Special Issue "Climate Adaptation: The Role of Geospatial Data in Sustainable Infrastructures"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. ir. Joep Crompvoets
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Public Governance Institutre, KU Leuven, Parkstraat 45, Bus 3609, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium
Interests: spatial data infrastructure; NMCA business modeling; information management; e-governance; public sector innovation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Cesar Casiano Flores
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Public Governance Institute, KU Leuven, Parkstraat 45 bus 3609, Leuven, 3000, Belgium
Interests: governance assesments; geospatial data governance; urban water transition; climate change adaptation; blue-green insfraestructure; rainwater catchment systems

Special Issue Information

Climate change adaptation requires strategic investments on infrastructure to deliver sustainable solutions. In this context, geospatial data can support the development of sustainable strategies to address climate change and to optimize interventions. In this sense, geospatial data can play a key to support strategic investments in terms of spatial planning, Smart Cities, infrastructure development, land administration, risk management (disaster), etc. Due to this key role, the initiatives on Infrastructure for Spatial Data Information in Europe (INSPIRE) of the European Commission as well as United Nations initiative on Global Geospatial Information Management (UN-GGIM) of UN Department Statistics have established geospatial provisions to support community environmental policies and the Sustainable Development Goals. As geospatial data management is rather complex and very diverse, the construction of associated infrastructure is no longer seen as a technological activity only. It also includes the governance of a large number of organizations, tackling financial and legal implications. Therefore, besides the benefits of geospatial data, there are still important challenges in terms of access, sharing, reuse, quality and harmonization. Understanding the strategic role and challenges of geospatial data infrastructures, this special issue focuses on “The Role of Geospatial Data in Sustainable Infrastructure”. Topics of interest for this special issue include but are not limited to the governance, legal, financial issues of geospatial data and its role to implement both sustainable infrastructure and spatial data infrastructures as part of a climate adaptation strategy and the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals. Practice-oriented papers and case studies are mainly encouraged. They can be in the following topics:

  • Blue-green infrastructure
  • Rainwater catchment systems
  • Flood risk assessment
  • Drought risk maps
  • Smart cities
  • Spatial planning
  • Emergency management
  • Geospatial information management
  • Sustainable development

Keywords

  • geospatial data
  • climate change adaptation
  • blue-green infraestructure
  • risk assessments
  • geoportal
  • sustainable development

