Special Issue "Well-Being and Quality of Life in the Elderly"

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Laura Galiana
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Methodology for the Behavioral Sciences, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain
Interests: elderly; palliative care; healthcare professionals; psychometrics
Prof. José Manuel Tomás Miguel
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Methodology for the Behavioral Sciences, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain
Interests: elderly; structural equation modelling; health; organizational psychology
Prof. Amparo Oliver
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Methodology for the Behavioral Sciences, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain
Interests: elderly; statistics; well-being; gender studies
Dr. Patrícia Sancho
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Developmental Psychology and Education, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain
Interests: elderly; developmental psychology; quality of life; healthy aging

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Around the world, the elderly population is rapidly growing. Recent advances in science have extended longevity, being this increase in life expectancy one of the main challenges we are facing in the 21st century. Our efforts are now focused on accompanying this extension of life with well-being and quality of life in order to achieve successful and healthy aging. This Special Issue focuses on well-being and quality of life in the elderly. We welcome contributions based on predictive models of well-being and quality of life in older people, interventions to improve older people’s quality of life and well-being, or systematic reviews summarizing the most important findings to date. We hope to receive manuscripts (original research papers, review articles, case studies, and opinion papers) from different geographical, cultural, and economic settings.
We invite the submission of manuscripts describing qualitative or quantitative research in areas such as eHealth, active aging, physical activity, self-care, social support, spirituality and religion, frailty, health services, and pharmaceutical care and polymedication.

Dr. Laura Galiana
Prof. José Manuel Tomás Miguel
Prof. Amparo Oliver
Dr. Patrícia Sancho
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • older adults
  • health
  • successful aging
  • well-being
  • quality of life
  • self-care
  • frailty
  • spirituality

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Do Age-Friendly Rural Communities Affect Quality of Life? A Comparison of Perceptions from Middle-Aged and Older Adults in China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7283; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147283 - 07 Jul 2021
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Abstract
The aging population in rural areas of China faces serious challenges due to urban–rural disparities. In order to improve the active aging of rural older adults, the establishment of age-friendly communities is encouraged. However, globally, the focus is on age-friendly communities in urban [...] Read more.
The aging population in rural areas of China faces serious challenges due to urban–rural disparities. In order to improve the active aging of rural older adults, the establishment of age-friendly communities is encouraged. However, globally, the focus is on age-friendly communities in urban areas, not reflecting rural communities. Hence, we addressed the importance of age-friendly rural communities (AFRCs) and aimed to investigate their impact on the quality of life (QoL) of older adults. We examined different perceptions of AFRCs among older adults (aged over 60) and middle-aged people (45–60) in rural communities with questionnaire surveys (n = 470 and 393, respectively). Several statistical methods, such as Chi-squared test, t-test, reliability test, and multiple regression, were adopted to investigate and compare the perceptions of these two. The results indicated that (1) middle-aged people were more satisfied with AFRC components and had a higher QoL than older adults; (2) the QoL of middle-aged people was predicted by housing, accessibility, and outdoor spaces; (3) the QoL of older adults was affected by housing, outdoor spaces, social participation, and public transportation. These findings aid in our understanding of rural communities and the QoL of rural residents. They are helpful for urban planners and policymakers to improve the planning of AFRCs and supplement research on age-friendly communities in rural areas. Practical implementations are proposed for the planning of AFRCs, such as the passive design of residential housing, grouping of community facilities together, and improvement in the hygiene of outdoor spaces in rural areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Well-Being and Quality of Life in the Elderly)
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Article
Health Education as a Means of Addressing Death in the Elderly
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6652; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18126652 - 21 Jun 2021
Viewed by 349
Abstract
Education for death is an emerging field of study in which health education research and proposals are increasingly being made with the aim of acquiring knowledge and skills to promote positive attitudes towards health and preparation for the end of life. The aim [...] Read more.
Education for death is an emerging field of study in which health education research and proposals are increasingly being made with the aim of acquiring knowledge and skills to promote positive attitudes towards health and preparation for the end of life. The aim of this study is to find out what experience older people have had with death education and the importance they give to health education. A qualitative methodological design was selected using a semi-structured interview. The survey consisted of interviews with 28 participants from the city of Granada (Spain) aged 61 to 78. This qualitative-descriptive study is based on an analysis of older people’s experience of education and preparation for death throughout their lives. The results show that, in most cases, the only information received was in childhood and always from a religious perspective. Death and health are closely related, so working on death education helps to improve the quality of life of elderly people. Health education offers ways of coping with the end of life through the transmission of values and practices that make it possible to anticipate and resolve situations of instability or anxiety. Facing death naturally and as just another part of life will help to make healthy ageing possible, through educational proposals related to the integral health of elderly people. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Well-Being and Quality of Life in the Elderly)
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Article
Sense of Coherence and Quality of Life in Patients Treated with Antivitamin K Oral Anticoagulants: A Cross-Sectional Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1668; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041668 - 09 Feb 2021
Viewed by 668
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between the participants’ self-reported quality of life and their sense of coherence in a sample (n = 85) of patients on treatment with oral antivitamin K anticoagulants. A cross-sectional design was used. [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between the participants’ self-reported quality of life and their sense of coherence in a sample (n = 85) of patients on treatment with oral antivitamin K anticoagulants. A cross-sectional design was used. The measurement instruments included a questionnaire on sociodemographic variables, the Spanish version of the Abbreviated World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF), an oral-anticoagulant-treatment-specific quality-of-life questionnaire, and the sense-of-coherence (SOC) scale. We analyzed the correlations between the participants’ characteristics and the results from the quality-of-life and SOC scales. Age, level of education, employment status, living arrangement, and treatment length were the determinants of the quality of life in people treated with oral anticoagulants. We found a significant association between the four domains of the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire and general treatment satisfaction (p < 0.01); no significant correlations were found between the SOC subscales and the oral-anticoagulant-treatment-specific quality of life in our sample. Women had a worse level of self-management than men. Nursing interventions should be tailored to the needs of the populations on treatment with oral anticoagulants in order to facilitate a higher level of self-management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Well-Being and Quality of Life in the Elderly)
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