Special Issue "Social Vulnerability and Health Care: Analysis and Intervention"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Public Health Statistics and Risk Assessment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Stefano Pagano
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Surgical and Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy
Interests: epidemiology; dental materials; children; public dentistry
Prof. Dr. Elena Stanghellini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Economy, Finance and Statistics, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy
Interests: economy; statistics; public health
Dr. Michele Nardone
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Azienda Socio-Sanitaria Territoriale, Melegnano e della Martesana, Milano, Italy
Interests: public health; statistics; epidemiology
Dr. Guido Lombardo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Surgical and Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy
Interests: pediatric dentistry; epidemiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The great socio-economic inequalities present in the world fragment the social fabric into groups of populations with extremely uneven life expectations. The lower-income groups and those with poor socio-cultural integration with the general population show a greater social vulnerability. By social vulnerability is meant a condition of uncertainty of life, with different degrees of economic and social hardship, which affects all age groups, reflecting on the health status of the individual. In other words, vulnerable individuals have a reduced probability of maintaining their general state of health and, when sick, a reduced possibility of accessing treatment due to a whole series of social and economic barriers. When physical disability is added to socio-economic barriers, the picture of “social inequity” becomes even greater. Vulnerability is primarily a social policy problem, and only after that can it be considered as a health problem. Therefore, the solution to the problem is twofold: socio-cultural and health.

The goal of this Special Issue is to classify vulnerabilities and identify appropriate socio-health intervention strategies that are not limited to the medical sciences. Works related to the epidemiology, prevention, and treatment of pathologies related to socio-health vulnerability are welcome.

Submissions could take various forms, including prospective studies; retrospective data analyses; meta-analytic, systematic, or narrative reviews; topical reviews; or commentaries.

Dr. Stefano Pagano
Prof. Dr. Elena Stanghellini
Dr. Michele Nardone
Dr. Guido Lombardo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • social health
  • vulnerability
  • public health
  • resilience

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Household Food Insecurity: Comparison between Families with and without Members with Disabilities
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6149; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17176149 - 24 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 758
Abstract
Although the high rate of food insecurity among people with disabilities and their households has emerged as an important concern in public health and nutrition policy, the available data on these issues are still too limited to fully understand this phenomenon. This study [...] Read more.
Although the high rate of food insecurity among people with disabilities and their households has emerged as an important concern in public health and nutrition policy, the available data on these issues are still too limited to fully understand this phenomenon. This study aimed to compare the prevalence of food insecurity between households with and without persons with disabilities and to explore which sociodemographic and disability characteristics are associated with household food insecurity among households with members with disabilities. The data of 2690 households with and without members with disabilities from the 2013 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed. Household food insecurity was more prevalent among households including persons with disabilities than among those without such members. The likelihood of experiencing food insecurity was especially high in households having a female head with a disability (odds ratio (OR) = 1.98); working-age adults with disabilities (OR = 1.70); members with disabilities who were not economically active (OR = 1.53); and members with mental disabilities (OR = 2.81), disabilities involving internal organs (OR = 4.38), or severe (grades 1–3) disabilities (OR = 1.73). The findings indicate that the disability status and sociodemographic characteristics of disabled family members are closely associated with household food security status. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Vulnerability and Health Care: Analysis and Intervention)
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