Issues around the World)
Article
Health Promotion Behavior among Older Korean Family Caregivers of People with Dementia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 4123; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18084123 - 13 Apr 2021
Viewed by 611
Abstract
People adopt health promotion behaviors to promote their health as they interact within the environment. The purpose of this study was to examine factors influencing health promotion behaviors among older adults caring for family members with dementia. For this cross-sectional study, data from [...] Read more.
People adopt health promotion behaviors to promote their health as they interact within the environment. The purpose of this study was to examine factors influencing health promotion behaviors among older adults caring for family members with dementia. For this cross-sectional study, data from 135 older adults who were the main caregivers were collected at an outpatient clinic at a university hospital in the capital city of South Korea between September and October in 2020. Sociodemographic characteristics, caregiver-related characteristics, dementia knowledge, fear of dementia, and health promotion behaviors were measured. Univariate analysis revealed that the level of health promotion behaviors differed by age, sex, educational level, monthly income, relationship with the family member with dementia, and cohabitation with family members with dementia. In the multivariate analysis, a hierarchical multiple regression model explained 33.9% of the variance. Sex, duration of caregiving, use of long-term care service, and fear of dementia predicted health promotion behavior. A strategic tailored care plan for target population is needed to improve the health promotion behavior of older adults caring for family members with dementia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue To Be Healthy for the Elderly: Long Term Care Issues around the World)
Article
Quality of Gerontological Nursing and Ageism: What Factors Influence on Nurses’ Ageism in South Korea?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 4091; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18084091 - 13 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 556
Abstract
With the aging of the population, age-related problems are emerging, which has caused age discrimination. Particularly, most nurses care for a large number of old patients in the clinical setting. Nurses’ attitude toward the clients has a significant effect on the quality of [...] Read more.
With the aging of the population, age-related problems are emerging, which has caused age discrimination. Particularly, most nurses care for a large number of old patients in the clinical setting. Nurses’ attitude toward the clients has a significant effect on the quality of nursing, so it is time to identify their perspective to the aged. The quality of nursing could greatly depend on who provides and how to provide care. If older patients meet nursing staff with an ageist perspective, whether intentionally or unintentionally, they experience negative attitudes toward them during served health care, and trust cannot be formed, resulting in a deterioration in the quality of medical services. This study aimed to identify factors influencing nurses’ ageism attitudes. A total of 162 general hospital nurses completed a questionnaire consisting of the Wong and Law Emotional Intelligence Scale (WLEIS), the Contact with Elderly People (CEP), the Anxiety about Aging Scale (AAS), and the Fraboni Scale of Ageism (FSA). Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, t-test, one-way ANOVA, Scheffé post hoc, Pearson’s correlation coefficients, and stepwise multiple regression using SPSS/WIN 26.0 program. The average score of FSA was 2.63 ± 0.36 (range 1–4); FSA showed a statistical difference according to cohabitation with an old adult in the past (t = 2.42, p = 0.017). Factors influencing FSA were the fear of old people (β = 0.34, p < 0.001) and fear of loss (β = 0.28, p < 0.001) of the AAS; and these variables explained 21.1% of FSA (F = 22.56, p < 0.001). Based on these results, the development and application of nursing education focused on intergenerational contact is needed in order to reduce the anxiety about aging and to acquire a high quality of gerontological nursing with a reduction of ageism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue To Be Healthy for the Elderly: Long Term Care Issues around the World)
Article
Identifying the Risk Factors Associated with Nursing Home Residents’ Pressure Ulcers Using Machine Learning Methods
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 2954; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18062954 - 13 Mar 2021
Viewed by 884
Abstract
Background: Machine learning (ML) can keep improving predictions and generating automated knowledge via data-driven predictors or decisions. Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare different ML methods including random forest, logistics regression, linear support vector machine (SVM), polynomial SVM, radial SVM, [...] Read more.
Background: Machine learning (ML) can keep improving predictions and generating automated knowledge via data-driven predictors or decisions. Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare different ML methods including random forest, logistics regression, linear support vector machine (SVM), polynomial SVM, radial SVM, and sigmoid SVM in terms of their accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, negative predictor values, and positive predictive values by validating real datasets to predict factors for pressure ulcers (PUs). Methods: We applied representative ML algorithms (random forest, logistic regression, linear SVM, polynomial SVM, radial SVM, and sigmoid SVM) to develop a prediction model (N = 60). Results: The random forest model showed the greatest accuracy (0.814), followed by logistic regression (0.782), polynomial SVM (0.779), radial SVM (0.770), linear SVM (0.767), and sigmoid SVM (0.674). Conclusions: The random forest model showed the greatest accuracy for predicting PUs in nursing homes (NHs). Diverse factors that predict PUs in NHs including NH characteristics and residents’ characteristics were identified according to diverse ML methods. These factors should be considered to decrease PUs in NH residents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue To Be Healthy for the Elderly: Long Term Care Issues around the World)
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Article
Factors Influencing the Dementia-Preventive Behaviors among Middle-Aged Persons with Chronic Diseases in Korea
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 2936; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18062936 - 13 Mar 2021
Viewed by 646
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of dementia literacy, internal health locus of control, and fear of dementia on dementia-preventive behaviors among middle-aged people with chronic diseases. The participants were middle-aged individuals with chronic diseases who had been taking [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of dementia literacy, internal health locus of control, and fear of dementia on dementia-preventive behaviors among middle-aged people with chronic diseases. The participants were middle-aged individuals with chronic diseases who had been taking medications for at least three months, recruited using convenience sampling. A total of 123 participants were recruited between 13 and 31 March 2020, using self-reported questionnaires. Data were then analyzed through independent t-test, one-way ANOVA, Pearson’s correlation coefficient, and multiple linear regression using the SPSS/WIN 25.0. The results showed that health condition perceived as healthy and dementia literacy were the leading factors influencing dementia-preventive behaviors. These variables showed a 16% explanatory power for dementia-preventive behaviors. Therefore, when the participants’ perceived health condition was healthy and the dementia literacy score was higher, the level of dementia-preventive behaviors was also higher. It is necessary to develop educational programs to increase dementia literacy as a major variable in dementia-preventive behaviors, and further research on its efficacy should be conducted. When providing dementia-preventive education programs to middle-aged people who have been exposed to chronic diseases, it is necessary to consider their level of perceived health condition and dementia literacy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue To Be Healthy for the Elderly: Long Term Care Issues around the World)
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