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Torrential Flood Water Management: Rainwater Harvesting through Relation Based Dam Suitability Analysis and Quantification of Erosion Potential
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2021, 10(1), 27; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi10010027 - 12 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 572
Abstract
In this study, a relation-based dam suitability analysis (RDSA) technique is developed to identify the most suitable sites for dams. The methodology focused on a group of the most important parameters/indicators (stream order, terrain roughness index, slope, multiresolution valley bottom flatness index, closed [...] Read more.
In this study, a relation-based dam suitability analysis (RDSA) technique is developed to identify the most suitable sites for dams. The methodology focused on a group of the most important parameters/indicators (stream order, terrain roughness index, slope, multiresolution valley bottom flatness index, closed depression, valley depth, and downslope gradient difference) and their relation to the dam wall and reservoir suitability. Quantitative assessment results in an elevation-area-capacity (EAC) curve substantiating the capacity determination of selected sites. The methodology also incorporates the estimation of soil erosion (SE) using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) model and sediment yield at the selected dam sites. The RDSA technique identifies two suitable dam sites (A and B) with a maximum collective capacity of approximately 1202 million m3. The RDSA technique was validated with the existing dam, Gomal-Zam, in the north of Sanghar catchment, where RDSA classified the Gomal-Zam Dam in a very high suitability class. The SE estimates show an average of 75 t-ha−1y−1 of soil loss occurs in the study area. The result shows approximately 298,073 and 318,000 tons of annual average sediment yield (SY) will feed the dam A and B respectively. The SE-based sediment yield substantiates the approximate life of Dam-A and Dam-B to be 87 and 90 years, respectively. The approach is dynamic and can be applied for any other location globally for dam site selection and SE estimation. Full article
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Article
Assessing the Governance Context Support for Creating a Pluvial Flood Risk Map with Climate Change Scenarios: The Flemish Subnational Case
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2020, 9(7), 460; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi9070460 - 21 Jul 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 835
Abstract
Climate change has increased pluvial flood risks in cities around the world. To mitigate floods, pluvial risk maps with climate change scenarios have been developed to help major urban areas adapt to a changing climate. In some cases, subnational governments have played a [...] Read more.
Climate change has increased pluvial flood risks in cities around the world. To mitigate floods, pluvial risk maps with climate change scenarios have been developed to help major urban areas adapt to a changing climate. In some cases, subnational governments have played a key role to develop these maps. However, governance research about the role of subnational governments in geospatial data development in urban water transitions has received little attention. To address this gap, this research applies the Governance Assessment Tool as an evaluative framework to increase our understanding of the governance factors that support the development of pluvial flood risk maps at the subnational level. For this research, we selected the region of Flanders in Belgium. This region is considered among the frontrunners when it comes to the creation of a pluvial flood risk map with climate change scenarios. Data have been collected through in-depth interviews with steering committee actors involved in the development process of the map. The research identified that the current governance context is supportive of the creation of the flood risk map. The government of Flanders plays a key role in this process. The most supportive qualities of the governance context are those related to the degree of fragmentation (extent and coherence), while the less supportive ones are those related to the “quest for control” (flexibility and intensity). Under this governance context, government actors play the primary role. The Flemish government led the maps’ creation process and it was supported by the lower governmental levels. As the provincial government was an important actor to increase local participation, collaboration with private and non-governmental actors in the steering committee was more limited. The financial resources were also limited and the process required a continuous development of trust. Yet, the Flemish Environmental Agency, with the use of technology, was able to increase such trust during the process. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Hydrological web services for operational flood risk monitoring and forecasting at local scale in Niger
Authors: Tiziana De Filippis 1*, Leandro Rocchi 1, Giovanni Massazza 2, Alessandro Pezzoli 2, Maurizio Rosso 4, Mohamed Housseini Ibrahim 3 and Vieri Tarchiani 1
Affiliation: 1 Istituto per la BioEconomia – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IBE-CNR), Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019, Sesto Fiorentino (FI), Italy 2 Interuniversity Department of Regional and Urban Studies and Planning (DIST), Politecnico di Torino & Università di Torino, Viale Mattioli 39, 10125 Turin, Italy 3 Direction de l’Hydrologie (DH), Ministère de l’Hydraulique et de l’Assainissement du Niger, Niamey B.P. 257, Niger 4 Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructure Engineering (DIATI), Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin, Italy * Correspondence: [email protected]; Tel: +390555226044
Abstract: Emerging hydrological services provide stakeholders and political authorities with useful and reliable information to support the decision-making process and develop flood risk management strategies. Concerning data handling, most of these services adopt the paradigm of open data and standard web services paving the way to increase distributed hydrometeorological services’ interoperability. In this paper, we present the SLAPIS web-platform developed for the DH (Directorate for Hydrology of Niger) to tailor hydroclimatic information to the user’s needs, both in content and format. Building upon open-source software components and interoperable web services, we created a software framework covering data capture and storage, data flow management procedures from several data providers, real-time web publication, and service-based information dissemination. The geospatial infrastructure and web services respond to the actual and local decision-making context to improve the usability and usefulness of information derived from hydrometeorological forecasts, models and real-time observations. This paper presents the results of the two years operational campaign for flood early warning on the Sirba River in Niger. Semi-automatic flood warnings tailored and provided to end-users bridge the gap between available technology and local users’ needs for adaptation, mitigation and flood risk management and make progress toward the sustainable development goals.

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