ijms-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Molecular Background of Male and Female Central Hypogonadism"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Endocrinology and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Aldo E. Calogero
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Dr. Rossella Cannarella
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
Interests: genetics of male infertility; female infertility; pituitary gland; adrenal gland; osteoporosis; transitional age; diabetes; thyroid gland
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Rosita Angela Condorelli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
Interests: male infertility; female infertility; pituitary gland; osteoporosis; transitional age; diabetes; thyroid gland
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Sandro La Vignera
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
Interests: male infertility; female infertility; osteoporosis; transitional age; diabetes; thyroid gland; male sexual disorders
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Central hypogonadism (CH) is a disorder that affects the hypothalamic–pituitary axis with congenital or acquired mechanisms. Ever since Sanger sequencing was developed, various genes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of congenital CH. Since 1991, when the key role of the KAL1 gene in the migration of GnRH-secreting neurons into the hypothalamus and olfactory nerve development was initially reported, Kallmann syndrome (KS) has been defined as a genetic disease leading to congenital CH associated with hyposmia/anosmia. Nowadays, about 30 genes have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of CH, and it has become clear that gene mutations can cause CH with or without hyposmia/anosmia, thus making the classification into normosmic KS and normosmic CH obsolete.  Furthermore, some gene mutations also seem to be implicated in the pathogenesis of late-onset hypogonadism, thus suggesting that genetic CH may be more frequent than expected. This Special Issue of the International Journal of Molecular Sciences aims to gather studies describing recent advances in the genetic background of CH and offer an updated and evidence-based classification of genetic CH. Evaluation of previous and current research will likely broaden our knowledge of genetic CH, including its epidemiology.

Prof. Dr. Aldo E. Calogero
Dr. Rossella Cannarella
Dr. Rosita A. Condorelli
Prof. Sandro La Vignera
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • central hypogonadism;
  • puberty delay;
  • Kallmann syndrome;
  • normosmic hypogonadism;
  • late-onset hypogonadism;
  • infertility;
  • genetics;
  • GnRH neurons.

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

Open AccessReview
Treatment of Men with Central Hypogonadism: Alternatives for Testosterone Replacement Therapy
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(1), 21; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22010021 - 22 Dec 2020
Viewed by 757
Abstract
Central hypogonadism is a clinical condition, characterized by sexual symptoms and low serum testosterone levels, due to an impaired function of the hypothalamus or pituitary gland. Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) is the standard treatment for hypogonadism, but it has some disadvantages. TRT is [...] Read more.
Central hypogonadism is a clinical condition, characterized by sexual symptoms and low serum testosterone levels, due to an impaired function of the hypothalamus or pituitary gland. Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) is the standard treatment for hypogonadism, but it has some disadvantages. TRT is not a good option in men wishing to preserve fertility, nor in men with (a high risk of) prostate cancer, polycythemia, thrombophilia and severe cardiovascular disease. In this review, we discuss alternative treatments for central hypogonadism. If reversible causes are present, non-pharmacological interventions can be therapeutic. Gonadotropins are a good alternative to TRT when fertility is desired in the near future though they require frequent injections. Clomiphene citrate and tamoxifen seem to be a safe alternative for the treatment of functional central hypogonadism in men, as several studies reported a significant increase in testosterone levels with these drugs. However, their use is off-label and data supporting the efficacy of clomiphene citrate and tamoxifen on hypogonadal symptoms are insufficient. For this reason, clomiphene citrate and tamoxifen should not be used in routine clinical practice to treat sexual symptoms in men with central hypogonadism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Background of Male and Female Central Hypogonadism)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop