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Special Issue "Anaerobic Bacteria and Their Resistance Mechanisms"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Edit Urbán
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Pécs Medical School; Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Pécs Medical School
Interests: clinical microbiology; anaerobes; oral microbiology; epidemiology; Actinomyces spp.; Bacteroides spp.; Clostridium difficile; MALDI-TOF MS; molecular biology; medicine
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Márió Gajdács
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Pharmacodynamics and Biopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Szeged, 6720 Szeged, Hungary
2. Institute of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Semmelweis University, 1089 Budapest, Hungary
Interests: epidemiology; clinical microbiology; resistance trends; UTIs; antimicrobial stewardship; knowledge–attitude–practice (KAP); novel antimicrobials; drug design; anaerobes
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Strict anaerobic bacteria are important constitutents of the normal human microbiota and they have been implicated in a wide range of infectious processes, that may be serious or life-threatening. The isolation and correct identification of these bacteria may still be challenging in many settings worldwide, due to their laborious culture, extensive laboratory requirements (suitable anaerobiosis) and the fastidious nature of these microorganisms. Susceptibility testing for anerobic bacteria is seldom performed (mainly by national reference laboratories) and there is limited information available on their resistance trends, compared to other bacterial genera; susceptibility testing for anaerobic bacteria is also hindered by the lack of uniform standard operating procedures, while reliable testing methods (i.e., agar diffusion) are expensive and labor-intensive. For many years, the treatment choice in these infections has been mostly empirical, as resistance levels in anaerobes were previously thought to be predictable. Antibiotic resistance in anaerobes remains a neglected field of study; nevertheless, in recent decades, there has been an increasing number of reports on the emergence and molecular mechanisms of beta-lactam and metronidazole resistance in anaerobic bacteria, especially among the members of the Bacteroides/Parabacteroides genus. As these antibiotics are considered the backbone of the treatment of anaerobic infections, increasing levels of resistance may hold significant therapeutic implications for clinicians.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to enrich the existing literature regarding the emergence, testing methods, and mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in strict anaerobic bacteria, therefore the submission of original articles, and review papers on these topics are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Edit Urbán
Dr. Márió Gajdács
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Anaerobes
  • resistance mechanisms
  • antibiotic susceptibility testing
  • PCR and sequencing
  • cfiA/cfxA genes
  • beta-lactam antibiotics
  • nim genes
  • metronidazole
  • MALDI-TOF MS
  • microbiome
  • clinical medicine

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Review
Molecular Physiology of Anaerobic Phototrophic Purple and Green Sulfur Bacteria
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(12), 6398; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22126398 - 15 Jun 2021
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Abstract
There are two main types of bacterial photosynthesis: oxygenic (cyanobacteria) and anoxygenic (sulfur and non-sulfur phototrophs). Molecular mechanisms of photosynthesis in the phototrophic microorganisms can differ and depend on their location and pigments in the cells. This paper describes bacteria capable of molecular [...] Read more.
There are two main types of bacterial photosynthesis: oxygenic (cyanobacteria) and anoxygenic (sulfur and non-sulfur phototrophs). Molecular mechanisms of photosynthesis in the phototrophic microorganisms can differ and depend on their location and pigments in the cells. This paper describes bacteria capable of molecular oxidizing hydrogen sulfide, specifically the families Chromatiaceae and Chlorobiaceae, also known as purple and green sulfur bacteria in the process of anoxygenic photosynthesis. Further, it analyzes certain important physiological processes, especially those which are characteristic for these bacterial families. Primarily, the molecular metabolism of sulfur, which oxidizes hydrogen sulfide to elementary molecular sulfur, as well as photosynthetic processes taking place inside of cells are presented. Particular attention is paid to the description of the molecular structure of the photosynthetic apparatus in these two families of phototrophs. Moreover, some of their molecular biotechnological perspectives are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anaerobic Bacteria and Their Resistance Mechanisms)
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Review
Microscopic Methods for Identification of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria from Various Habitats
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(8), 4007; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22084007 - 13 Apr 2021
Viewed by 539
Abstract
This paper is devoted to microscopic methods for the identification of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In this context, it describes various habitats, morphology and techniques used for the detection and identification of this very heterogeneous group of anaerobic microorganisms. SRB are present in almost [...] Read more.
This paper is devoted to microscopic methods for the identification of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In this context, it describes various habitats, morphology and techniques used for the detection and identification of this very heterogeneous group of anaerobic microorganisms. SRB are present in almost every habitat on Earth, including freshwater and marine water, soils, sediments or animals. In the oil, water and gas industries, they can cause considerable economic losses due to their hydrogen sulfide production; in periodontal lesions and the colon of humans, they can cause health complications. Although the role of these bacteria in inflammatory bowel diseases is not entirely known yet, their presence is increased in patients and produced hydrogen sulfide has a cytotoxic effect. For these reasons, methods for the detection of these microorganisms were described. Apart from selected molecular techniques, including metagenomics, fluorescence microscopy was one of the applied methods. Especially fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in various modifications was described. This method enables visual identification of SRB, determining their abundance and spatial distribution in environmental biofilms and gut samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anaerobic Bacteria and Their Resistance Mechanisms)
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