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Special Issue "Development of Active Compounds to Combat Antibiotic Resistant Microorganisms"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioactives and Nutraceuticals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Aleksandra Królicka
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Intercollegiate Faculty of Biotechnology UG-MUG, Laboratory of Biologically Active Compounds, University of Gdansk, 80-307 Gdansk, Poland
Interests: plant cell tissue, synergistic combination of drugs; biologically active compounds; transformation; phytopharmaceuticals; green synthesis of nanoparticles; drug resistance of bacteria
Dr. Marta Krychowiak-Maśnicka
E-Mail
Co-Guest Editor
Intercollegiate Faculty of Biotechnology UG-MUG, Laboratory of Biologically Active Compounds, University of Gdansk, 80-307 Gdansk, Poland
Interests: plant secondary metabolites; bacterial pathogens; antimicrobials; antibiotic resistance; nanotechnology; drug synergy; drug antagonism; Caenorhabditis elegans

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

While the discovery of antibiotics in the mid-20th century transformed human health, several antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains were identified in the decades that followed. Currently, despite the broad spectrum of antimicrobial compounds, bacterial infections are among the leading causes of death. Moreover, infections resulting from multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDR) strains are an increasing problem in modern medicine, with the ESCAPE group comprising the most threatening bacteria species. Due to bacterial resistance and a limited possibility of a new antibiotic breakthrough, we are inevitably faced with further development of new therapeutic methods to combat human bacterial pathogens.

The mechanisms of bacterial resistance are diverse and include such defense mechanisms as drug enzymatic degradation, removal of compound with the use of pumps (active transport), modifications of drug-target sites of action, or creation of an alternative metabolic pathway. The extensive defense mechanisms presented by bacteria demand a combined effort, encompassing various fields of research, from plant sciences, nanotechnology, chemistry, to computer modeling.

To address the Special Issue of treating bacterial infections caused by MDR bacteria, we are searching for new antibiotics, natural-occurring antibacterial compounds, e.g., plant secondary metabolites or peptides, synthetic substances, e.g., metal nanoparticles, and combining antibacterial substances and/or therapies aimed at obtaining a synergistic effect to prevent bacterial resistance. Reduction in effective doses and diminished toxicity towards human cells, as well as the final multi-target antimicrobial effect, are significant advantages of synergy.

Dr. Aleksandra Królicka

Dr. Marta Krychowiak-Maśnicka

Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • metal nanoparticles
  • in vitro and in vivo studies
  • plant secondary metabolites
  • synthetic peptides
  • new antimicrobials
  • antimicrobial activity
  • non-toxic towards eukaryotic cells
  • computer modeling
  • artificial intelligence algorithms

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Potential of Silver Nanoparticles in Overcoming the Intrinsic Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to Secondary Metabolites from Carnivorous Plants
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(9), 4849; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22094849 - 03 May 2021
Viewed by 278
Abstract
Carnivorous plants are exemplary natural sources of secondary metabolites with biological activity. However, the therapeutic antimicrobial potential of these compounds is limited due to intrinsic resistance of selected bacterial pathogens, among which Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents an extreme example. The objective of the study [...] Read more.
Carnivorous plants are exemplary natural sources of secondary metabolites with biological activity. However, the therapeutic antimicrobial potential of these compounds is limited due to intrinsic resistance of selected bacterial pathogens, among which Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents an extreme example. The objective of the study was to overcome the intrinsic resistance of P. aeruginosa by combining silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with secondary metabolites from selected carnivorous plant species. We employed the broth microdilution method, the checkerboard titration technique and comprehensive phytochemical analyses to define interactions between nanoparticles and active compounds from carnivorous plants. It has been confirmed that P. aeruginosa is resistant to a broad range of secondary metabolites from carnivorous plants, i.e., naphthoquinones, flavonoids, phenolic acids (MBC = 512 µg mL−1) and only weakly sensitive to their mixtures, i.e., extracts and extracts’ fractions. However, it was shown that the antimicrobial activity of extracts and fractions with a significant level of naphthoquinone (plumbagin) was significantly enhanced by AgNPs. Our studies clearly demonstrated a crucial role of naphthoquinones in AgNPs and extract interaction, as well as depicted the potential of AgNPs to restore the bactericidal activity of naphthoquinones towards P. aeruginosa. Our findings indicate the significant potential of nanoparticles to modulate the activity of selected secondary metabolites and revisit their antimicrobial potential towards human pathogenic bacteria. Full article
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