Special Issue "Application of GIS-Based Mapping of Local Climate Zones in Urban Areas"

A special issue of ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information (ISSN 2220-9964).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Michal Lehnert
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Palacký University Olomouc, Faculty of Science, Department of Geography, 771 46 Olomouc, Czech Republic
Interests: urban climate; local climate zones; human thermal environment; climate change; soil temperature
Dr. Jan Geletič
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Computer Science of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Department of Complex Systems, 182 07 Prague 8, Czech Republic
Interests: urban climate; microclimate; local climate zones; remote sensing; computer modeling
Dr. Stevan Savić
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Sciences, Climatology and Hydrology Research Centre, Serbia
Interests: urban climate; urban heat island; classification of urban surface; urban biometeorology; urban environment; urban climate and public health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The concept of local climatic zones (LCZs) has become a widely recognized standard for the description of urban climate sites and has gained substantial attention from scholars worldwide over recent years. The original concept was extended to the mapping method of urban and suburban landscape, resulting in widespread application in urban climate research and beyond. With such a radical shift in the LCZ concept, new problems were identified (e.g., the quality and level of detail of GIS data, user accuracy, appropriate resolution, spatiotemporal variability, level of generalization, and standardization of the classification). Most popular among the authors dealing with LCZ delineation are methods based on widely available remote sensing data. The majority of such studies, however, have reported user accuracy inappropriate for recent urban climate science, demanding exact data for modeling as well as for application in real urban planning. We therefore have devoted this Special Issue to GIS-based methods of LCZ delineation and their application to endorse the development of high-quality LCZ data. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

- Innovative GIS-based LCZ mapping methods;
- Analyses on producer and user accuracy for GIS-based and other methods;
- Studies on spatiotemporal variability of thermal exposure in LCZs;
- Application of LCZ concept in urban areas

Dr. Michal Lehnert
Dr. Jan Geletič
Dr. Stevan Savić
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • local climate zone
  • urban climate
  • urban heat island
  • thermal exposure
  • urban planning
  • geographic information system
  • urban landscape
  • land use/cover

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Comparison of Ecohydrological and Climatological Zoning of the Cities: Case Study of the City of Pilsen
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2021, 10(5), 350; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi10050350 - 19 May 2021
Viewed by 315
Abstract
Standardized delimiting of local climate zones (LCZ) will be better applicable to the urban adaptation to climate change when the ecohydrological properties of LCZ units are known. Therefore, the properties of LCZ units based on the methodology of ecohydrological zoning of the urban [...] Read more.
Standardized delimiting of local climate zones (LCZ) will be better applicable to the urban adaptation to climate change when the ecohydrological properties of LCZ units are known. Therefore, the properties of LCZ units based on the methodology of ecohydrological zoning of the urban landscape, which was created in GIS as a basis for planning blue-green infrastructure of cities in the Czech Republic, are presented in the paper. The goal of this study is to compare approaches and results of our own ecohydrological zonation and standardized LCZ delimiting in the city of Pilsen. Both methodological approaches differ in input data, resolution details and parameters used. The results showed that the areas of the individual LCZ classes show different levels of ecohydrological qualities. Internal heterogeneity of LCZ classes demonstrated by variance of ecohydrological parameters’ values can be partly explained by different techniques and data sources for delimitation of both zonations, but by different sets of delimitation criteria. The discussion is held on the importance of terrain slope for supplementing the LCZ classification. A case study can be a stimulus for further development of holistic urban zoning methodologies that would take into account both climatological and ecohydrological conditions. Full article
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Review

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Review
Mapping Local Climate Zones and Their Applications in European Urban Environments: A Systematic Literature Review and Future Development Trends
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2021, 10(4), 260; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi10040260 - 12 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 612
Abstract
In the light of climate change and burgeoning urbanization, heat loads in urban areas have emerged as serious issues, affecting the well-being of the population and the environment. In response to a pressing need for more standardised and communicable research into urban climate, [...] Read more.
In the light of climate change and burgeoning urbanization, heat loads in urban areas have emerged as serious issues, affecting the well-being of the population and the environment. In response to a pressing need for more standardised and communicable research into urban climate, the concept of local climate zones (LCZs) has been created. This concept aims to define the morphological types of (urban) surface with respect to the formation of local climatic conditions, largely thermal. This systematic review paper analyses studies that have applied the concept of LCZs to European urban areas. The methodology utilized pre-determined keywords and five steps of literature selection. A total of 91 studies were found eligible for analysis. The results show that the concept of LCZs has been increasingly employed and become well established in European urban climate research. Dozens of measurements, satellite observations, and modelling outcomes have demonstrated the characteristic thermal responses of LCZs in European cities. However, a substantial number of the studies have concentrated on the methodological development of the classification process, generating a degree of inconsistency in the delineation of LCZs. Recent trends indicate an increasing prevalence of the accessible remote-sensing based approach over accurate GIS-based methods in the delineation of LCZs. In this context, applications of the concept in fine-scale modelling appear limited. Nevertheless, the concept of the LCZ has proven appropriate and valuable to the provision of metadata for urban stations, (surface) urban heat island analysis, and the assessment of outdoor thermal comfort and heat risk. Any further development of LCZ mapping appears to require a standardised objective approach that may be globally applicable. Full article
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