Special Issue "Cultural Heritage Mapping and Observation"

A special issue of ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information (ISSN 2220-9964).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 October 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Andreas Georgopoulos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Technical University of Athens, Laboratory of Photogrammetry, Athens, Greece
Interests: Photogrammetry; Cultural heritage; Monitoring camera calibration; Digital orthophotography

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cultural Heritage and Humanities in general have always cautiously exploited technological advances. In the last 10 or 15 years, the rapid progress of the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) has provided numerous tools which have enabled us to change traditional Cultural Heritage practice. Satellite, aerial, and terrestrial digital sensors give the opportunity to archaeologists and conservation experts to completely change their everyday practice. This has happened in all stages, from archaeological research to documenting archaeological excavations and managing monuments and artefacts.

Archaeological prospection, LiDAR point cloud processing, aerial imagery, and satellite remote sensing assist in locating, observing, and mapping Cultural Heritage sites at small scales. On the other hand, aerial UAV photography from low altitudes, terrestrial imagery, and laser scanning supported by classical surveying techniques enable mapping of Cultural Heritage at large scales. In this Special Issue, papers highlighting innovations and interesting implementations of contemporary technologies on the above broad areas are welcome. In this effort, we would like to promote internationality, capacity building, interdisciplinarity, innovative methods, and interesting applications on Cultural Heritage assets, be they tangible or intangible, large or small.

Innovations may concern areas such as 3D reconstructions, virtual reality, digital documentation of archaeological excavations, archaeological prospections, cultural heritage management systems, and digital data processing.

Prof. Andreas Georgopoulos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ICT
  • digital sensors
  • archaeological prospection
  • non-destructive techniques
  • image-based modeling
  • 3D laser scanning
  • 3D models
  • CH management

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Edge Detection in 3D Point Clouds Using Digital Images
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2021, 10(4), 229; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi10040229 - 06 Apr 2021
Viewed by 470
Abstract
This paper presents an effective and semi-automated method for detecting 3D edges in 3D point clouds with the help of high-resolution digital images. The effort aims to contribute towards addressing the unsolved problem of automated production of vector drawings from 3D point clouds [...] Read more.
This paper presents an effective and semi-automated method for detecting 3D edges in 3D point clouds with the help of high-resolution digital images. The effort aims to contribute towards addressing the unsolved problem of automated production of vector drawings from 3D point clouds of cultural heritage objects. Edges are the simplest primitives to detect in an unorganized point cloud and an algorithm was developed to perform this task. The provided edges are defined and measured on 2D digital images of known orientation, and the algorithm determines the plane defined by the edge on the image and its perspective center. This is accomplished by applying suitable transformations to the image coordinates of the edge points based on the Analytical Geometry relationships and properties of planes in 3D space. This plane inevitably contains the 3D points of the edge in the point cloud. The algorithm then detects and isolates those points which define the edge in the world system. Finally, the goal is to reliably locate the points that describe the desired edge in their true position in the geodetic space, using several constraints. The algorithm is firstly investigated theoretically for its efficiency using simulation data and then assessed under real conditions and under different image orientations and lengths of the edge on the image. The results are presented and evaluated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage Mapping and Observation)
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Article
The Mosque-Cathedral of Cordoba: Graphic Analysis of Interior Perspectives by Girault de Prangey around 1839
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2021, 10(3), 181; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi10030181 - 19 Mar 2021
Viewed by 952
Abstract
The work of Philibert Girault de Prangey, who was a draughtsman, pioneering photographer and an Islamic architecture scholar, has been the subject of recent exhibitions in his hometown (Langres, 2019), at the Metropolitan Museum (New York, 2019) and at the Musée d’Orsay (Paris, [...] Read more.
The work of Philibert Girault de Prangey, who was a draughtsman, pioneering photographer and an Islamic architecture scholar, has been the subject of recent exhibitions in his hometown (Langres, 2019), at the Metropolitan Museum (New York, 2019) and at the Musée d’Orsay (Paris, 2020). After visiting Andalusia between 1832 and 1833, Prangey completed the publication “Monuments arabes et moresques de Cordoue, Seville et Grenada” in 1839, based on his own drawings and measurements. For the first time, this research analyses his interior perspectives of the Mosque-Cathedral of Cordoba (Spain). The novel methodology is based on its comparison with a digital model derived from the point cloud captured by a 3D laser scanner. After locating the different viewpoints, the geometric precision and the elaboration process are analysed, taking into account historic images by various authors, other details published by Prangey and the architectural transformations of the building. In this way, the veracity and documentary interest of some beautiful perspectives of a monument inscribed on the World Heritage List by UNESCO is valued. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage Mapping and Observation)
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Article
The Potential of LiDAR and UAV-Photogrammetric Data Analysis to Interpret Archaeological Sites: A Case Study of Chun Castle in South-West England
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2021, 10(1), 41; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi10010041 - 19 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1055
Abstract
With the increasing demands to use remote sensing approaches, such as aerial photography, satellite imagery, and LiDAR in archaeological applications, there is still a limited number of studies assessing the differences between remote sensing methods in extracting new archaeological finds. Therefore, this work [...] Read more.
With the increasing demands to use remote sensing approaches, such as aerial photography, satellite imagery, and LiDAR in archaeological applications, there is still a limited number of studies assessing the differences between remote sensing methods in extracting new archaeological finds. Therefore, this work aims to critically compare two types of fine-scale remotely sensed data: LiDAR and an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) derived Structure from Motion (SfM) photogrammetry. To achieve this, aerial imagery and airborne LiDAR datasets of Chun Castle were acquired, processed, analyzed, and interpreted. Chun Castle is one of the most remarkable ancient sites in Cornwall County (Southwest England) that had not been surveyed and explored by non-destructive techniques. The work outlines the approaches that were applied to the remotely sensed data to reveal potential remains: Visualization methods (e.g., hillshade and slope raster images), ISODATA clustering, and Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithms. The results display various archaeological remains within the study site that have been successfully identified. Applying multiple methods and algorithms have successfully improved our understanding of spatial attributes within the landscape. The outcomes demonstrate how raster derivable from inexpensive approaches can be used to identify archaeological remains and hidden monuments, which have the possibility to revolutionize archaeological understanding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage Mapping and Observation)
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Article
An Efficient Probabilistic Registration Based on Shape Descriptor for Heritage Field Inspection
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2020, 9(12), 759; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi9120759 - 19 Dec 2020
Viewed by 795
Abstract
Heritage documentation is implemented by digitally recording historical artifacts for the conservation and protection of these cultural heritage objects. As efficient spatial data acquisition tools, laser scanners have been widely used to collect highly accurate three-dimensional (3D) point clouds without damaging the original [...] Read more.
Heritage documentation is implemented by digitally recording historical artifacts for the conservation and protection of these cultural heritage objects. As efficient spatial data acquisition tools, laser scanners have been widely used to collect highly accurate three-dimensional (3D) point clouds without damaging the original structure and the environment. To ensure the integrity and quality of the collected data, field inspection (i.e., on-spot checking the data quality) should be carried out to determine the need for additional measurements (i.e., extra laser scanning for areas with quality issues such as data missing and quality degradation). To facilitate inspection of all collected point clouds, especially checking the quality issues in overlaps between adjacent scans, all scans should be registered together. Thus, a point cloud registration method that is able to register scans fast and robustly is required. To fulfill the aim, this study proposes an efficient probabilistic registration for free-form cultural heritage objects by integrating the proposed principal direction descriptor and curve constraints. We developed a novel shape descriptor based on a local frame of principal directions. Within the frame, its density and distance feature images were generated to describe the shape of the local surface. We then embedded the descriptor into a probabilistic framework to reject ambiguous matches. Spatial curves were integrated as constraints to delimit the solution space. Finally, a multi-view registration was used to refine the position and orientation of each scan for the field inspection. Comprehensive experiments show that the proposed method was able to perform well in terms of rotation error, translation error, robustness, and runtime and outperformed some commonly used approaches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage Mapping and Observation)
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Article
Virtual Touring for the Puglia Regional Museum Directorate
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2020, 9(12), 741; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi9120741 - 11 Dec 2020
Viewed by 567
Abstract
The article describes the design process carried out to deliver a tool for the virtual fruition of the resources of the Puglia Regional Museum Directorate through multimedia content, within the frame of the Vi.S.T.A. (Virtual and Social heritage Touring Application) project. Identifying the [...] Read more.
The article describes the design process carried out to deliver a tool for the virtual fruition of the resources of the Puglia Regional Museum Directorate through multimedia content, within the frame of the Vi.S.T.A. (Virtual and Social heritage Touring Application) project. Identifying the virtual tour as the most suitable technology to achieve the promotion and exploitation needs of the Directorate’s museums, the project envisages the realization of an integrated system, conceived as a dedicated IT platform including a specific virtual touring section, for a selected pilot case. The article focuses on the design study for the virtual tour interface and the selection of the most appropriate functions for it, and describes the collaborative approach adopted. After the description of the project objectives and context, the design study and the related methodology are presented. Then, the results of the design activity are presented and discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage Mapping and Observation)
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